Max Schwanekamp

@anaxamaxan

Talks

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Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Dec.2012)
Building a Firehose
Very interesting talk, never thought it could be such an interesting topic. I don't know why, but I kept mentally applying the info to collecting data from a droid army, but I suppose it could be from a delivery fleet or distributed mobile app, etc. Excellent job.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Dec.2012)
Your code sucks, let’s fix it.
Fantastic talk, and as others noted the pacing was great. Rafael is really good at this live online conference format.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.Dec.2012)
From POX to HATEOAS, A Real Company’s Journey Building a RESTful API
Great talk, good slides and pace. However unlike others I felt suddenly mystified about REST, which previously seemed fairly straightforward but now sounds like more like SOAP. Hrm. Still Luke did a good job diving into the intricacies.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.Dec.2012)
Cryptography For The Average Developer
Overall a great talk. 5 thumbs for content, 3 presentation style. I found a couple times the emphasis on "No, seriously, don't do it" and "Leave it to the experts" a bit distracting – I had to think a moment "wait, don't do what?" or "leave what to the experts?" Not a bit deal, but it could have been toned down for clarity without a loss of impact.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.Dec.2012)
Designing Beautiful Software
Really great talk, with good example in the latter half. I'd rate it a 5, but the analogy at the beginning was a bit overwrought. The analogy could've been made much more quickly, with more time given to the business of software craft - particularly some of the TDD bits seemed a bit abbreviated.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(21.Dec.2012)
Javascript Best Practices & BackboneJS for the PHP Developer
This was a great talk and very informative as others have said. For me, the first part seemed too detailed and basic, so that in the second half Ryan seemed to be rushing. Also the title was rather misleading, as the Backbone part was more like an addendum. I had expected a more significant part of the talk to be about the integration of Backbone with a project running PHP serverside. In the end it was mainly some tips in that regard, and a link to @funkatron's talk on the topic.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Mar.2013)
Learning how to learn
Great keynote. The conference attendees as parasite-ridden sheep analogy was hilarious, and the points about learning strategies were very interesting. Joel's keynote was a perfect start to our collective dipping experience.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(02.Mar.2013)
Database Optimization for Web Developers
Learned a lot from this talk, but since the talk was pretty MySQL-specific anyway (also Maria/Percona) it would've been nice to get some more specific info about basic tuning my.cnf params for a web developer. As it stands, this talk could definitely fit into a single session.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Mar.2013)
Enterprise PHP Architecture through Design Patterns and Modularization
Fantastic talk. The perfect balance of humor, general concepts and code examples. Aaron is obviously a practiced speaker.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(03.Mar.2013)
Using Backbone.js in a PHP Environment
Ken introduced Backbone in a very straightforward and accessible way. Pace was too slow, and the example code was overly simplistic. Based on the title, I would've expected this to be more like an intermediate-level talk about the interaction between PHP and Backbone (or other clientside frameworks), not an intro. There was very little here specific to PHP. For example, do Backbone models have any relation to a model (data object or other) in PHP? Do we validation code between PHP and Backbone? Are templates necessarily static, or are they created as PHP output? And so on. As a final difficulty, Ken's mic was rubbing against his sweater, causing aural distraction for many in the room. My low rating for this talk is meant as hopefully constructive criticism. It could be a great presentation.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Mar.2013)
Refactoring 101
Fantastic talk. Engaging, confident style coupled with code and good explanations. The very end felt rushed, which was to be expected since Adam was squeezing a longer talk into a shorter timeframe. I would've loved for this one to be a double session. The parts about code smells (e.g. inappropriately sharing private parts!) was entertaining while at the same time quite informative.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(03.Mar.2013)
Deploying PHP on PaaS: Why & How
