Frits van Campen

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Rating: 4 of 5 
(08.Jun.2012)
I Teach PHP - HELP!
I enjoyed the interaction with the speaker. Teaching PHP in the academic world is apparently frowned upon, whereas there are plenty of job vacancies. To Clinton Imgrams: perhaps you can also post your situation on http://programmers.stackexchange.com/ I'm sure you'll be able to find some sympathizers.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(08.Jun.2012)
Programming Style and Your Brain
Loved it! It's great to see Douglas Crockford in the flesh. I've been using JSLint with great success for about two years now. I also loved the series you did for a Yahoo (History of JavaScript). One point of criticism: You started off with a psychological approach to how programmers program, which is the foundation for explaining some of the not-so-trivial (in JavaScript) code styles, as enforced by JSLint. I understand why you added it - trying to side-step the minefield that is code-style preference - but it felt a bit slow. Please keep fighting for us for a better JavaScript! :)
Rating: 2 of 5 
(08.Jun.2012)
How not to design a toad
I like the idea for this talk but I would have loved to see some more examples. I don't think analyzing the DPC website is a very realistic example; it's aiming waaaay too high. The kind of websites 'developers' make are sites like your phpDocumentor. Choosing the right fonts and colors only becomes important on the very high end websites. I think the focus should be more on content, structure and interaction.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(08.Jun.2012)
Designing Beautiful Software
I liked the example and the iterative build-up. I didn't like that you ended the example right when it became interesting: dependency injection. Moving the settings to a static settings.conf file would be a logical step, and adding a factory for creating the mailer resource. Also, through the many refactorings you lost track of your original requirements. I think it's important to always go back to your requirements - unless your goal is to write a very generic mailer wrapper. Your requirements were quite humble in comparison and a simple dependency injection example, with static settings would have sufficed. The TransportLayer abstraction is technically interesting but perhaps not an ideal candidate for a stand-up presentation. Also I think dependency injection is really 'beautiful' and it suits your chosen example well. Great talk! :)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(08.Jun.2012)
Separating the concerns
A good introduction to Seperation of Concerns. I would have loved to see more emphasis on the conceptual benefits of adding a layer of abstraction in this manner. Adding more abstractions and complexity to your code has to come with a benefit. The (facebook/twitter API) example was well chosen. Joshua was "fabulous (tm)", good thing Stephan was there to keep him in check! :P
Rating: 5 of 5 
(08.Jun.2012)
Scalability issues: cure first, prevent later
Great content, great presentation skills! Very positive and inspiring. Here is someone who has a story to tell and tells it well. I loved your short anecdotes, it gives you credibility and it's very entertaining. "Cure first, prevent later" is a motto that applies more to Operations than Developers though, but seeing as that is your background: great! Will you be back next year? :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2012)
Composer: Project Dependency Management for PHP
Good, well paced presentation. Examples were practical and useful. I'm eager to start with Composer now.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Jun.2013)
Unbreakable Domain Models
Good talk. I liked the focus on testing. I think you dealt with the questions from the audience nicely.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Jun.2013)
Surviving a Prime Time TV Commercial
Good talk. I liked the real world example.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Jun.2013)
PHP, Under The Hood
I wasn't expecting such a strong focus on PHP's compiler but a good talk regardless.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Jun.2013)
Dependency Injection Smells
I liked the opening slides of 'what is a dependency'. I do feel like the real-world examples were unnecessary. The interface mistake in Symfony looks more like a bad refactor (find-replace) than a real mistake. And Zend\Crypt just looks poorly designed. I think you could add some made up examples that look like cases you found in the real-world, but are simplified. We just want to know how to spot the smells, not rant at how bad other people's code is. I like how you handled questions from the audience. I did notice a lack of a promised 'physical reaction' to seeing bad code, but I'll chalk that up to good presentation skills ;)
Rating: 1 of 5 
(07.Jun.2013)
Fun with BIG Data with various databases
You can not squish 3 hours of material in 45 minutes. Your opening slide looked absolutely horrendous (but I suppose that was the point?). It's fine to say you don't like Powerpoint but then you have to come up with something better. What you used instead looked like it was designed by a 15 year old who learned some 'cool CSS tricks' back in 2005 when rounded corners were hip. I understand you may need some functionality that Powerpoint doesn't have, but this was just not very good at all. Live demos are hard to do well. We don't really care that your query ran in exactly 0.14s, we'll take your word for it, just show us how you did it. Show us the difference between `big1` and `big2`. You seem to have a lot of expert knowledge on database systems, show us more of that and less messing about copy pasting queries in a command line.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Jun.2013)
Modern HTTP Architecture
Maybe change the title to 'API driven design'? If you're not keen on the term 'Service Oriented Architecture'. I think you were correct in identifying that PHP programmers don't like 'Enterprise' :) Over all I liked the talk. I liked your real world example. Good presentation style.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(24.Jun.2016)
Machine Learning for the rescue
