Lee Davis

@leedavis81

Talks

No talks so far

Comments

(Show Details)
(Hide Details)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(16.Jun.2011)
Apache Zeta Components
Great talk but generally quite concerned about the shelf life of this component library. Maintaining complete backwards compatibility in ALL releases, no adoption of namespaces, or even function name changes may see Zeta eating the dust of other component libraries / frameworks. My advice, drop the concern of clawing hold of the current eZcomponents users, and push this library onto the bleeding edge.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Oct.2012)
Building a Firehose
In typical fashion Ian filled the room and left the audience with tons to ponder. This session was rammed with useful advice on processing real time data, and demonstrated some interesting architectures for applying / managing synchronisation. Being tasked to loosen up a very ridged data flow on a current project meant I found this talk very valuable. However, I do feel some aspects were compromised to fit the time slot. I would have liked: An elaboration on the problem with less haste moving into solutions. Some background on the technologies used (Zookeeper / ZMQ / Redis) in the solutions (knowledge was sometimes assumed). An occasional pause to allow absorption (specifically when screen sliding code). I think a fair part of the audience got dazzled on this one, hence the "no questions". +1 for a double-length slot.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Oct.2013)
Models and Service Layers - Hemoglobin and Hobgoblins
My most enjoyable talk of the day. Great content and really engaging. I hope we'll see more of you in the future Ross. PS I share your man crush.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(06.Oct.2013)
Debugging HTTP
Good talk with a reasonable amount of grounding on HTTP. Would have been nice to have gone a little further into REST than basic CRUD operations. When demostrating a POST request with n number of failures before success, it would have been a perfect opportunity to mention the OPTIONS header for retrieving basic info on what a POST actually requires before running through a number of failed scenarios. Marked down slightly as she didn't mention the chrome postman extension.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Oct.2013)
Building Better Developers
Funny, engaging and thought provoking. This guys a real english @ircmaxell - apparently.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Oct.2013)
Building Better Developers
Funny, engaging and thought provoking. This guys a real english @ircmaxell - apparently.
Rating: 1 of 5 
(08.Oct.2013)
0x0F Ways to be a Better Developer
"0x0F ways to better suck eggs" Although there were some very valid points I don't think it was well tailored to the audience, and came off a little patronising. "how to eat an elephant" "take one step at a time" "teach a man to fish" After these worn out quotations were fully regurgitated, they went on to make a quip about playing buzzword bingo when talking to managers. Hypocritical much? I would've expected something a bit more exciting for the keynote.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Feb.2015)
Are you out of memory, or have plenty to spare?
A great deep dive into how the linux kernel handles and allocates memory. Found the breakdown of a number things extremely useful. For example: - How processes are allocated virtual memory - How swap works - Buffers, Cache - Overflow - Forking and the copy on write implementation in the kernel. A real eye-opener on just how efficient memory management is at the lower levels. Joshua delivered this one very well, and kept the audience engaged throughout. Bravo sir.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Feb.2015)
Your API is a UI
Despite Chris’ edgy mannerism when I first entered the room, he delivered his session like a true professional. His talk was engaging, and nicely avoided the opinionated points we often hear about API design. His topic knowledge was outstanding and he shipped out a massive wad of advice on how to correctly build, manage and nurture an API. These things are very often thrown together without any real thought into the users needs. Chris laid out a number practical considerations when building an API that are often missed. On a personal level, the message of “planning” really struck a chord. I’ve sometimes been a little hasty in the past with shipping API’s and had to endure struggle of maintaining a poor design. Everything you present to your clients becomes a dependency (and has the potential to be a breaking change). Plan and define a rock solid strategy from the offset. once it’s out there, you have to support it. Great talk, fruitful of the guidance API developers really need. I look forward to seeing Chris on the (technical) stage again.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.May.2015)
Voodoo PHP
I really enjoyed this talk, but I went straight home and showered afterwards.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Jul.2015)
Down the Rabbit Hole: Lessons Learned combining Career and Community
Cal delivered a great message about how important community is, and how some problems can only be solved together. There was an interesting concoction of personal stories and experiences that I found very valuable. I enjoyed the deep dive into the pillars of what make a good community. I would have preferred a more general "Find your role models" message than a "Here's the prestige" pin up. I know of and follow each and every name he presented and wholly agree on how awesome they are, but I think the PHP community does need be careful not create a band of worshipped untouchable elites. There are so many amazing (but quiet) people out there that might just be your role model, go find them. I think the message to make the effort and engage in the hallway track really sunk in. I personally spoke to over a dozen PHPers whom I'd never met before, and people seemed a lot more approachable than at other conferences I've been to. Overall it was a great delivery from Cal and an excellent keynote.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Jul.2015)
The Art of Programming