This was an interesting talk, once the microphone buzz stopped. It was too long on the old days, and seemed to just sort of stop before jumping to the present. I guess the point was something like the more things change, the more they stay the same -- with each new attempt to reduce complexity and potential for error adding more complexity. That is, until now, with the advent of PaaS. Somehow this struck me as a self-defeating narrative. In any case, this would have been more appropriate as a session topic, not a keynote. It could have been made more keynote-like by talking about the general trends in web development, through a PHP lens, and how "old" tech has improved (e.g. current VPS offerings) and new tech is emerging (cloud, multilingual applications, etc) to address and interact with those trends. Just a suggestion.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(03.Mar.2013)
Don't be STUPID, Grasp SOLID
Very engaging speaker, great topic. Some code examples would help make it more relatable to real-world PHP. It seemed a little short, so probably the talk would only benefit from spending some time with the code.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Mar.2013)
Scaling PHP with HipHop
Wow, that was a great talk. Really skilled speaker. I honestly expected to find very little that would be relevant to my small business web development work, but Sara successfully and humorously transmitted an enthusiasm and understanding (high level) for what HipHop is doing and I found a lot to be quite relevant even for my small team.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(03.Mar.2013)
Cryptography for the Average Developer
Great talk and a strong speaker, but a bit short and lacking in real code examples. Some examples of good and bad approaches would help the audience catch up with and better understand the whirlwind of information.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Mar.2013)
Building Testable PHP Applications
This was definitely another of those should've-been-a-double-session talks. Still, an awesome talk and very clearly presented. I'm finally getting it with building testable applications, thanks to Chris' efforts and today's talk really drove it home for me. +1 on Tyler's comments - the phone-for-remote thing was occasionally odd, especially since the regular remotes that others were using include a laser pointer, eliminating the need to use a hand to point out parts of the code on screen.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(23.Aug.2013)
Practical Refactoring
An informative and smooth talk. Stefan is clearly comfortable speaking. I liked the code examples, especially going from really old style php to something more modern. But that's the one gripe I have too - "practical" means "doing." More practical code examples would make this an even better talk. Stefan mentioned PHP Storm's use in refactoring; again it would be great to have some more specific examples, maybe a short demonstration using it.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Mar.2014)
Laravel 4: Queue Deep Dive
Awesome talk. Taylor moved at a good clip, didn't get bogged down by anything. It was apparent that he had prepared for the talk well, so he kept a good pace and still was paying attention to questions/comments in irc. He even had the group doing a little live interaction with his live coding. We'll definitely be using queues in all php projects, Laravel or not, going forward.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(17.May.2014)
What's Wrong With It?
Great talk, and excellent as an intro to the conference. That said, it seemed kind of unfocused. It seemed like Jeffrey, who is so concise and organized in his videos, wasn't quite sure what to say (!) so he scattershot a bunch of cool stuff in Laravel. I definitely learned about some new things from that scattershot, but I was wishing he would have just chosen 3 or so of those cool things and focused on those.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
AWS For Artisans
So yeah, it was a little bit AWS infomercial, but it was a good one! Jeremy has a solid style and good pacing. The only strike against it is that he managed to make an extremely simple "upload funny faces" app seem extremely complex by pulling as many AWS products as possible. Still, it was extremely informative.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Async PHP With React
Great talk, super informative, good style, much wow. Loved the Commodore Vic-20 style headings.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Laravel.IO: A Use-Case Architecture
Shawn really nailed it with this talk. He turned me the concept of "commands" in a way that I don't think would come across in a book or blog post. I was also kinda blown away with the level of professionalism he shows - which was only enhanced by his humble qualifiers. I'm really looking forward to watching it again when the conference video comes out.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Open Source & Your Business
Ian is a guy who walks his talk, and then some. This talk was more editorial than lesson, but that's a good thing. And I was truly inspired by the level of support that Userscape has given to Laravel and open source software. That was true before Ian's talk, but even more so after the talk. I hope to get our company to take up his call to action of devoting developer time to Laravel and other FOSS projects.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Building Equality
