Eric Poe

@eric_poe

Talks

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Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Mar.2013)
Preparing To Speak
Fabulous speaker! Although the audience is tech-oriented, the content is valuable for all non-tech presentations I've attended.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Mar.2013)
Worst Case Scenario
Great use talk with good use of personal examples.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.Jul.2013)
Creating Realtime Applications with PHP and Websockets
Very cool topic! I must watch again and read your source to learn more!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Aug.2013)
Practical Refactoring
Practical examples and hammered in some TDD principals to boot! The topic was general enough that just about any developer could have followed the talk and come away with more. Well done!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Nov.2013)
More Code, More Problems
Darnit! I found myself taking notes and nodding, "yes, this->yes!"
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Dec.2013)
Scaling PHP with HipHop
Wow! Great info! Sara is very approachable and quite knowledgeable. Excellent talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(20.Dec.2013)
Unit testing PHP apps with PHPUnit
Well done. I appreciated the inclusion of the OWASP Top 10 as a source of things to test.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Dec.2013)
WordPress and Automated Testing, Really?!
Good job with going into PHPUnit and Selenium. The WP testing was a nice extra.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Dec.2013)
Guiding Object-Oriented Design with Tests
Calmly reasoned and well done. I entered this talk thinking object mocks were superfluous. Now, I see the light!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Dec.2013)
Why You Can't Test
Great talk!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Feb.2014)
Modern PHP
Good talk! I appreciated the historical perspective on PHP and seeing how programming practices in PHP have been improving and evolving through the past 1.5 decades that Ben has been involved in it. The talk was not in-depth, but Ben did a great job of acting as an index by providing links to further information for the modern topics he introduced.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.Apr.2014)
Foundations Workshop
The curriculum is a good introduction to PHP. Given the slow WiFi, I was grateful for the complimentary flash drive that contained all of the files we needed. The difficulties that I saw were primarily in getting everyone's development environment set up. Vagrant is a great choice for modern machines, but there were a few older laptops that may or may not have had the option to enable VT-X in the BIOS. Perhaps for future workshops, a fallback of XAMPP and MAMP should be provided. Davey did a great job of calmly walking us through the lessons and explaining concepts when questions were raised. Elizabeth's infectious enthusiasm for web security made us all fear evil monkeys (aka: malicious users). Matt Frost and Michelle Sanver did a great job in their support role, though I would have loved to hear more from them, too. Thanks for open sourcing the curriculum, I plan to introduce it to my local PUG as an option for some of our future workshops.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Jun.2014)
Functional PHP
Excellent talk. Larry was able to take some pretty complex topics and reduce them down to digestible ideas. The concepts were challenging, but Larry has an infectious enthusiasm that makes me want to learn more about the topic. Bring on the functional PHP!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2014)
Secure Password Hashing: It’s Not Just For Experts Anymore
I appreciated the discussion about password hashing and Jeremy's introduction to his libraries that build on the PHP password hashing functions. I much better understand password_hash() after listening to Jeremy's talk and playing with password_hash in 3v4l.org.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(04.Dec.2014)
Automating DB changes with Phinx
Well done! Since my team are about to migrate data from an old site to a new site, this talk was timely. Phinx looks like an interesting tool to look into in more detail. You did a great job of discussing the alternative ways we all do data migration before launching into what makes Phinx such an interesting tool. I appreciate that you mentioned at least one room-for-improvement in Phinx. You also recognized a missing slide near the end (Phinx status after a rollback). This talk just needs a little bit of polish to be perfect. Good job!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Jan.2015)
Build Promotion with Jenkins
This was a timely talk since I have been tasked with looking at getting our Bamboo CI server to more easily deploy our code and spin up new, yet temporary snapshots. Learning what Kevin is doing with Jenkins and how he's doing it has given me better insight into what I can and should do with our Bamboo server.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Jan.2015)
Working with dates and times in PHP
John has an easy-going, relaxed delivery and treats all questions and audience members with respect. During portions of this talk, members asked questions and John casually answered the questions by firing up an example on-the-fly. This was a good introduction to DateTime as well as a good review. I appreciated that John also talked about DateTimeImmutable to answer a problem that I have encountered, too.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Jan.2015)
Tuning Nginx and PHP-FPM… The Right Way.