I enjoyed Erika's talk mostly due to the inner conflict it drew with the crowd. There was even a "But art is useless!?" remark from a delegate at the end. Express - convey (a thought or feeling) There's no getting away from it, writing code is a creative expression. That expression can be loved, hated and ridiculed (and there's no denying there's plenty of that happening). So code isn't art but here we are in our tribes gladiatorially defending our masterpieces. Sure the technical side always comes in and moulds this expression to be optimised for performance or readability, but it still remains an expression. Let me ask you this, how does it make you feel when you: - Look over old code? - Delete code you've spent a long time putting together? - Found a simple piece of code that does exactly what you wanted to achieve? Wait.... code gives you feels? Let's think about THAT for second. Anyway, major digression. Really enjoyed this talk and the "where the magic happens" graph was really interesting. Every developer should be able to plot themselves on it an see where they're lacking. Great content and well delivered by Erika.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Jul.2015)
Parallel PHP
I'm a big fan of Joe. He's extremely honest, I love his anti-guff approach to technology. He says it as he see's it. I completely appreciate his message of "multi-threading is unlikely to solve your problem" and a detailed list of what you shouldn't try and do with threads. Overall it was a good introduction to a tool that people should be aware of (and may even find useful). I think there was some assumed knowledge. He could have detailed exactly what a thread is, why they're dangerous and why we tend to avoid using a ton of them. Maybe it would have lost more of the audience than gained, who knows. Either way, the technical stuff is why I attend these things. It creates a buzz and gets people thinking. So thank you Joe, I hope to see your massive beard in the spotlight again soon.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
How I learned to stop worrying and love Regular Expressions
I love listening to Jordi talk. He's always so chilled and friendly (because he'll only berate you privately). I've always had a fear of regexes, although I'm probably better at them than I give myself credit for, I always flinch when faced with one, or at least the knowledge that now is the time to use one. Anyway, this talk broke things down really well, and I followed along happily until he moved onto the lookahead/behind syntax, and then in typical fashion I hid back into my shell. I wish I could face them, like Nicolas Cage did in The Rock when confronted with Sergeant Crisp wielding an extremely sharp knife. He slammed on that rocket, "You know how THAT s**t works!!?". Nice one Nicky! I unfortunately (not as brave as Mr Cage) will have to continue to try and face my demons and figure out exactly how that s**t works. Until then, I'm a half baked regexer, with plenty of space in my toolbox. Thanks for the inspiration Jordi.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
Doctrine ORM Good Practices and Tricks
My man gandalPHP just smashed it. Really good talk from Marco that helped confirm a lot of my thoughts and taught me a few things about overly depending on the DB to provide behaviours you should really encapsulate yourself (to keep your entities in a valid state). He detailed a number of tips to help achieve this, as well as highlighting common code smells that many will do without even thinking about. Great little point from him: Can you build your entire application object graph and persist it to a text file? - Interesting challenge that will inevitably highlight what behaviours you're not explicitly catering for in your model layer. I think there was definitely some assumed knowledge on this talk (chap behind me whispered "what's DDD?"), but wasn't too bad that you couldn't follow along. As for the challenge to add something to the talk; I struggled on this, but, maybe: - covering hydration - when it makes to use it. - when to use object references rather than (possibly) forcing a DB round trip I think this will be one a few people re-watch when the video is released. Bravo Marco.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
Dip Your Toes in the Sea of Security
Maybe if Capt' Asgrim Sparrow kept his beloved Black Pearl a little more secure he wouldn't have lost it in mutiny to Hector Barbossa. Arrrghhh, me hearties. Where's your parrot James? Eh? Go hard or go home. Ok that's enough. Security is a really difficult topic to cover because it's so easy to dive into rabbit holes and start losing people. James did a really good job of keeping it high level, and pointing delegates in the right direction for them to venture on. It's amazing how much he did actually touch on; from the commonly known injection, reflection attacks to threat modelling and timing attacks. Ton's of stuff to ponder on and finished nicely with a great anecdote of his own amusing blunder (we all do it). There's a huge amount of value in this talk which in my opinion developers should have fully absorbed before being allowed to touch anything that might hit production. Really well done James (or are you James? You say you are, but...?).
Rating: 2 of 5 
(21.Oct.2016)
Groupies, Roadies, Rockstars
As much as I enjoy listening to Cal's anecdotes, I had a real hard time sitting through this one. I think categorising anyone contributing to open source is a very bad idea. You really don't want to be branding yourself as an x language roadie or a y framework groupie. This leads to tribalism where people end up following projects blindly regardless of its actual value. There are already way too many advocating solutions with little or no knowledge of drawbacks. Whether you're a roadie "shovelling shit" and just owning it without acknowledgement (or thanks), a groupie struggling to get your "honoured place at the table" or the rockstar playing endlessly to the empty crowd, I have one piece of advice; get the hell out of there! You're doing it for the wrong reasons and you will burn out. One message I took from the talk was that if you're dedicated and invest enough energy, it will pay off (cos it happened to a band once). This is terrible advice. Absolutely do NOT work on something in the hope of gaining fame and glory. For every one that paid off, thousands didn't. Avoid at all costs trying to prop up your internet fame because you could inherit and push around a title. Of course if you're enjoying something or believe it has practical value, then crack on. If you don't, put it to bed. This is commonly known as "failing fast". Judge everything on it's own merits, even if a rockstar said it.

Events They'll Be At

No events so far

Events They Were At

ZendCon 2016 Oct 18, 2016
PHP UK Conference 2016 Feb 18, 2016
PHP UK Conference 2015 Feb 18, 2015
PHPNW 2013 Oct 03, 2013
PHPNW12 Oct 04, 2012
PHP UK Conference 2012 Feb 24, 2012
jQuery UK 2012 Feb 10, 2012
PHP UK Conference 2011 Feb 24, 2011
© Joind.in 2017