Ramon de la Fuente

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Rating: 3 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
A Web Of Identity
Ade Oshineye is an calm and fascinating speaker who can play with the audience and that's a good skill. Yet I feel that his talk did not quite "come to the point". So it sparked no conversation (for me) afterwards, and that's a shame for a keynote.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Unbreakable Domain Models
As a first talk it really slammed home that there's so much stuff going on beyond what I'm "used to". The talk was clear, had examples that where direct and to the point. Nothing extra was needed, nothing could be taken out without losing value. I wish my code looked more like that :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Introduction to Lisp
Igor entertained the audience while explaining a warped concept like Lisp in a very relaxed manner. The images where *super* simple and yet I left with the notion of the possibilities.. like a spark of something shiny and valuable in the distance.. something I've never seen before when looking at functional languages.. PS: It turns out: defmacro is indeed a macro
Rating: 3 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
PHP, Under The Hood
While I like Anthony Ferrara as a speaker (a lot), I thought this talk was too short - and I would have enjoyed to get a bit more information from the lessions he had learned in his journey building PHPPHP. Maybe he did that with regards to the engine and the way php runs, but not really regarding basic concepts in the language itsself. I'm sure he *must* have encountered at least a few WTF moments...
Rating: 3 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Dependency Injection Smells
While I admire the guts it takes to point the finger to some code and say "this should never be done" while almost certainly having authors or contributors in the audience, I do feel that the talk was mislabeled. We where expecting more smells with actual current DI practices.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
The Proxy pattern in PHP
Absolute and rock-solid talk about the proxy pattern, from someone who's *obviously* pushing it to new levels.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Getting your toolbox together
The speaker was talking a bit fast, bit otherwise I also wasn't impressed with the talk. While we're not using Vagrant and Chef/Puppet/Salt, there wasn't much new on *what* it does - and a lot (especially on the slides) on how to configure stuff. I'm pretty sure I already forgot most of that info by the time we got downstairs. Also, the talk was specifically about Vagrant/Chef and that should be reflected in the title. We expected at least a couple of tools in the "toolbox".
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Growth Hacking for Humans
Funny all the way, and his journey is *so* recognizable I had my hand up more time than not. Awesomely inspiring. In fact, I could not resist acting on the spot.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Nginx: The power within
Very good speaker; good looking slides with the right amount of code; and while we've been using Nginx for a few years - this was very informative on it's possibilities.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Emergent Design with phpspec
Absolutely the most pleasant surprise of the whole convention. Marcello is *hilarious* while still driving home his message, and the message itsself is also very interesting. Being coached ahead instead of pushed back by your testing framework is very very interesting. Loved it!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Measuring and Logging Everything in Real Time
Good speaker. Learned nothing new exactly but I was pushed to implement more of the tools, and the tools where explained sufficiently.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Worse Is Better, for Better or for Worse
I've seen Kevlin Henney a few years ago and his talk was as left-field then as it was today. Concepts from different era's and disciplines are combined and used to force new insight. I firmly believe that everytime someone has the chance to see Kevlin talk on any subject but decides not to go, God kills a kitten.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.Jun.2013)
Traits and statics, the right way
I found Frank to be an interesting speaker, who made a difficult topic reasonably accessible. And, he's got jokes - which keeps the flow going when unplanned stuff happens. I'd surely check out another talk by him. As a pointer, I'd say that -ignoring the typo's- the material in the slides left the most room for improvement. The example with traits as limbs was just too 'far out' - simple is good, but a practical example always makes more sense to me.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(03.Sep.2013)
Practical Refactoring
I enjoyed the talk, Stefan is a very calm speaker and easy to listen to. As far as content goes, I would have liked a little more in-depth. I agree with the comment "it's more an introduction to refactoring", I expected more from the title of the talk as well. But I obviously don't agree with the 1-thumb rating, it's still a good talk to get aquainted with refactoring. Best touched subjects where selling refactoring to your customers (or perhaps to yourself), and when *not* to refactor. Thanks Stefan!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Sep.2013)
Hypermedia ALL THE THINGS! A company’s move from POX to HATEOAS
I had never heard Luke Stokes speak before (but then that's the point of Nomad I think, getting US speakers to EU audience and vice-versa). It seems to me that the video-conference format makes the setting a lot more difficult for the speaker without a direct feedback loop with the audience. I felt he talked a little fast during the presentation, but I feel he would have delivered it a lot better in person. He obviously knows the subject matter well. As for the content - I really enjoyed it and there was a *a lot* of food for the mind. The slides didn't really match up though, a few more examples and a little less summary of what was being said maybe...