I have installed and used nginx for a project, but had never tweaked it to the extent described in this talk. It certainly gives me some ideas and settings to consider as well as some caveats to avoid.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Jan.2015)
/Regex makes me want to (weep|give up|(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻).?/i
Brett has an easy-going presentation on learning regex. I really appreciated the real-world, as opposed to hello-world, examples. Well done!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Feb.2015)
Functions, Part One: Your First Custom Function
John has a relaxed, yet informative style of presentation that quickly gets to the topic at hand without dealing with extraneous filler. Even though John's examples were in PHP, he highlighted 4 good rules for building a function in any language. This was a good presentation for the beginner as well as a nice refresher for the more experienced developer. John not only talked about what to do, but also why to do it.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Apr.2015)
Modern Debugging Strategies (or, what to do when your code plays tricks on you)
Well done. Dan started with the basics of print_r and var_dump and worked our way through xdebug and phpunit, 3rd party toolbars and services, and showed us psysh and other tools to make figuring out what is going on behind the scenes a little easier when things go wrong or go not quite as expected. I learned a few new things that I will need to revisit his slides to explore further.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Apr.2015)
Blackfire.io
John has an easy-going delivery that makes everything he describes approachable. This talk on Blackfire.io was no exception. John had a complex application already spun up to demonstrate the benefits of using Blackfire.io to supplement one's development process.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Apr.2015)
Getting Started with PHPUnit
Although I have used PHPUnit before and use it as part of my toolset at work, I have struggled with mocks in unit testing. Why should I mock? What the heck am I mocking? Matt answered these questions and even gave us various exercises in basic unit testing and mocking API calls. It was these mocking of API calls that drove the mocking point home for me. Matt has a great speaking voice, an easy-going presence, and a calm, intentional, manner of responding to questions and problems that arise.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.Apr.2015)
Wax On, Wax Off: Coder Dojo
I liked the concept of this workshop. I appreciate that the point was made several times that what we are dong in kata is learning concepts and we must decide what we are trying to learn. I have tried to make this point as well when leading a smaller kata workshop. The kata we worked on, Conway's Game of Life, seemed a bit daunting for a 30 minute kata exercise. However, the goal was not to complete the kata, but to learn along the way. I liked the lather/rinse/repeat-with-a-twist cycle; though in normal circumstances, I would probably do the next iteration of the kata on a different day rather than 30 minutes later. A HUGE thanks to the various folks who volunteered their time to act as helpers in this workshop! Overall, Yitzchok's delivery is calm and well-reasoned. I will be applying some of these concepts in a future workshop with my local PHP user group.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Apr.2015)
PHP Jeopardy
I had a great time as a contestant and as an audience member. The Jeremys and special guests did a great job of making this event fun and light-hearted. As a contestant, it was a little difficult for me to see the huge screens on either side of the stage since I was viewing them at an oblique angle. I listen to the podcasts, so was disappointed that I couldn't remember any of their names! Stage fright + performance anxiety = "duhhh" ... at least that's the excuse I'm sticking with.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Don't Fear the Regex
Regex has been big and scary until I sat through this talk. "Don't Fear the Regex" is an apt title and description for this talk. Sandy does a great job of slowly introducing the learner to some basics of Regex and building upon that to take us to a place where, although we are not experts, we are in a comfortable place to experiment with Regex. I felt comfortable enough with Regex in PHP after this talk that I was able to use it on the job for a recent ticket without having to search Stack Overflow first. Thanks, Sandy!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Building Rock Solid Software in the Real World
This was a talk that I hadn't originally planned to attend, but I had gotten caught up with an interesting conversation with someone in the same room. Yet, I am glad that I stayed for Omni's talk. I had previously attend a talk of Omni's on Phing via Nomad PHP, so my expectations were high. Omni does not disappoint. This talk was general enough for the beginner, yet hit some points that a more experienced PHP dev could take home. I was happy to see some good points on PHPUnit, as well as on Code Sniffer and other code quality tools that don't make the cover of PHP Cosmo.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Building Extraordinary Packages
