Jeremy Mikola

@jmikola

Talks

Date Presented | Last Commented | By Comment | By Name

Comments

(Show Details)
(Hide Details)
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
Dependency Resolution with a SAT solver
As much as I loved the subject (real Computer Science!), anyone would have needed more than ten minutes to adequately cover this material. Please consider turning this into a full-length presentation, perhaps after the package manager is implemented.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
There is one more thing
This absolutely made my day/week/month (esp. all of the community shout-outs ^_^). Very exciting, full of energy and the perfect closing note for the conference.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
A Symfony2 Grid
@SteveWa: Kris' presentation was a snippet of code that creatively utilized the Form component to implement a tabular list of entities/documents with sorting controls, similar to the list view of the Sf1 admin generator. Kris, I think this really would have benefited from a live demo, or something to explain the beautiful functionality of your creative use of the Form component. Just examining the code might have been too much for folks that received their first taste of Symfony2 forms from Bernhard's presentation the day before.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
Symfony2 Debian Packager
Definitely could see this being a longer talk. It looks like you had a ton of flexibility in that configuration, which wasn't going to be explained in ten minutes. Still, you were very mindful of the time box and kept a good pace throughout. Well done.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
A Symfony2 Admin Bundle
I also haven't used this in any project yet, so I was happy to see the demo. I wish there had been a bit more time to dive into the configuration options, as they looked very intimidating (hopefully they're equally well-documented). Looking forward to using this.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
Let it flow, let it flow, let it flow!
Great tips for developers struggling to meet deadlines, whether in contract or full-time positions. Jacopo did an excellent job talking through the material and the visuals throughout the slides complemented the subject matter well.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
Don't use a screw when you need a nail
Delivery was very good, as was the selection of tools mentioned throughout the slides. At a few points, it felt like we were reading a "top ten X" blog post, as Stefan worked through the tools one by one. To combat that, I'd suggest: stories ("I had some problem and here's how I decided between using tools X, Y and Z to solve it"); slides comparing multiple tools at once (rather than enumerating through the tools).
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
Behavior Driven Development for Symfony2
Solid introduction to BDD principles and how they can be utilized for our projects using Behat. Having all of my testing experience with PHPUnit (which Behat uses underneath AFAIK), I think it would have been helpful to see a live demo of how Behat compiles its syntax down.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
Doctrine in the Real World
There was plenty of solid material in the slides, but the formatting made the code examples unreadable and timing was really off (the presentation was wrapping up shortly after the 30min mark). Did appreciate the supervisor and tailable cursor topic - having worked quite a bit with Doctrine 2, that was some new material I was looking forward to learning.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Mar.2011)
Varnish
Excellent lightning talk. The hand-drawn slides, helpful diagrams, and energetic presentation really got all the necessary points across in the limited time box.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(08.Mar.2011)
Monolog
Admittedly NIH, so more advertisement/selling was needed in this presentation. As-is, the overview of interfaces and proposed drivers didn't add up to a clear reason for why this should be used over another stable log library (and/or creating new output drivers as needed). The one unique feature I liked was writing strategies, such as "fingers crossed", but I'm not sure if that's appropriate for production systems (seems more for dev/testing convenience).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(08.Mar.2011)
Redis
Very concise introduction to Redis with a good overview of its common syntax (considering there is so much more that couldn't be covered in 10 minutes). Slides were well-structured, too.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Mar.2011)
E-commerce in Symfony2 (discussion)
Good discussion around the Vespolina project and how it relates to Symfony2 CMF. Admittedly in need of more organization, so hopefully we follow through on adding Vespolina and CMF to the weekly meeting topics for the #symfony-dev IRC meetings.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Mar.2011)
*You* are the community
Not sure how relevant this comment will be under the flood of 4-star "testing" comments, but I enjoyed this six-person discussion on organizing the Symfony community. Some great ideas were tossed around (setting up bug-hunt days, welcoming new contributors) and it's reassuring to know our community leader is ironing out a master plan :)
Rating: 2 of 5 
(07.Mar.2011)
Symfony2