Kayla did a great job of highlighting one of the elephants in the room - the extreme gender disparity. Out of 250 or so developers in the room, I heard a count of 7 of them were women. It's an industry problem and it's education problem, but those of in the industry already can start by paying attention to articulate, intelligent developers like Kayla.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Keynote
I love how excited Taylor clearly was about this project, and how he occasionally would ask in this understated way "What do you guys think? Is this cool?" Once we started to grok what the whole thing is, I was blown away, especially by Forge. Taylor has a great stage presence, and is quiet enthusiasm is infectious.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Breaking The Mold
Having read Code Bright I was a little worried this would be quite basic. But far from it, this talk was filled with exactly the kind of stuff I like to see at a conference. A new approach to code organization, new concepts directly relevant to my professional work, and a guy with an interesting accent. That snarling doge/red panda photoshop was shocking. :)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Hexagonal Architecture
Lucky for me Patrick Noonan @devopat wrote out my exact feelings about this talk. I think it was little overly ambitious for the timeframe available. Chris did a good job tackling the topic, and he clearly presented a case for keeping application layers separate, but maybe get a longer time slot or pare down the information included. Btw, I kept thinking of The Octagon, a Chuck Norris B-grade movie from when I was a kid, which popularized ninja. Seems like a possible humorous tie-in.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Devs And Depression
I almost skipped this talk, and yet by the end it had me (and the person next to me!) in tears. Jeff Way's assessment that it's "TED-quality" is spot on. One tiny thing to add to Greg's presentation: Laravel is largely about Developer Happiness, and by extension developer *wellness* - so really this talk was directly related to the conference topic. 6 thumbs up!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Hacking CS Education
I'll probably get flamed for this, but I was a little annoyed by this talk. With all due respect to John Resig who is 100 times more the developer than I'll ever be, I did not understand how this was relevant at a conference for professional PHP developers with a specific interest in the Laravel framework. It was impressive, and like many others with kids I signed up for Khan Academy that same day. But unlike the Amazon AWS talk, there wasn't even an attempt to make it relevant for a room full of developers focused on a backend framework, some of whom came thousands of miles to learn more in relation to Laravel. The presentation was smooth, polished and compelling. I just felt its inclusion was based more on John's profile than on the presentation content.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.May.2014)
Cal Evans
This was a great closing talk. Like the cleanup hitter in a baseball game, Cal knows what he's doing, and delivers. It was great for a closing talk because as he expressed so well, simply having a job and getting paid does not a professional make. He then went on to lay out a simple plan to achieve what he's defining as professionalism. And who couldn't love a catchy acronym like DUCCHT?
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Feb.2015)
Advanced Git Skills
Excellent talk. A little fast at the end due to time running short, but I really learned a lot. Lorna's speaking style is excellent.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(05.Feb.2015)
My App Is Secure...I Think
Wim clearly knows what he's talking about, and I seriously learned a lot, especially in the latter half. He answered questions very well too. But I have to give this talk 3 stars for two reasons: 1. The first hour (of 2.5 hours) was dedicated to code that was clearly ancient. mysql_escape_string() and addslashes()? While yes, we need to know about SQL injection, but manually concatenating SQL strings with unescaped user input is definitely not mainstream anymore. Other code examples appeared to be coming from phpBB or something similarly outdated. Maybe that code is still out there, but is that what we current developers are at risk of building now? I doubt it. How is this relevant, for example, to my REST API using oAuth authentication? 2. More time and detail could have been given to techniques for dealing with a breach after it has already happened. How to avoid it in future? What are some possible consequences long-term? How to convince stakeholders to spend money on security-related infrastructure, etc.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
PHP and teams, it's good chemistry!