I hadn't planned on attending this talk, but got caught up with some great conversations in the same room (hint to prospective LSP16 attendees, this is a good thing!) so stuck around to hear Phil's talk. "PHP TownHall," of which Phil is the more loquacious half, is one of my favorite podcasts, so I had high expectations for this talk. Phil disappoints on a grand scale, because he approaches his talks with gravitas and jocular sobriety. This talk emphasized not only code quality, but also documentation quality and PR (ie, Public Relations) quality. How one reacts to PRs (aka "pull requests') was also discussed. Phil spent much of his time talking about the important things that pajama-adorned developers rarely explore but should. Well done! For my internal corporate work that will never be seen by the public eye, these concepts are still important. My clients are not anonymous legions, but are instead folks that I know and respect. Their happiness matters to me! The documentation I provide, the feedback I respond to, and the announcements I make are as important as the code I provide. Serendipity led me to Phil's talk. I am glad that I attended.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Functional PHP
Hands down, this is one of the better talks I have attended. Larry's exudes infectious enthusiasm for functional programming. The end of the talk felt rushed, perhaps because Larry was telling us that he wanted to let us get to lunch on time (the BBQ'd meats getting set up outside our door smelled divine). I was happy to take his ideas and create my own pure function as part of a ticket I was working on at work. This function was not made purely to put into practice something I had learned at Lone Star. No, this function was created because it was the right thing to do. Thank you, Larry, for giving me the language to create this small piece of (dare I say?) genius. The ONLY thing I can suggest to make this talk better is to spend less time on the history of functional programming (aka Intro or Chapter 1 of any Functional Programming book) and spend more time on functional programming in PHP. I would attend this talk again.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Debugging Zen
First the negative: I was disappointed that this talk was not technical in nature. Xdebug, PHP, and I are terrible companions; though I hope to change this relationship in the next few months. I had hoped that this talk would provide some technical zen to help me get over my xdebug trepidation. Yet, this was a soft-skills talk. For the positives, this was a great talk to remind one to not panic when things go wrong. One should remove oneself from the situation, emotionally, and try to figure out what is actually going on. I enjoyed the real-life example and tried to logic my way through the introduced problem as Ben talked about various strategies. My debugging Zen only succeeded when he showed a funny-looking database record near the end of the talk. I hope that I am better equipped to approach the various problems I will experience on-the-job with as much zen acumen as Ben reminded us to provide in this talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
After party presented by Softlayer
It is after-parties like this that make conferences like Lone Star worthwhile. The speakers are great, the lunches are a definite bonus, but the people I meet and the conversations I have at the after-party are what make me want to return. Thank you, Softlayer, for making this possible!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
After party presented by Sparefoot
Thank you, Sparefoot, for sponsoring this after-party. I really appreciate the relaxed atmosphere you provided to meet interesting people and join in some great discussions. Omni's beers were definitely a bonus!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Turning Your Code Into a Company: The Parts They Don't Tell You
So much wisdom condensed into 50 minutes! Luke's talk provided a few funny moments (ex. if profit is negative in the equation 'profit = income - expense' then you have a hobby) as well as much food for though. This was a great end to the 2 or 3 days we have invested at Lone Star.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Teaching Kids to Fail
I come from a K-12 education background. For 15 years before leaving that industry, I toiled in the IT trenches of an under-funded school district while trying to provide our students with the best technology that we could both provide and afford. The problems that Maurya described and provided a solution to are more universal than what is found in the boroughs of New York. Great job on describing the issues lower-income students face. Yes, failure is not as simple a fix as a respawn and try again! I look forward to seeing a local branch of ScriptEd in my school district! Keep up the great work, Maurya! To those who wonder what they can do locally to help kids who want to learn programming and kids who need to learn how to successfully fail, I recommend taking a look at CoderDojo (https://coderdojo.com/) and volunteering at a local CoderDojo or starting your own. Perhaps after working within CoderDojo, we can figure out how to bring the joys of programming to our underprivileged students in our local schools, too.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