Heard a few comments that afternoon that this wasn't really keynote material (unlike the second day's awesome keynote), and I have to agree. Beyond the unfortunate demo malfunction, I think the reliance on FrameworkExtraBundle and annotations might have done more harm than good in introducing Symfony2 to new and prospective users. Yes, it makes configuration a breeze, but on the outside (without deep explanation) it can appear very much like the magic in Sf1 that we're trying to abandon. Some of the more interesting topics, such as "parameters.ini" for holding sensitive configuration values, were skipped over in favor of explaining arguably less important issues such as route prefixes and templating annotations.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Mar.2011)
Leveraging Symfony2 Forms
The presentation was well organized, especially considering that Bernhard was significantly refactoring the Form component only a week prior. I think some of the audience Q&A towards the end highlighted some concepts that were ambiguous in the slides (e.g. field inheritance, renderers classes), but that was perhaps to be expected. A lot of this subject matter has yet to be properly documented existed only among scattered mailing list posts beforehand.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Mar.2011)
There's a Rabbit on my Symfony - RabbitMQ and Symfony2 Integration
Alvaro clearly knows the subject matter and his presentation was well-ordered (general architecture, client libraries and PHP examples, and finally Symfony2 bundle).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Mar.2011)
Contributing with Git : Reducing the frictions of Open Source collaboration with the Git VCS
Very entertaining and I loved that Scott addressed common questions during his presentation and well before Q&A, such as the rebase vs. merge argument. The random git command-line tips were also hidden gems of this talk (such as the "^" operator before a branch name for more concise diff reports).
Rating: 3 of 5 
(07.Mar.2011)
Application Security, Dependency Injection, and AOP in Symfony2
I was also hoping to hear about AOP (as hinted in the proposal), so the fact that it wasn't covered/mentioned at all was very unfortunate. As for the remaining overview of the Security component, the concepts presented closely followed Fabien's original introduction during Symfony Day 2010 (in Cologne), but with more technical examples. The above comment is right on in that this stayed very close to the online documentation, but I believe the Twig presentation did as well. That was probably appropriate for the target audience (most were probably seeing this for the first time).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Mar.2011)
The lost art of simplicity
Excellent opening talk for the conference. I walked in expecting to hear some Microsoft evangelism but was very impressed with the universality of Josh's presentation. This was sound advice for any software engineer trying to preserve their sanity and productivity amidst waves of rapidly changing business requirements and new technologies.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.Oct.2011)
TBA
Great slides on the significance of Symfony2 components (esp. for those that missed his framework-building workshop the day before). I suppose we could debate if it was *entirely* spontaneous, but kudos to git-pushing the Timeline component live during the keynote - great way to avoid the a "when will that be available" question during Q&A :) I'm very much looking forward to the upcoming community initiatives. All in all, this was an ideal keynote to wrap up the event.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(24.Oct.2011)
Dependency Injection and the Symfony2 Service Container
Subject matter was very much on point and should be considered "required reading" for any new developers getting involved with Symfony2. I agree with some observations above that Richard seemed self-conscious at times, but I don't think that detracted from the presentation. I was very satisfied with Richard's handling of my impromptu "what about interface injection?" question. It was clear from his answer that he participated in the community discussion about the subject months ago.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.Oct.2011)
Extending and Leveraging the Power of the Command Line Interface
I've had the pleasure of taking a look at some previous training slides coming out of Sensio, but those were for the framework in general. I was very interested to see what Hugo would come up with for the Console component. I thought the example application was a great choice and thoroughly covered the ins and outs of the component (e.g. input, output, container usage). Unit and functional testing examples were much appreciated. Based on the audience questions, I think the best practice of how a console command should mimic a controller could have been touched upon in more detail. I think plenty of people weren't aware that controllers should also be lightweight methods that depend on services to do the heavy lifting. One thing I think could have been included was handling of STDIN, STDOUT and STDERR streams. Granted, I don't think they'd have fit naturally with the hangman example, but the topics can be useful for actual projects.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.Oct.2011)
Catching Opportunities with Open Source
When presentation slides consist mainly of captioned photos, it really puts on the onus on the speaker to express the content - this can be disastrous or, as in this case, magnificent. Stefan and Christian had great harmony in juggling the topics and I think this talk rivaled Fabien's keynote in capturing the audience's attention. Kudo's to both speakers for inadvertently starting the #shitload meme.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(24.Oct.2011)
Inspire yourself of Symfony2 to create better code