First Rasmus talk I've attended live. Great stuff overall.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
Developer Experience In The PHP World
Really great topic, and Ryan is an excellent speaker. So much good here, inspiring, The easy & simple distinction felt a little artificial though, and Ryan himself tripped on it a few times in the talk. The distinction is a good one, but maybe make it in another way? Still, the talk was great regardless. Also (as I tweeted yesterday) I keep wondering about the relationship of documentation and developer trust. For example Laravel has pretty good docs, but there are some undocumented bits that come up surprisingly often. Once I realized that, I started distrusting the docs, which detracts from the DX Laravel otherwise excels at. Not to criticize Laravel or Ryan here, just a thought that this talk brought up for me.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
Your API Is Bad And You Should Feel Bad
I thought this was a very good talk, maybe I generally like Ben's approach based around pragmatism and standards rather than an emphasis on "do A, B and C and your API will be awesome." I would have liked to see some more specificity, either in code examples or in case stories (1-2, given that's only an hour), but I got a lot from this talk regardless.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
Tuning Nginx And PHP-FPM The Right Way
Awesome talk. Amazing amount of actionable info in the short time available. Exactly what I was hoping for.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
Symfony2 - The Very Basics
Wow, great talk. I really feel like I got a good tour of Symfony. Clearly it was a toe-dipping, but I think that was the point, and Margaret made Symfony seem less like an imposing edifice of enterprisey befuddlement and more like "hey, here's this amazing tool that's easy to use, and there's great docs and friendly folks to help."
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
Action Domain Responder A Refinement of MVC
First time hearing Paul Jones speak, and now I understand why I see his name on so many conference rosters. Paul literally got me thinking about the request-response cycle in a whole new way as he gave the talk.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
How a team can make or break a startup.
Very professional and polished, but it felt like Poorinam's treatment of creating company culture is too much rooted in startup culture, and ultimately to some extent it seemed like her solution to when things go sour is "our way or the highway" masked in potentially self-serving rhetoric that it would be better for the out-of-sync team member's own needs. That has greater validity if you're under 30, have no dependents, financial resources to cushion a fall and a skillset that is in high demand immediately - in short, if you're an entitled young professional.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
Machine Learning: Or How To Build SkyNet On Your Lunch Break
Really excellent talk. Kayla has a way of making difficult topics feel accessible, and that she's like, one of us and reporting her findings to us. In a way, that's what a conference should be - professionals reporting on the results of their striving in our shared profession. Only thing to change would be to add some specific examples of code and/or the math involved. Even if it's in Ruby!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
REST API Best Practices
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
Introduction To Continuous Integration With Jenkins
Good talk, very informative. Delivery a little slow, but the info was great. I liked the emphasis on QA tools in combination with Jenkins, but some might have a problem with that if they already use those tools. Still, I learned a lot.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Feb.2015)
How To Cope When It All Hits the Fan
Seriously energizing presentation. Eryn is amazingly good at this. Plus the info plays in directly both our needs as a growing company, and with HIPAA privacy & security policies we're working on as well. Thanks!
Rating: 0 of 5 
(08.Feb.2015)
Wrangle Cross-Cutting Concerns With Event Driven Programming
Super clear and well-paced. Very accessible approach to looking at cyclomatic complexity and how event-driven programming can help with good separation of concerns. Chris is one of those people who are soft-spoken, but what they're saying has 100:0 signal:noise ratio.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(08.Feb.2015)
Down the Rabbit Hole: Lessons Learned combining Career and Community.