I liked all the tools you listed to solve different kinds of machine learning problems. I do feel like there could be a bit more structure to the talk but overall I got something out of it.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.Jun.2016)
The Road to Technical Team Lead
This talk was great. Great presentation skills, good structure, good topic. I'm going to check out all the resources you mentioned on your slides.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(24.Jun.2016)
Integrating Bounded Contexts
I missed the point of this talk. I would have liked to see more about actual DDD. How you implement a traditional design in DDD? A minor gripe is that for every code sample you mentioned that it is 'simple', ok, now show me a not so simple example. Also you mentioned some unresolved problems such as transactionality when storing messages to multiple systems (MySQL & ElasticSearch)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(24.Jun.2016)
Hacking your way to better security
Good talk, great slides, good presentation style. Sadly for me it was too basic. '"better" security' implies an advanced talk but this was an entry level talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
Keynote: Beyond Code
Great talk. I've been thinking about my 'real' skills personally so it came at an opportune moment. I've been in the business for a few years and I've noticed that real solutions require both a technological approach and a human approach. This talk helped me streamline some of thoughts I've been having.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
XP in Practise
I liked the talk. I like the anecdotes and the fairly concrete set of rules that explain why you decided to use XP. I think I understand them well enough to bring them into practice myself. Good start, good finish but the middle bit where you dive into the matter of the book was a little dry. I think you can leave that out entirely without diminishing the integrity of the talk. Maybe you could pivot the talk a little bit towards using XP to solve specific issues. Personally I don't see XP as something that you should do always all the time; and since most people are not doing XP focusing on strong reasons to start dabbling with XP might be a good way to frame the talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
Introduction to the Semantic Web
The best talk of this covfefe. It's true.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
Caching with PSR-6 and PSR-16
I think the hammering down of 'rule 1' is a good indication of the level of experience of the speaker with the subject matter; which is to say that it's not very high. The mention of PSRs gave me hope that this would be an informative in-depth talk about caching. I honestly liked the history lesson, I think that was a good idea. The technical coverage of caching however seemed to be based a little too much on the PSRs. The PSRs cover just the interface and the interface of a caching system is quite simple. Caching as a technical tool however is very hard. Beyond stampeding no real technical challenges were covered and the coverage of stampeding could have used a little more explanation. The slide with the moving timeline .. that's a bad slide. I think it would be a good idea to have a slide that shows a timeline where stampeding happens and then a slide where stampede is averted. Also there was no code sample that shows stampede avoidance. Presentation style could also use a little more work. The hammering of rule 1 becomes extra annoying if you're stumbling over the words. Maybe if this talk was 20 minutes, it would be ok but for 45 minutes there just isn't enough information.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
Succeeding as an Introvert
Great talk. I think it fit in well with the other talks about 'soft' skills without overlapping. I think the anecdotes were the strongest part of this talk. Your great presentation style also helps tremendously.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
The first few milliseconds of HTTPS
The amount and speed of information felt just right. The speaker felt very comfortable and knowledgeable about the topic.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
GraphQL is right in front of us, let's do it, with Symfony
I feel like this talk had all the bases covered. I now know what GraphQL is and why I would want to use it. I definitely think there is room for improvement though. Your speaking style did not feel comfortable and I missed some structure. Perhaps you could have also delved a little deeper into implementation specifics and characteristics of the resolvers.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
Database migrations with zero downtime
Solid talk. Very comfortable speaking style.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
M-M-M-Monads!
The live code refactoring was a good idea. I feel like I understand the concepts behind a 'Maybe' and a 'Many' and I now understand why I dislike jQuery so much.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
Empathy As A Service: Supporting Mental Health in the Tech Workplace
Just a great talk. It really felt like you knew what you wanted to deliver on. I was afraid it might be a talk about opinions or emotions but it wasn't that at all. It was facts all the way down. As some other people also mentioned, the slides could have used less words but in this case it didn't personally bother me.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
Tales from the wrong end
I was hoping for an edutaining story and you delivered.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
Golang for PHP developers: A practical introduction
This talked seemed to have all the bases covered. It was evident though that the speaker didn't have a lot of experience with Golang yet. Speaking style seemed a little rough.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(01.Jul.2017)
Voodoo PHP
Great talk. Definitely funny. Very insightful. Compared to other keynotes however it felt a little rough. I also wasn't really sure where the talk was going. We went from one code snippet to another without much context. Speaking style was a little rough.

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