I think this presentation was a good complement to Richard's DIC talk later in the afternoon. Appreciating SoC is vital to embracing Symfony2 and understanding how and why it functions. The call to pragmatism is also something hard to argue with. I'm particularly interested in learning about how Sensio uses their own framework (for this reason, I love seeing the bundles you guys publish), and it's clear that a pragmatic approach is valued there.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Jul.2012)
Keynote
In contrast to previous Symfony conferences, there was not a shocking "one more thing" announcement to be made, so I think this might have been lackluster for some. That's no fault of the keynote, and it's a bit unrealistic to expect a huge surprise. Admittedly, we've become quite spoiled :) Regardless, it was quite evident that a good bit of effort goes into preparing the keynote material. Moreover, I think everyone enjoys the community interaction (whether it's sharing tweets at previous keynotes or the profile photos used during this one). I do think the event would benefit from having a structured closing keynote on the final day, even if it's only 10-15 minutes. As-is, we ended with Jeopardy on Friday and then the conference quietly (and a bit awkwardly, IMO) wrapped up afterwards. The opening day keynote is a great opportunity to give a state of the union and perhaps introduce the subjects being presented at the conference, but I think a closing keynote also helps frame the conference.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(10.Jul.2012)
Keynote
Correction: Jeopardy was Thursday and lightning talks were Friday. That's what I get for waiting a month to leave feedback.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Jul.2012)
Composer's SAT solver
Walked in a bit late to this, but I'm glad I caught most of it. Granted, I was extremely sleepy when Nils presented this the previous year, but I felt the material really benefited from a longer time slot. Nils has also developed quite a knack for breaking down complex topics and real computer science into easily digestible presentations.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Jul.2012)
wetter.com - Relaunch with symfony2, Assetic, Varnish and Twig
I would second Adrien's point above regarding the presentation abilities of both speakers (even disregarding language barriers). It's always nice to see real examples of how companies are using these technologies. That said, there is a challenge with presenting issues faced with older versions of libraries (Assetic in this case). In those cases, I think the audience would benefit from a higher-level discussion of the problem and how the solution was approached, as the code examples may not be relevant to developers working with the current version.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Jul.2012)
How we built the new responsive BBC News site
The slides were very well-designed, conveyed a good amount of information very clearly, and perfectly complemented the delivery.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Jul.2012)
Designing HTTP Interfaces and RESTful Web Services
This was quite a treat for the conference. Excellent on all counts.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Jul.2012)
ORMs don't kill your database, developers do!
I walked into this expecting something more abstract than a tour of Doctrine ORM, but it held its own.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Jul.2012)
Symfony2 CMF
Lukas fills a presentation slot with a web browse better than most do with prepared slides. Covered CMF, PHPCR and upcoming development plans in depth, and maintained good interation with the audience.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Jul.2012)
Object Calisthenics applied to PHP
General pro-tips for OO programming. Extremely relevant and entertainingly delivered.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Sep.2012)
The Secrets of Building and Participating in Open Source Communities
Great keynote to start off the day. Dries told an engaging story and certainly knows how to work a podium.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(17.Sep.2012)
Full Stack BDD for Symfony2
I spent the first half of the presentation wondering when PHPSpec2 would show up, but was happily surprised when Konstantin and Marcello introduced it during the course of the demo. For a live demo, things worked out quite well, and it did a great job conveying the purpose of both tools. Konstantin's Vim bindings were the star of the show, as it'd have been impossible to cover so much code (from scratch!) in so little time. As excellent as the content was, I think the speakers do need to work on coordination. There were several points where Marcello was pushing forward and/or Konstantin couldn't get a word in.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(17.Sep.2012)
Symfony2's Descent into phpDocumentor2
Slides were very well-composed and clear, as was Mike's delivery. That said, I felt the subject matter would have been better suited for a general PHP conference. I imagine that the audience at Symfony Live either has no need of the components alone (as framework users) or would otherwise already consider the components for stand-alone development needs.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(17.Sep.2012)
Drupal 8
Early parts of the presentation were a bit remedial given Dries' morning keynote, but I appreciated the technical half of the presentation, which outlined how Drupal was applying Symfony2 components and discussed the release timeline. In particular, the timing notes would complement Fabien's later talk on his RFC for Symfony2 release cycles.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Sep.2012)
Symfony, What's Next?