The cleanup hitter does it again. He's such a well practiced speaker, it's really quite something to see Cal Evans do his Thing in person. And yes, Cal has successfully inspired this guy to get involved with the local PHP community!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Sep.2015)
Wax On, Wax Off: Code Kata Dojo
This workshop was worth the price of the conference. I had long shied away from code kata out of a fear of spinning my wheels without knowing what to do. This workshop was a great introduction to a practice that seems both beneficial and just a fun challenge. It ties in nicely with Adam Culp's earlier workshop, which emphasized the value of iteration in application development.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Sep.2015)
Clean Application Development
An excellent workshop. I try not to give out "5/5" ratings too easily, but this was a solid presentation for a surprisingly "soft" topic.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Sep.2015)
Inside Laravel 5.1
We use Laravel 4 and 5 every day, and I still got a number of useful things from this talk. I'd love to see Yitz develop a larger talk/workshop on just using Command Bus architecture.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Sep.2015)
Open Source, Love, and Social Responsibility
A very good talk, and quite inspiring as a keynote should be. My only gripe is that it seemed like some of the analogies Davey made weren't entirely logically sound. Not a big deal, but as a logic guy it grated a little bit. Still, overall it was a very good talk and helps underline that we developers are not somehow removed from the social problems of the real world.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(12.Sep.2015)
Vim: Not Your Grandpa's Editor
This was a hastily-prepared talk of course, admittedly. I learned some things here. I think this talk has the potential to become great, with a little humor, and some more real-world usage -- much like some of the git talks that are making the rounds lately. I would have liked to see demonstrations of how some of vim's features are useful, and rather than reading a list of options, hone it down to 2-4 really super useful options and provide a link to a sample .vimrc file. I use puphpet, which has an included .vimrc with good comments for many of the options.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Sep.2015)
Talmudic Maxims to Maximize Your Growth as a Software Developer
Wow, it's understandable how @coderabbi has become a PHP superstar lately. This talk spoke to me not just as a developer, but as a human being. I was actually a bit cynical and almost skipped it due to the hype I've heard from others around this talk, but honestly it deserves the hype. Yitz, put together a video training series!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Sep.2015)
Battled-hardened Laravel: Lessons in Scale
This is a talk with great potential, just needs some more editing. I loved hearing about how to optimize for tests, especially rather slow-running functional tests. Most of this had little to do with Laravel though. This talk maybe should be refactored to focus more on Laravel-specific (or PHP-specific) issues, *or* broaden to a talk about PHP deployment at scale. Still, I learned a lot and had some concrete take-aways by the end.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(12.Sep.2015)
Foundations of Zend Framework 2
I felt like for this talk Adam optimized for completeness rather than impact on this one. There were some stretches that could have been skipped, because in 50 minutes there isn't time to cover all configuration options. I would have rather seen some more demo, less thorough touching on all configuration options. (This is one of the costs of config over convention after all -- so many options!). All this said, I do feel like I have a better handle on ZF2 now, and may even try it as a basis for a future project partly as a result of this talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Sep.2015)
Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community
As a partner decision-maker at my small company, this talk helped remind/push me into doing the right thing for our employees and the company. This is indeed a devervedly famous talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Sep.2015)
An Introduction to Containers and Docker for PHP Developers
Very interesting talk. Robert has a great speaking voice and manner, the kind of guy you want teaching the team. Or the conference session, in this case. I loved that he spent most of the time on the command line, narrating. Like a tutorial video, but with the in-person conference advantage that we could ask questions as it happens. My only complaint is that Robert spent a little too much time explaining how he was doing things "not the regular way." That said, it was minimal, and this talk was top-notch.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Sep.2015)
Stronger Than Ever: Into the Future, Together
Great talk. Sara is so ridiculously intelligent that her off-script parentheticals make a "prepared speech" come alive. Thanks!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Sep.2015)
Async PHP with ReactPHP
Excellent talk. Amazingly, I came away from this 1 hour talk with a much better understanding of ReactPHP. Jeremy's delivery was rapid yet consistently clear. Great code samples!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(13.Sep.2015)
Redis
A good talk, needs some demos and/or real-world usages. I think this would make more impact if we got a taste of what it's like to work with Redis in 2-3 common scenarios. But this talk did give me more confidence in Redis' value as more than just a session storage backend, so I'll be expanding my usage of Redis as a result.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Sep.2015)
Hello, PSR-7
Excellent talk on what could've been an extremely dull topic. But Beau made it both relevant and interesting. I look forward to when PSR-7 is the norm the way that PSR-4 autoloading is becoming the norm now.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
The Code Manifesto: Empowering Our Community
Fantastic talk! Kayla comes off as humble and approachable, yet concerned and knowledgeable not to mention experienced. I loved how she brought it around to an example of her own bias in action.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
Building Great APIs
