Eryn O'Neil

@eryno

Talks

Date Presented | Last Commented | By Comment | By Name

Comments

(Show Details)
(Hide Details)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.May.2013)
Detecting and Defending Fraud in eCommerce: A True Story
This talk was entertaining, informative, and full of actionable ideas. As someone who deals with a lot of digital fraud, I found the content to be interesting and exactly as advertised. I appreciated that the talk had structure (a few rules, two stories). Brent said this was his first time giving a talk, but I wouldn't have guessed it from his speaking style-- very clear, confident, and comfortable.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(23.May.2013)
Beyond the Basics: Security with PHP
Have to agree with the other reviewers. I thought the talk was really great-- good slides, good delivery-- I just wanted to get in even deeper.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.May.2013)
Mentoring Developers
The content in this talk was really helpful-- I especially loved the breakdown of how to mentor beginning, intermediate, and advanced developers. I am in a position where I'm doing a whole lot of the latter, but didn't know how to think of it except as the former. Also, it was very well scheduled, as it got me all pumped up for the mentorship summit!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Aug.2013)
Don't Be STUPID, Grasp SOLID
Great talk, great speaker. I found this talk very practical: realistic, not idealistic about OOP best practices. I'll definitely be reviewing the slides again later.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(18.Aug.2013)
Scaling PHP to 40 Million Uniques
Talks like this, that overview a lot of content, can be hard to keep interesting, but Johnathan managed it. Just enough depth. I really liked that he shared the specific tactics that Etsy took, often with metrics.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.Aug.2013)
Workshop: Up and Running with Twitter Bootstrap
Not being much of a front-end developer/designer, I found this workshop really helpful. I'm looking forward to bringing a little more beauty (and sanity) to my projects. Jen is a great teacher, and her experience shows. I also think the way the files were setup was really excellent.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(18.Aug.2013)
Developing For the Cloud, In The Cloud
I was disappointed because from the description I thought this talk would have more information about how to develop cloud-based apps, but it had basically nothing on that. Instead it was only an overview of cloud-based tools. David was able to prove his point that apps can be entirely delivered in the cloud by using only cloud-based apps to give his talk, but after not too long the gimmick wore off and it slowed the talk down to wait for commands to be typed, sites to be loaded, and tests to be run.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.Aug.2013)
Git Essentials
As a svn elder but a git newb, I enjoyed the first half of this talk. Once we hit merging and rebasing, I got lost, but that's alright. Everyone else in the audience seemed to be digging it, and you can't learn everything in one day. I was nervous when Matthew said much of the talk was going to be on the command line, but it actually worked out great. He was really well prepared and everything flowed well. Looking forward to watching the video once I get a little more experience under my belt.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(18.Aug.2013)
Building a REST API
I enjoyed the first half-or-so of this talk. The comparison between SOAP - RPC - REST helped with context. This talk was more grounded in specifics than other REST talks I've seen, which I really appreciated. However, I think it would have been stronger without the Zend content. I would have preferred more about how to design an API in a platform agnostic manner. It was a lot of dense code to look at when I don't use or intend to use Zend.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Mar.2014)
A startup story: Sending a billion text messages
Very interesting story, and very well delivered. The kind of thing that makes you think, "He's so young, and he's done so much, I have no chance" as well as "I could do that!!!" Ended a little early. But that's usually better than the alternative, at least. Would have been happy to listen to more!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(15.Mar.2014)
How I Learned to Stop Caring and Made Better Software
Good speaker with a lot of good experience. Nice to hear the evidence of why to do or not do things. Also, I have to agree-- process needs to evolve to fit the project! Would have liked more concrete takeaways interspersed in the anecdotes. Maybe via more fleshed-out slides. I am a huge fan of sparse slides, but most of the talk was done in front of company logos. A short headline relating to the talk at that point would have been welcome. And Eli, your voice wasn't really that bad, but feel better!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Apr.2014)
It's Vulnerable... Now What? Three Diverse Tales of Woe and Remediation
This talk was incredibly fascinating. To be honest, it was nearly an accident that I attended-- I didn't think the description sounded that useful for me-- but I'm very glad that I did. Mark clearly knows his stuff, and I appreciated his relaxed and engaging way of presenting it. After mostly seeing "Top 10 OWASP Vulnerabilities"-type presentations, it was really nice to see a presentation that was less remedial. The stories were really interesting, and opened my eyes to a few types of vulnerabilities I wasn't previously familiar with. I also feel a lot more confident about reporting security fixes in the future, and what my rights are in that circumstance. Honestly, if I have any feedback, it's to revisit the description for the talk. Yes, you certainly talked about how to report, but you also gave convincing arguments for why *I* should think of myself as someone who can find security vulnerabilities, and gave me a lot of food for thought in my own coding.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Jul.2014)