I appreciated how the keynote started off with an appeal to help Kris Wallsmith. As much as we enjoy social events or Sensio Connect badges, that's truly a greater example of community where it matters most. I think an essential component of Fabien's keynotes, for better or worse, is something new to unveil. The release cycle discussion was highly relevant, especially on the heals of 2.1 and leading into Drupal 8's feature freeze later this year. Taking question was an excellent idea and I hope to see that again at future conferences (I assume we have Lorna or the Sensio UK guys to thank for that).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Nov.2012)
Your code sucks, let's fix it.
My first introduction to object calisthenics was Guilherme Blanco's unconference talk at Symfony Live Paris 2012. This built upon the same content and really filled out a full presentation nicely. The code examples were particularly well-presented (e.g. formatting, highlights).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Nov.2012)
Why PHP could be the most important programming language in the world
The title was surely controversial, but it made for an interesting discussion. In particular, the build up to the reference to "A Soldier's Story" was quite nice. Overall, the subject was inspiring, the perspective was relatively unbiased (given Reg's polyglot background) and his speaking energy was solid. To the previous comments, I don't think this would fly as a keynote at too many other conferences, but it seemed appropriate for today's even. Despite starting off late and light, I think it ended on a good note to start the morning.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(03.Nov.2012)
Avoiding the OWASP Top 10 security exploits
The cohesion between the ten items seemed light (contrast to Rafael's "code sucks" talk, where he brought it back together at the end), but the content itself was solid and Mark did a great job talking through it. There were some timing/balance issues, where it felt we sped through some items much quicker than others (and not for lack of importance). As an improvement, I think mixing in real world examples or stories from CakePHP's development would be beneficial. Most of us are used to seeing harmless alerts for XSS demonstrations, but seeing an actual attack would drive the point home and alleviate the need to explain "this looks innocuous but it can be something far worse".
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Nov.2012)
Testing and Devops Culture
I concur with Joel. This had a very conversational and anecdotal theme, and I think that made the content all the better. It wasn't a merely list of best practices; rather, a review of lessons learned along the way. As far as speaking ability, Laura Beth clearly knows what she's doing up there :)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(03.Nov.2012)
Bring your site to life using WebSockets
Live demos are always risky, and having two out of three work is quite respectable. It was all the better that they interacted with the audience, too. The audio issues and your cold aside, you definitely seemed nervous up there -- that may be something to work on for future talks. Beyond that, the content was excellent and you did a great job covering the basics of web-based socket IO before introducing your own work.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2012)
Annotating with Annotations
Very comprehensive overview on the state of annotations in PHP. Much like the object calisthenics presentation, your code examples were easy to digest and there was a lot of meat in there for users to pick up and work with.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(06.Nov.2012)
Using BDD Language in Your Unit Tests
Presentation skills were right up there for a first time speaker. As a practical application, I think you should definitely look into integrating Behat or PHPSpec2 into this presentation. Personally, the idea of having BDD language in test case doc blocks seems ripe for getting out of sync (we have that probably for doc blocks in real code already). One thing I found missing from the BDD examples was the scenario description. Usually, you start with "As a customer/user/client, I want to" and that leads into the functionality. From a high level, it also lets you determine how features are grouped by stakeholder. There's definitely a story to be told with having non-developers (e.g. product managers) create the BDD stories to describe the functionality the want implemented. Another idea that comes to mind is the relation to kanban project management, where features are tracked as user stories throughout the development process. If you decide to go the route of no tying this to Behat or some other library, you can definitely explore the kanban and PM side further.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(06.Nov.2012)
Scepticism and the Web
I think the areas of improvement have already been discussed -- the essay and wide, off-screen projection was not a suitable format. Beyond that, I found the lead-in from introducing the topic was proportionally quite long compared to the topical application of not blindly trusting software/hardware technologies. There is a lot of content to be discussed about avoiding fanboyism and brand cults, and I think reaching that sooner would improve digestion of the material (especially at a tech conference). If you're sticking with HTML, I'd suggest something like Reveal.js[1], which would let you lay things out with Markdown and full-page quotes/images. [1]: http://lab.hakim.se/reveal-js/