A great talk, considering the time constraint. I would've liked some more practical examples, but maybe that would be a workshop and not a talk. Still, Ben wasted no time, delivers like a pro, and handled questions gracefully. I liked that he didn't fixate on a particular standard (e.g. JSONAPI or HAL), but stuck to presenting the concepts.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
Data Structures in PHP
Interesting topic, but about halfway through I was starting to dream...oh wait, what? I was starting to fall asleep. Flashbacks to undergraduate lecture halls... Perhaps this talk could be improved by focusing on fewer structures and how they're useful, instead of attempting a catalog of all the useful structures. Practical code examples and a few images, or perhaps a story of how a particular structure was useful to you personally, would've made this more engaging.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
ELK: Ruminating on logs
Interesting talk, and Mathew is a great speaker. I'd love to see another of his talks. The only downside of this talk is endemic to the topic itself - there's sort of a bewildering array of components and plugins connected with the ELK stack. I came away from the talk feeling more informed as a developer, but as part of a small business I'm now also more hesitant to jump in.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Polyglot Persistence - using the best DB for the job
While the talk title should've been "SQL bad. Graph good! Document and KVs too!" nevertheless I loved the balance of high level concepts and code samples. I'd give this 5 stars, but the presentation was a bit dry and the docker part was a distraction.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Rethinking Loops
Very much enjoyed this talk. Great use of code to illustrate the points. I liked how he focused on PHP, but made analogies/connections with other contexts. John's a great speaker, though a touch on the quiet side so maybe a mic would be helpful for a larger audience like this one had. I came away from this talk feeling [even more] enthusiastic about applying a functional paradigm to my code.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Manage Your Content with Elasticsearch
Samantha obviously knows this subject thoroughly, and yet she made Elasticsearch seem accessible and easily implemented (at least for exploratory purposes). I'm a huge fan of code in presentations, and especially live coding, and I very much appreciated her use of curl to show what Elasticsearch is doing. Near the end of the talk, I immediately went looking for the slides on her website. I'd love to attend the full workshop version of this talk.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Caching Best Practices
As a speaker, Eli is confident and entertaining. This talk however should've been simply titled Intro to Memcached, as it mainly consisted of enumerating the various php methods for interacting with memcache, along with some "don't do that" statements - usually with little or no explanation. For example he states that filesystem caching is very common, but a bad idea, and then moves on. I can speculate that this is due to disk i/o speeds, yet I'm skeptical of that in the context of a php application. He didn't even mention Redis, which is often used in place of memcached. His code samples were crazy nested loops and conditionals, which in combination with the examples from Digg gave the talk a feeling of being outdated php4-era information.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(16.Sep.2016)
Test, Create, Secure, Repeat
4.5 more accurately. Great class. I feel much more confident now about how to proceed with adding tests for an existing legacy application. There was some difficulty following along some of the examples when it wasn't clear we were moving on to the next step (represented by a git branch in the class repo). But Michelangelo is such an experienced speaker he kept us moving and following along just fine anyway.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(16.Sep.2016)
Here Be Dragons! What It's Really Like to Slay a Monolith
Loved hearing the real-world experiences. Very clear slides supporting the talk itself. The only negative is that at the end I wasn't clear how the eponymous monolith was actually slain so much as replaced. Still, good info and and a great speaker.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(16.Sep.2016)
Building Simple Microservices Using Slim 3.0
Good introductory info about Slim - I definitely plan to look at Slim for future API projects. Ashley clearly knows her shit, but was just as clearly extremely nervous and was occasionally unclear as a result. With some practice and refinement this could be a very good introduction to Slim.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Sep.2016)
Why Your Mobile Website Matters
This talk blew me away, especially because the title sounds frankly uninteresting. But it was a total wake-up call. Robert's an awesome speaker, and the facts presented are compelling. Fantastic.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Sep.2016)
Graph Databases Will Change Your Freaking Life
I've never seen Ed do a non-OSMI talk before. He's awesome! I just wish he would've had more time. Excellent talk, really got the point across in the limited time (graph dbs rock), and people all around the venue are talking about it over lunch so clearly I'm not alone in that opinion.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(03.Feb.2017)
From SQL to noSQL
Great info, Derick obviously is very knowledgeable and approachable. I and others apparently missed some critical piece of the initial setup, so it was very difficult getting going with the first exercise in the time allotted. However, the concepts were clear enough, and I'm excited to try Mongo in my next project.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Feb.2017)
Don't work for PHPCS, make PHPCS work for you
Superb talk! Juliette is an excellent speaker, great use of slides to illustrate points visually, and managed to make a great presentation in spite of multiple technical issues outside of her control. She presented a thorough overview of phpcs, and illustrated how it would be useful and implemented into existing projects. I've always shied away from phpcs as being overly 'fiddly' but this presentation made it clear how accessible the tool really is. Thanks!