It Feels Great to Iterate
There once was a dev from Seattle Whose array was so long he would prattle. He said with a grin, As he iterated again, "Is my array traversable? I must tattle!" Normally, iterators are a yawn and a half. Jeremy does a great job of reminding one that iterators are simple yet powerful tools to keeping our code's performance healthy. That he can come up with a lengthy poem that is entertaining and clean is a bonus to attending his talk. Well done!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Object-Oriented JavaScript (yes, it really exists)
I have only been dealing with OO Javascript (ExtJS) for the past year without understanding how it was OOP nor why we did things the way we did. I just followed the example provided by my team while I was trying to figure out the whys and the wherefores. This talk helped me understand more about what I was doing in JavaScript than the various books I've read in the attempt to do so.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Talmudic Maxims to Maximize Your Growth as a Developer
This is a talk I have been looking forward to ever since I first heard of it months ago. R. Willroth does not disappoint. By far, this is my favorite talk of the conference. Yitzchok provides an intellectual conversation on how we, as developers, can improve ourselves and our community in small, yet profound ways. I took copious, yet not enough, notes on the various things said in this talk. Among the most pertinent topics were those on community, since community is what keeps me in PHP. I look forward to seeing this talk again!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Dependency Injection, Dependency Inversion, and You
This is a talk whose notes I took and slides were shared I shall review again. Already, I was able to take concepts learned in this talk and apply them knowingly to work. Thank you, Jeff!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Caching Strategies
Learned of more caching strategies than I can shake a memcached at. Since we're currently dealing with this at work, I was able to take away some strategies that I can attempt on-the-job. The pace was perfect and Ben's delivery is friendly, approachable, and makes me think, "Me too!" Well done.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Apr.2015)
Architecting with Queues for Scale, Speed, and Separation
Knowing very little of queues, I was expecting a more generic talk based on the topic title. However, I was disappointed to learn we were being taught from the POV of MS Azure. Yet, Sandy taught his experience with Azure as if it were from a different queueing platform. Had I realized sooner that Azure was the example, yet generic queueing was the topic, I would have gotten more out of this topic sooner. Once I realized, though... well done!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Apr.2015)
Refactoring Legacy Code
Adam is a knowledgeable, down-to-earth speaker. I appreciated the step-by-step portions of this talk as well as his recommended use of am autoloader. Every recommendation was practical and immediately usable, even in modern code.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Aug.2015)
Introduction to Homestead VM
Dan did a great job of introducing Homestead as an optional vagrant box and showing how easy it is to add to a project via Composer. He was able to convey both excitement about the project and trepidation about the current state of 0-60 PHP environment providers. These tools keep improving and the barrier to entry keeps getting shorter.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Aug.2015)
Hack Night
Great discussions!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(03.Sep.2015)
Demystifying OAuth2: an understandable way to approach connecting to other systems
This was a great introduction to OAuth2. Joseph's talk was reasoned and applied to a varied audience. Even if one is not a PHP dev, one could have gleaned some good information out of this talk. The slides were very good and the illustrations were professional-grade. This was a good talk for a hack night. Doing anything that requires setting up a local web server ([LAMP variants, vagrant, etc) takes time away from the talk, so it was nice that we had the additional time available.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Nov.2015)
Talmudic Maxims to Maximize Your Growth as a Software Developer
This is the third time I've seen this talk (second time today :) ), yet I come away with something new each time. You don't have to be a developer to enjoy this talk (apologies to the old Levy's rye bread adverts).