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2012)
Fun Stuff
Fun stuff, indeed. This should have been a real session! Paul is a delightful speaker and the story/material was quite captivating.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2012)
Why I <3 Laravel 4
Some of the memes were a bit graphic, but there was real material buried within this presentation (even if the overweight guy on slide #19 ate the surrounding slides). This would definitely need to be sanitized a bit for a real slot, but it was quite an enjoyable way to wrap up the unconference. I'm not sure if this was Phil's first speaking role, but he did a great job regardless.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2012)
Closing Keynote
Great case of slides being a mere accent to a talk. The entire keynote flowed like a conversation, and Chris didn't drop a beat. I had no idea what to expect based on the title, but there was a solid amount of practical application and relevant stories throughout the talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(06.Nov.2012)
Team Management - Introduction to Behavioral vs Motivation Psychology
I concur with Stefan. It definitely stood out from other topics, but it applied itself well to the audience. This is a good model for the skepticism talk to follow.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(03.Mar.2013)
Data Aggregation with MongoDB
These were the two GitHub projects mentioned towards the end of the talk. * https://github.com/jmikola/silex-mongodb-aggregation-demo * https://github.com/TylerBrock/mongo-hacker
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2013)
PHP Extension Writing
The workshop was paced very well and Sara's material and delivery were both excellent. The git repository used for exercises and code exploration will definitely be useful references in the future.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2013)
Practicing Failure
Rating: 4 of 5 
(18.May.2013)
Scaling PHP with HipHop
This cleared up a few misconceptions I had about the project, as it's come a long way from the compiler model of years past. Beyond the VM and JIT itself, I appreciated the look into some of the internal tools and features that have yet to be fully published.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2013)
Performance Perpetrators: Profiling for Professionals
Derick covered a wide array of tools and concepts in the span of 60 minutes. The topics throughout the talk were well-structured and built upon each other.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2013)
WordPress is Everywhere: Extreme Portability as a Double-Edged Sword
This keynote was a great look into the decision-making behind what is likely the most widely-deployed PHP application today. I found the stats on various PHP environments very interesting, and it clearly explained a lot of the "why" questions about Wordpress' development. Combined with some lunch-table conversation later that afternoon, I came to understand how Wordpress is hanging in limbo between some really lousy environments in the wild and a PHP core team seeking to adopt an aggressive release cycle and leave older versions behind.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2013)
Open Sourcing Mental Illness
Thanks for driving out for a day to share this during the uncon. It was inspiring to hear you open up about this and increase awareness on the subject, and I'm sure it will have an impact on folks long after the conference.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2013)
30 topics in 30 minutes
Mind = blown.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Oct.2013)
It was like that when I got here: Steps towrds Modernizing A Legacy of Codebase
Excellent topic and delivery. I think this resonated with good bit of the audience, as folks interested in picking up new libraries and frameworks often still have legacy projects to maintain.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Oct.2013)
Securing your Web Apps Now
Delivery for the first half of the presentation was a bit rushed, but the pacing got much better mid-way through. Covered a broad number of security topics with practical applications.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Oct.2013)
MongoDB: Dealing with the Unexpected
I was worried this might be too advanced a topic, but you did a good job introducing new concepts and still fit everything into the limited time slot. Discussion of general error handling practices (not just for MongoDB) was also helpful. Based on the detail of Q&A after the talk, it seemed to be well-received as well.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Oct.2013)
Should I use a CMS or a Framework
This topic seemed quite on point for a good portion of the audience working on client projects or in agencies. I think the content would benefit from more examples/discussion on extending CMS software (e.g. users that need to add e-commerce functionality to their CMS, or creating multi-domain deployments). Coverage of the PHP-CR and Symfony CMF projects was definitely relevant, and I think it'd be worth going into a bit more detail there in a future revision (especially as the project continues to mature).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Oct.2013)
Spotting the weak points in your PHP projects. Are your dependencies the chink in your armor?