Rating: 4 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Vagrant & Puppet workshop
This workshop was done without slides, so you know Joshua knows more than a bit about the subject. I'm pretty sure every participant walked away with a reasonably accurate idea on what can be achieved with Vagrant and Puppet. Possible improvement: maybe the personal experimentation could be taken a bit further - but that would also mean a bit more time.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
A hands-on introduction to writing unittests using PHPUnit
Om te beginnen was dit een prima workshop, met heldere principes achter de voorbeelden. Het is al gezegd, maar het niveau had van mij ook wel iets hoger mogen liggen, vandaar geen vier sterren. Een gedeelte van de tijd besteden aan het schrijven van unit-tests aan eigen code zou fijn zijn (of iemand in de groep die bereid is zijn/haar code inzichtelijk te maken voor de rest naar voren halen en zijn/haar code van wat testen voorzien). Ik vond het overtypen van de voorbeelden een zeer goed idee om vertrouwd te raken met het schrijven van testen, maar dat moet niet al te lang duren. Na vier of vijf testen schrijven kost dat teveel tijd en is het concept wel duidelijk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Opening
The video was excellent! Amazing to see an edited video of the day before - extra browny points to the video guys. But I do feel conflicted about the dutch intro.. mostly dutch visitors, an unknown number of which may not speak english - a handful of visitors who don't speak dutch. But then there's the speakers... Perhaps a dual language intro/outro would do better?
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Debugging HTTP
I'm not new to the subjects and tools explained in the talk (except charles, which has been added to the arsenal instantly). But I was very much impressed with Lorna's ability to explain the material. You get a sense of simplicity that I never experienced while learning how to debug this stuff on my own.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
"Orcs 'n' All": A Journey to Mount Doom (via Facebook)
I think Gary Hockin is a fun and entertaining speaker to listen to, but the subject material wasn't for me I guess.. I've seen too much "people are suckers" type of doing business for my taste.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
PHPHooligans
I love the format, I love the interaction. IMO, this should not be a "talk", but a recurring track on other conferences as well... What could have been done better was the intro; where it's made clear that the points on screen are to be attacked by the audience and defended by the speakers. As an alternative format (if the group is not too large), you could draw a line through the room, select a subject, and let the aucience take seats according to their opinion. It creates the opportunity for opening questions like "why are you sitting on that side". It should also be possible to switch sides during the discussion if you're convinced by the other side. -- during the fight a point was made that we clarified some of the "issues" and it should be documented. If this hooliganism should catch on, and be repeated, the updated points could evolve and be discussed further by a totally different group... My thoughts are flying on this.. as you can see: highly inspirational!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
PHPCR: A better way to structure your content
Willem-Jan picked a too short slot to explain PHPCR in any detail at all.. so this rating is a three. BUT: I think there's absolutely space for those last two thumbs up with a longer talk and a little more rehearsal. Keep it up!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Productivity and the Pomodoro Technique
Good subject, explained well. I never realised this was your first talk.. was it really? You have a calm and relaxed way of speaking , with good humor. Your slides where also excellent!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Wat doet Netwerven?
I think it was brave to come out and do a sponsored (unconf) talk. You came right out and said it too, which made it ok in my book. As for content, I think you missed the target audience a bit... if the work sucks, having huge well-known clients does nothing to make a developers heart beat faster. So go more in-depth on the techniques next time. Not everyone is using wordpress with composer and sass! *one point for Willem-Jan (I think) who called you out on using "beautiful" and "SOAP" in a single sentence.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
'ProTalking' your way into Open Source
I felt every emotion you discribed contributing to OS , I'd say you hit that part out of the park! The interactive open-source talk was an excellent idea for this talk. The slides where really nice and well prepared. To improve the talk, I'd say skip the Vagrant/setup bit. I think most developers are capable of getting a project going and if not, a small segment on Vagrant isn't going to help them *that* much. As for the nerves, they where certainly noticable but I hope you get to do this many many more times in the future!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Parenting vs. Programming
This was a well executed talk, I think this subject needs more and more attention. Programming (in PHP) hasn't been around that long - but certainly long enough to have a large group of people who got into and are now parents currently combining "programming and parenting". Not only the mothers :-)
Rating: 3 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Advanced debugging with PHPStorm and Zend Server
Jeroen got bit by "live demo" and a slot that allowed no room for expansion whatsoever, right before the closing keynote. Content-wise I think the main point was that there was a change in how to *set up* debugging with PHPStorm and Zend Server, while I think that should have been just a side-note. The title was, after all, "Advanced debugging with PHPStorm and Zend Server"...