Rating: 2 of 5 
(04.Feb.2017)
Baby Steps -> Giant Leaps. (Xdebug for beginners)
I *did* get xDebug working correctly in my environment for the first time while attending this presentation, but I felt like far too much time was spent on the speaker introducing himself and on the "where to install" part of the talk. Those could have been 2 minutes and 5 minutes respectively, and then we could have gotten a more thorough introduction to the kinds of things xDebug is helpful with, how it differs from other tools such as phpcs and Blackfire, and common gotchas. None of that was addressed in this talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Feb.2017)
The New Revolution
Awesome keynote. Is @ieatkillerbees the next Cal Evans of the PHP speaking world?! Very inspiring in any case. I feel like it got a little muddy at the end, a little too much "holy crap bad things can happen" and maybe a little more "bad things like $scaryAnecdote can happen, but because the team treated their profession with awareness of their role in the larger scheme of things, $inspiringAnecdote is possible." Just a thought, the talk was excellent regardless.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Feb.2017)
MySQL: Analysis, understanding, and optimization of queries
Thorough presentation, engaging speaker. Really great job!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(04.Feb.2017)
Pulling up Your Legacy App by its Bootstraps!
This was an interesting talk, but I felt too much time was spent on the specifics of the application domain, and too little time on the strategies on *how* the legacy application was 'bootstrapped'. For example, I didn't even realize that "Events" mentioned in the earlier presentation was referring to Event Sourcing until nearly the end of the presentation. Also, the linked slides are missing some of the code shown in the actual presentation. But Emily clearly knows her stuff, so maybe with some polishing this could be a top-notch talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(04.Feb.2017)
Websockets and Event-driven Programming with ReactPHP
Demo github: https://github.com/stevecoug/reactphp-demo Informative talk. I'm excited to try this out. Talk style was a bit dry, and sometimes the presentation sequence seemed somewhat disjointed. Definitely worthwhile though, and I especially liked the "things can go wrong" part at the end.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Feb.2017)
Securing Legacy Applications
Amazingly helpful talk. Chris' presentation was super thorough, and his presentation style is great. Unlike most other talks where I took a few notes here and there, I was typing out notes pretty much the whole time he was talking. This talk could easily be expanded to a 3-hour tutorial.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Feb.2017)
Unit Testing by Example
Great talk, well-organized and accessible. I've been doing tests for some time, and I still got a lot out of this and at the same time it was obviously accessible to beginners too.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Sep.2017)
Guide to UX Testing with Assistive Technology
This was a fascinating talk, and honestly this tutorial alone was worth the price of the conference. I hope Andrea either makes this available as a purchase-able video tutorial, or does it again at Nomad or similar online venue. The only negative on this talk was that there was a bit too much time given to what began to feel like a sales pitch for Apple products because of their support for a11y features. But that's nitpicking tbh. I'm excited to learn more about a11y issues.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Sep.2017)
Getting More Out Of Git
Great talk, Jordan is a super competent speaker, interesting and funny. I improved my grasp of concepts I'd taken for granted (e.g. git reset) and ones I'd avoided (cherry-pick). Oddly enough, Jordan made it clear before the conference and at the start of the talk that this tutorial would not be an intro to git, and then he started with an intro to git. Granted, it was laying groundwork for some of followed, it seemed like a quick reminder "git is distributed - see?" would have been adequate. More importantly there were a number of times when Jordan made a mistake and got confused, and then we the audience got lost as a result. Probably just need to practice the sequence of commands a few times. This is more like 4.5 star talk, only giving 4 because everyone else give him 5.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(19.Apr.2018)
Pentesting For Developers