I believe this was a last-minute addition to the schedule and Thomas did well regardless. The introductory slide of security tips and best practices felt a bit compressed and could be stretched out a bit (instead of a single slide/list). The security survey figures were interesting, as were the anecdotes. Given the coverage of Composer, I think you should definitely add some examples of its best practices, such as keeping composer.lock in version control and using version limits (e.g. ~1.0) to avoid unpredictable updates to unstable or BC-breaking versions.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(08.Oct.2013)
PHP Annotation
This touched on many of the practical uses for annotations (e.g. dependency injection, data modeling), but the presentation seemed to tread lightly and stop short of really making a case for them -- this may have been your delivery and not the content itself. Contrast this with Rafael Dohms' presentation on annotations (several recordings are out there), which makes a strong argument for them. While there were a lot of code examples of annotations in use, I think devoting some slides to how the various parser implementations work is called for. Based on the slides, I saw a bit of the Reflection API, but not enough to create my own annotations. Perhaps the slides were focused on Laravel's implementation, but the annotation examples also didn't cover some of the complex values/parameters that Doctrine's parser allows for (e.g. named parameters, nested annotations for things like an array of database indexes). Mentioning PHPUnit as a long-time user of annotations (I believe they use their own parser) would be great as well, since many developers use things like @expectedException and @dataProvider without a second thought, although they might be hesitant to use annotations in their own application code.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.Oct.2013)
Doctrine ORM and Zend Framework 2
Very solid content and excellent delivery. Marco was able to talk through the slides fluidly and move them along without having to glance back at each new slide and read from it. My only complaint is that my own Doctrine presentation on the next day followed nearly the same outline :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.Oct.2013)
Socket Programming with PHP
Very informative presentation that started from the essential basics and history before wrapping up with high-level PHP APIs. I'll agree with above requests for more code examples. There were a handful in the middle of the deck, but this is a subject where folks are probably going to go back and refer to your slide deck for reference. Also, while the entire slide deck had a consistent theme, many of the code examples looked to be images captured from an editor (with various styles). Those can probably be tidied up or changed to actual formatted text.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.Oct.2013)
Modern PHP
Glad I finally got a chance to see Ben deliver this in person. Filed under "should have been a keynote".
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.Oct.2013)
API First
Excellent content and delivery, and the interweaving of anecdotes and education was seamless. I don't know if it was intentional, but the slides did leave adequate time at the end for questions, which can allow the audience to bring up relevant API topics not covered in the slides themselves. Re: Espen's comment above, I think those are good subjects to bring up (as talking points) even if the audience doesn't think to ask about them.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Oct.2013)
The great debate
Who doesn't love entertaining panel discussions?
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.Jan.2014)
PHP objects internal design
I was looking forward to this informative talk, and it delivered on all counts. Slide content was sometimes cluttered (mainly those with code, output, and bullet points), although the verbal delivery was very clear. I think a bit about the work you're doing with Pimple for SensioLabs would have made a good anecdote towards the end of the presentation, after you introduced the class entries and spoke about overriding object handlers.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.Jan.2014)
Reacting: Event Driven Programming
The presentation was laid out very well, starting with HTTP and socket communication via curl/telnet, and introduced React naturally. When covering the event loops, I think doing a 2-3 minute dive into the PHP implementation (beyond the interface) would clear things up for the audience and answer some questions preemptively. The C extensions need only be mentioned in passing, which you did. On React's DNS implementation, there was a missed opportunity to explain why that was necessary (PHP's DNS resolution blocks, and you'd need it for other client components).