12 Reasons Your API Sucks
Good content and a very well-organized talk. Definitely one of my favorite Nomad talks yet. Really really appreciated the many well-chosen real-world examples-- seeing things in practice is the missing link in most API talks.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(30.Oct.2014)
Raiding the MongoDB Toolbox
I am barely a MongoDB noob, so I couldn't follow everything. That's okay, the talk wasn't aimed at me. However, I did get really jazzed about the more advanced features in MongoDB. Now I really want to go try it on a project. It was nice to hear something about Mongo that wasn't just the basics, and Jeremy made a pretty compelling case to check it out.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Feb.2016)
Applying the 4 Rules of Simple Design
This was, without a doubt, one of the best technical talks I have ever seen. Adam live-coded nearly the entire time. I know, normally that sentence would strike fear into my heart-- but Adam has clearly prepared so thoroughly, there was never a moment that came even close to the kind of horror stories you hear from live-coding talks. And yet, the code felt very natural and not contrived at all. As a result, it was a very useful and interesting look into how an experienced programmer approaches writing a real solution, from scratch. We've all heard the principles of good design and seen an example or two, but it doesn't compare to what you can learn from 45 minutes of watching a good dev make decisions.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Feb.2016)
Extreme Team Building: Surviving an Ocean Crossing
ermagerrrrrd. Stephanie is a great speaker, and this was a great talk. A good balance of story-telling (I know so much more about sailing now!) and info delivery for a keynote talk. Her stories were well-chosen to illustrate her points. My only critique is that each section ended with a bulleted list of qualities that are/aren't present when that element of teamwork is going well, and I felt a bit read to on those slides. I'm not sure if the content ought to be more integrated, or if some just needs to be cut. But it's not even enough to drop one star, just room for improvement on an already great talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Feb.2016)
/Regex makes me want to (weep|give up|(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻)\.?/i
Somehow Brett talked for almost an hour about regex's, and not only was it entertaining, I understood it. One of the clearest breakdowns of regular expressions I've encountered in all my time as a developer. Actually kind of looking forward to getting my hands on the slides later so I can use it as a reference. It's a weird feeling to be looking forward to reading something about regular expressions, but hey, weirder things have happened. Probably.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
Everything You Need To Know to Be Comfortable With WordPress
I really enjoyed this talk. I'm an experienced dev who's managed Wordpress sites through its front-end, and installed it, but never built a plugin or theme. I feel like I was 100% the target audience for this talk. David did a good job breaking the tech down into understandable but not overly-simplistic pieces. He made good choices about what to go into with more depth and what to hand wave. Tech needs more people who can understand the nerd, but explain it in human. Given the controversy around WordPress's code choices, I also appreciated David's neutral delivery. The talk wasn't overly negative, or rose-colored, or apologetic. David is aware of the things within WP that don't square with modern dev practices, but also assumed that we were there to learn about WP and gave us the facts.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(08.Apr.2016)
Adventures of a Contract Developer
As someone who just started contracting a few months ago, I really appreciated this talk. Some things I could see myself in, some things I haven't encountered yet but appreciated the warning, and lots was just good food for thought. Very well-prepared and well-delivered; Tim is a good speaker (and the "slides" looked great!).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(08.Apr.2016)
Stop Multiplying by 4: Practical Software Estimation
It's always fun to see a talk multiple times because you can see how it's evolved. I saw this one of the first times Chuck gave it, in a short unconference format, and it's really leveled-up as a talk. I have a lot of professional experience writing requirements and providing estimates, but I still walked away with a few new tricks. I liked that Chuck talked about different parts of the process and different levels of complexity. For example, the Urgency-Importance matrix vs. the much more complicated formula. Estimation could be a pretty dry topic, but Chuck kept it interesting and practical. My only suggestion would be to include the name of the books and their authors on the slides at the end, in addition to the covers and the ISBNs. It's a better experience if I don't have to download the slides later to find out the authors.

Events They'll Be At

No events so far

Events They Were At

php[world] 2016 Nov 14, 2016
ScotlandPHP 2016 Oct 28, 2016
Lone Star PHP 2016 Apr 07, 2016
Midwest PHP 2016 Mar 04, 2016
SunshinePHP 2016 Feb 04, 2016
Midwest PHP 2015 Mar 14, 2015
SunshinePHP 2015 Feb 05, 2015
ZendCon 2014 Oct 27, 2014
php[tek] 2014 May 19, 2014
Lone Star PHP 2014 Apr 25, 2014
MidwestPHP 2014 Mar 14, 2014
Nomad PHP January Jan 23, 2014
Northeast PHP 2013 Aug 16, 2013
php[tek] 2013 May 14, 2013
Midwest PHP 2017 Mar 18, 2017
© Joind.in 2017