There was some good information here, but honestly I was expecting a _tutorial_, not just a series of challenges. This was more like where the cartoon dad says "you can die in water. Your life may depend on learning to swim" and you understand and then he just throws you into the pool and says "ok, now swim!". I tried participating at first, but it quickly became apparent that this was not a tutorial session so much as a "fun session" for developers already familiar to some extent with pentesting. I've seen Chris speak previously and was blown away with his presentation so maybe my hopes were set too high, but this one was disappointingly disorganized and under developed.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Apr.2018)
Essential AWS for PHP Applications
Solid talk, clearly communicated. Would've liked a little more info relevant to php applications specifically, but given the time constraint this was a great talk that made the oft-confusing AWS configuration clearer for me.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Apr.2018)
Securing Legacy Applications
Great talk! Chris is an awesome speaker, successfully communicating a sense of what’s at stake and some clearly achievable steps developers can take to mitigate some of the threats. I particularly liked being reminded that attackers don’t usually stay within the bounds of your app to find your application’s security weaknesses.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Apr.2018)
Listen to the Difference: Using a Screenreader to Compare Before/After Code of 5 Top a11y Barriers
Focused talk that illustrated how screenreaders interact with web pages and simple changes we can make to our HTML output to improve screenread users' experience. One thing I'd wish for is incorporating a mobile device screenreader to experience.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Apr.2018)
Practical hands-On Accessibility Testing
Amazing tutorial! Lots of non-obvious information and insights that aren't just easily obtained via web search - exactly the reason for attending a live training event like this. I've derived so many actionable tasks from this talk, it was honestly worth the price of attending this conference. The only change I'd suggest is adding a mobile device component to the tutorial.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Apr.2018)
Simplified Continuous Deployment with Laravel and Jenkins
Concise, clear and uh, rapid. A big part of how we devs learn is by simply going through the experience, and Margaret's talk compressed what would otherwise be a dull multiple-hours process into an entertainingly humorous 40 minutes. It would have been nice to have time for questions inline with the talk (I had a couple during the talk, but Margaret apparently did not notice my hand up; maybe others did too?) instead of saving all questions for the end. Also, if this is "CD with Laravel" it might be worthwhile to address Forge and Envoyer, which are quite commonly used in the Land of Laravel.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(16.Sep.2018)
Going Bare - Writing The Web Without A Framework
This talk was one of the highlights of the conference for me. It got me thinking completely differently about modernizing our legacy apps. Sammy is obviously very a practiced speaker, his style is engaging and clear. The only thing I would change about the talk is to have a little less emphasis on the _why_ and a little more on the _how_ but that's honestly a quibble in the context of a 50 minute talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(16.Sep.2018)
Serverless PHP applications
+1 on Steve's comment. Not only did Matthieu present this in an understandable manner, he was reasonably thorough in addressing implementation concerns and realistic about some of the tradeoffs involved with the serverless paradigm.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(16.Sep.2018)
Code Review: For Me & You
Great talk, somewhat amazing amount of info for a 25 minute slot. Only reason I give 4 instead of 5 is that Steve's verbal examples seemed to conflict significantly with the content of the slides. In particular, he used a lot of direct "you/you're" examples that were bordering on accusatory ("you're just wrong" or something to that effect). I think Steve was being casual and "real world" but especially in light of the preceding talk (The Monster on the Project) I experienced some cognitive dissonance during Steve's talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(16.Sep.2018)
Code is Not Neutral: Ethics for Developers
Great talk, but I do think the latter was a bit heavy-handed. I mean, I completely agree with the views presented, but I felt like we went from Ethics for Developers to instead Political Considerations of Technology. We were skating Godwin's for quite a while there.

Events They'll Be At

No events so far

Events They Were At

SunshinePHP 2017 Feb 02, 2017
PNWPHP 2016 Sep 15, 2016
Midwest PHP 2016 Mar 04, 2016
SunshinePHP 2015 Feb 05, 2015
Laracon NYC May 15, 2014
MidwestPHP Conference Mar 02, 2013
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