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Jan.2016)
What's New in PHP7
Great talk! The topic was very timely and drew a lot of interest to the PHP User Group meeting. I appreciated that modesty in which Joseph felt comfortable in stating "I don't know" to certain audience questions and "let's find out" to others as he would open up an http://3v4l.org session to try to find an answer. Overall, the talk was very engaging. Presentation style: This was one of Joseph's less confident talks I've seen. At the end of each topic, Joseph would let out a breath of air as if that slide was a huge struggle. Practice on giving the presentation will make it better! On the other hand, the personalized slide theme and selected images were spot on -- I hope to someday approach the design style Joseph so effortlessly radiates. Weakest link: A lot of time was spent on discussing a topic that Joseph kept reiterating on was an edge case. If it's an edge case and we're talking about what's new and awesome about PHP7, briefly mention it and move on. If the talk is about edge cases or esoterica of PHP7, then focus on that; in this case, however, it should have been briefly mentioned, if at all.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Rethinking Loops
This talk inspires one to be a more expressive programmer. John's gentle enthusiasm and careful planning take this talk from common boilerplate functions through a more expressive functional programming goal. I was impressed by many parts of this talk: * A video example of refactoring-to-expressive rather than live-coding * The bon mots he sprinkles throughout * The many examples of how one can improve one's understanding of code * The joy John exudes when speaking about this subject I am humbled that John chose to use my Haystack library as a featured party for his talk. I look forward to seeing this talk again at Lone Star PHP in April.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Apr.2016)
Docker For Developers
A nice intro to Docker with some good caveats. I had no idea about Rancher.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(16.Apr.2016)
Step Into Debugging
Excellent use of humor and humility. My main application does some things on the back-end that never see the light of http. I really appreciated this refresher of step-debugging and that debugging from a browser session AND the CLI were highlighted. I was able to use this almost a week later at work while trying to figure out why my changes to the API were throwing nasty errors while loading fixtures. Without step-debugging, this would largely be a guess and check with `var_dump`. With step-debugging from the CLI, I was able to quickly discern the actual problem and provide a hotfix. Woo! And to add to @GeeH's bank account: "PhpStorm is AWESOME!"
Rating: 4 of 5 
(16.Apr.2016)
Relational Theory for Budding Einsteins
I had no idea what to expect from this talk; although, I have seen Dave talk before at the Kansas Linux Fest and thoroughly enjoyed his DB talk there. Excellent use of humor and insider info to give us some skinny on good relational design.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Apr.2016)
HTTP is Dead. Long Live HTTP/2!
A nice shallow dive into HTTP. I appreciated all of the RFC mentions; I will be looking into some of these later! This is a style of talk I enjoy: the speaker was matter-of-fact, but also humble; the slides contained just the right amount of information to not distract from what the speaker was saying; it's shallow enough to let the audience know that there's so much more if only we'd look.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Apr.2016)
Terrible Ideas in Git
An entertaining talk. I can picture this as a end-of-day talk to let loose after much brain cram. With that said, Corey needs to be put on a leash and let nowhere near my bash profile. I've shared some of these terrible ideas, including the https://github.com/nvbn/thefuck library, with my coworkers.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Apr.2016)
The Formula to Creating Awesome Docs
Documentation is hard. Jonathan Reinink reminds us that it's also necessary. I will be using some of what I learned in my own projects, so thank you! The speaker's enthusiasm for this topic certainly helps make this a more interesting talk to attend. Well done!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.May.2016)
Writing Better Code with the New PHP 7
Good rundown on the biggest changes in PHP7. Some of the slide illustrations are brilliant! Speaking style and this talk have greatly improved since it was first given a few months ago! Some things to consider: * Before the talk, ensure that the 3v4l.org links are still active. I don't know if they have a TTL, but I would hope that at least hitting the link would extend its TTL. :) * An RFC was mentioned during the talk that allowed for multiple return types or mixed parameter types. I could not find that RFC. Be sure that you know if this RFC exists or not. * A polyfill was mentioned to allow for `mysql_*` functions in PHP7. What is this polyfill? * Examples at the bottom of the screen should be moved higher so that those sitting behind others in the audience can see the example. Again, great job! I know you'll do well at php[tek].