Rating: 0 of 5 
(16.Mar.2014)
Doctrine, Object Persistence, and You
For those curious about the hybrid MySQL/MongoDB application I alluded to, see: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11368517/162228 Kudos to Ross Larson for mentioning it on Twitter.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Sep.2014)
Become a RUM Runner
If Vesna hadn't disclosed so in her opening slides, I would not have guessed that this was her speaking debut. Her presentation was well-structured and she kept good pace with the material, stopping at well-placed jokes to liven things up. A few of the slides were cluttered -- mainly those with embedded charts and graphics, sometimes positioned alongside bullet points. Still, this was an amazing effort, considering Vesna picked up deck.js two days before the conference to recreate her slides after some ill-timed data loss of the originals. Overall, I was most impressed with the discussion and Q&A around and after the presentation. Of the few talks I attended, this by far had the most audience involvement and conversation. Vesna did a great job fielding questions and even dropped an anecdote about an email conversation she had with a former Amazon employee (Greg Linden?) regarding some oft-cited statistics about website response times. That was a subtle hint at the amount of preparation Vesna had done on the topic, and it showed.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(14.Oct.2014)
Developing Beautiful, Measurable Software
Sébastien: thanks for the feedback. I was certainly aware that the code examples during the object calisthenics portion are contrived (most were adapted from the original Java articles on the subject). I'll look into replacing those with examples from PHP projects should I present the material again.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(27.Oct.2014)
Building Your First App with Silex and MongoDB
I've commandeered the "slides" link in the talk description to point to the workshop project's GitHub repository, which now has Readme file pointing to all of the presentation decks and other resources we covered during today's session. I also added some notes and code improvements for the default configuration files -- my apologies for not catching that before this morning!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.May.2016)
Build a Better Hat Rack: All Contributions Welcome
This was a thought-provoking session that covered the social-to-technical gamut of evaluating open-source contributions. Katie kept the material flowing with positive energy and left the audience with a handful of practical take-aways. The presentation was not tied to any particular language or tribe, so it'd fit right in at a non-PHP or polyglot conference.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.May.2016)
RIP TSRMLS_CC: Porting Extensions to PHP 7
Adam covered various approaches for upgrading extensions to PHP 7 and gave a thorough explanation of how best to provide PHP 5.x and 7 compatibility in the same project. His experience as maintainer of both the Radius and New Relic extensions was evident in how he handled audience questions and dove into details as they came up. Fundamentals for extension development were introduced succinctly and the material also had solid depth so that even those familiar with extension development were given some new ideas.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.May.2016)
The New Revolution
Samantha masterfully wove personal anecdotes, history lessons, and philosophical points into an outstanding presentation. Between her choice of topic and high-octane delivery, this was keynote material through and through.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(31.May.2016)
Diving into HHVM Extensions
Although a solid, technical presentation on a topic in dire need of more documentation, this did come across as an answer in search of a question. James touched on this in the latter half of the presentation when discussing appropriate use cases for an extension (e.g. interfacing with a C library). To that end, I felt like the audience would have been better served with an example somewhere between the "Hello World"-esque calculator and culminating OpenGL example, despite the obvious "wow" effect of the OpenGL demo. I can see this being a presentation that users would want to refer to after the fact for reference. Given the amount of code in the OpenGL example, much of it unrelated to HHVM's extension API, a more basic library would be easier to digest. I don't recall if James mentioned basing the examples on a particular HHVM version, but given that its APIs are still evolving, it would be beneficial to annotate the slides with the version employed and/or notes about such caveats, especially if folks may end using this as reference material.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.May.2016)
Uncle Cal's Career Advice
A fine topic to wrap up the conference. Cal's preparation and dynamism was most evident.

Events They'll Be At

No events so far

Events They Were At

Symfony Catalunya 2016 Jul 21, 2016
php[tek] 2016 May 23, 2016
PHP&Friends @ FOSDEM Jan 30, 2016
SymfonyCon Paris 2015 Dec 02, 2015
True North PHP 2015 Nov 05, 2015
Lone Star PHP 2015 Apr 16, 2015
SunshinePHP 2015 Feb 05, 2015
SymfonyCon Madrid 2014 Nov 26, 2014
php[tek] 2014 May 19, 2014
Laracon NYC May 15, 2014
OpenWest 2014 May 08, 2014
Lone Star PHP 2014 Apr 25, 2014
MidwestPHP 2014 Mar 14, 2014
SunshinePHP 2014 Feb 06, 2014
SymfonyCon Warsaw 2013 Dec 09, 2013
ZendUncon 2013 Oct 08, 2013
ZendCon 2013 Oct 07, 2013
Web & PHP Conference Sep 16, 2013
php[tek] 2013 May 14, 2013
MidwestPHP Conference Mar 02, 2013
SunshinePHP 2013 Feb 08, 2013
True North PHP 2012 Nov 02, 2012
SymfonyDay 2011 Oct 19, 2011
php[tek] 2015 May 18, 2015
OpenWest 2015 May 09, 2015
ZendCon 2014 Oct 30, 2014
ShorePHP August 2014 Aug 19, 2014
© Joind.in 2018