Rating: 4 of 5 
(02.Jun.2016)
Generators - not just for keeping the lights on
I really enjoyed this talk. You have a very easy going speaking style that put me at ease with this new-to-me subject right away. I would have loved to have spent more time on the code examples so that I could better understand the differences between them. The slides could use a little more polish and the transitions between slide, code example, and running the example could be smoother. Impressive, nonetheless! Seeing the memory vs speed differences between traditional loops and generators was pretty impressive. I wish that I had seen this talk before working on my last project! I hope that you shop this talk around. This needs to be seen.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(08.Sep.2016)
Using CloudFormation Templates for AWS
Explaining a complex JSON file is a tough job, and Joseph did a great job at explaining its parts and answering questions from the audience about it. This talk engendered much discussion during and after.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.Oct.2016)
A Deepdive Into The .git Directory
The topic was dry, yet the delivery was thorough and well presented. I watched with my team and this elicited several gasps of "woah" as we learned new things about the VCS we loathe to love. Joshua gave us a tiny peek behind the .git/object/ curtain and provided enough knowledge to enable us to pull the curtain back a little farther ourselves.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(08.Dec.2016)
Advent of Code 2016
John did a great job of facilitating this workshop in a conversational manner. He solicited suggestions from the audience while ensuring a TDD frame of reference.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Feb.2017)
A Common Taxonomy of Bugs and How to Squash Them
I really liked the extension of the metaphor into the lab notebook. This made taking the different kinds of bugs and how to resolve them easier to grasp and digest. Well done!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Feb.2017)
Taming the Resource Tiger
This was a great reminder of things that I have forgotten. Presentation flow was good. I've hit some of the same errors and growing pains, so I appreciated the humor in which Liz dealt with these. I'm always amazed at the deep core PHP knowledge that she gives away freely. Well done!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Feb.2017)
HTTP/2 and Asynchronous APIs
The visual demo was a great way to show how H2 would benefit me and my employer. I liked the highlighting of differences between H1 and H2-ready code. Well done!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(04.Feb.2017)
Console Applications: Automate your life away
It was great to see some fun uses of Symfony console. Your enthusiasm for the subject was expressed in your talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Feb.2017)
Dockerize your unit tests for faster feedback
I and several others had the same reaction: Holy ----! Excellent work. Great job setting up the problem and how you worked towards the solution. I can't wait to bring this idea back to my team.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Apr.2017)
/Regex Makes Me (Weep|Give Up|(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻).?/i
My regex-fu is very weak. However, after seeing this talk, I feel much better equipped to read and write it. Excellent combination of teaching and humor.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Apr.2017)
Lunch, sponsored by Twilio
BBQ, BBQ, a nice demo of Twilio, & BBQ.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Apr.2017)
Job Queues with Gearman
This was a great intro to queues. I appreciated that you looked at some of the common pitfalls when using queues.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Apr.2017)
Effective Code Review: What to Say & How To Say It
This was a well thought-out and executed talk. My only complaint with the talk is with the size of the the text in the sample code; but I know that you will fix this because you recognized the problem right away. This is what made the talk go from being good to being great: you immediately recognized a problem in your slides and did not let that affect your presentation style nor your attitude. The show went on.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(26.Apr.2017)
Real-time Dashboards With Async PHP
Great intro to reactive programming. I struggled getting my environment set up and in getting to "step 2," and I couldn't find those instructions, which I know are easily remedied. I know that this workshop can only improve. Well done!

Events They'll Be At

No events so far

Events They Were At

Lone Star PHP 2017 Apr 20, 2017
SunshinePHP 2017 Feb 02, 2017
Lone Star PHP 2016 Apr 07, 2016
Nomad PHP - June 2014 Jun 19, 2014
Lone Star PHP 2014 Apr 25, 2014
Nomad PHP September Sep 26, 2013
Nomad PHP August 2013 Aug 22, 2013
Nomad PHP July 2013 Jul 25, 2013
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