Rating: 3 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Keynote
Jesse does a good talk (maybe a bit too fast), but to me it did not feel like the "crown" on a good congress day. It's always interesting to get a look in someone else's kitchen, but it was a bit too high-level and it did not inspire me.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Drinks
Beer. 'Nuff said. -- to people who don't stay after a conference, please do - it's great.. talk to at least 3 complete strangers!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Sep.2013)
Game night
Please accept my humble apologies for any raucous laughter I generated at the game night... In my defense: it was my first encounter with Cards Agains Humanity! Doing an offline game-night after a conference was nothing short of brilliant by the way.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(21.Mar.2014)
Having async fun with reactphp
I'm not adding anything new here, but I think diagrams instead of code examples would certainly work wonders. The terms (async, websockets) as well as libraries (react, ratchet) are unknown to most. Paint a picture of your non-blocking way of doing things by show a blocking example side-by-side. Also, you gave an example after the talk in which you desribed reading from and writing to multiple (huge) files at the samen time. This is something people can relate to, a problem you can 'fix' for them with an async solution. Finally - someone in the audience asked you to demo your project. I think your projects should in *in* the talk, so you can show the different moving parts in action. Not just from a search-and-result point of view, but starting with the request, follow that request to the db and back. It's two thumbs up now, but you will certainly improve by doing this talk more often. Keep it up! PS: small note - you paused quite often to take a drink. That took the flow out of the talk once or twice.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(14.Jun.2014)
Build that Phing!
My rating of 3 thumbs up has to do with the content more than Ricks speaking ability, so I'll try to separate those in my comment: The Phing project is not for me. I understand what does and where it came from, but there are better tools out there to run tasks. The fact that it's written in PHP could be found a pro as well as a con, and I really don't like programming in XML (more advanced topic). I would not want to see other talks about Phing. 2 thumbs up. Rick has a reasonably relaxed stance, and is able to deliver the step by step build-up of explaining the Phing project. Sometimes, I found his speech a little too hasty - but he did his talk in dutch and het admitted later that his english is better. I would like to see more talks by Rick, on other subjects. 4 thumbs up.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
KEYNOTE: A startup story: Sending a billion text messages
Evan is obviously comfortable on stage, and he knows how to deliver a punchline. The advice (nurishing your side projects) is simple and with his success story easy to understand. I do feel, however, that the massive success at a very young age kind of undermines the message as well, because everything you do at that age is a 'side project'. I got a certain 'but that's not me' feeling that took away a little bit of the inspiration that belongs in a keynote...
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
HHVM
I enjoyed this talk a lot - especially since it included hacklang. Alexander makes very nice and clear slides + short live demo's, and delivers the message well. I like the pre/post messages stating what he's hoping to accomplish with the talk, it gives clarity on what to expect. If I *had* to provide a tip for improving the talk: maybe, just maybe, a little more humor.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
Abstract Machines
Although I have read "Understanding Computation" and saw some material on this subject, because of Igor's own particular style and humor, I still very much enjoyed this talk. Highly recommended! But I still didn't give a max rating, because I think the explanation of the halting problem needs just a few more steps to explain it more clearly. Especially since this is near the end of the presentation, it should leave less people in the audience with a feeling of lack of understanding.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
Uncon - Managed Technical Debt
It's insane how much gold Mathias can deliver in a 15 minute lightning talk. His passion combined with the subject matter of his talk(s) makes for 5 thumbs up *every friggin' time*.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
Websockets and Event-driven Programming with PHP
This subject deserves more fire, there's so much that can be done besides the text-book example of a chat server. Also, I think Steve wasn't really into the talk which made for a tiresome and hard to follow delivery (disclaimer: I sat on the floor so that was tiresome by itsself). Finally, I would have liked the parts of the code that demanded attention at a certain time to be highlighted. I'ts really hard to read back to back slides of code and understand what the speaker is saying. I did like the effects on the slides (zooming into a slide to get the next one), that gave a good flow.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
Easy PR checking 201
Great tool! From the title, I didn't expect the talk to include an actual product, especially one that rocks... I like your style, really laid back - perhaps a little too much at certain points, resulting in less-understandable mumbling (that would be the only improvement I can think of).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
Practical Event Sourcing
On the subject: Mind blown. Also: Mathias has an enery and capacity for transerring enthousiasm that makes him an excellent technical speaker. If you have the chance to see him speak, do *not* miss it.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
Refactoring with Design Patterns
I think this talk needs a split between live coding and some form of automated code examples. The live coding at the start is good, to get a real feel of the tiny steps needed to properly refactor (without tests). But once that point is driven home, a recording of "live coding" would suffice. That would guarantee that there are no typo's, no confusing backtracks and more importantly, more pace to reach the end of the material.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
Making the Most of your Agile Process
This talk was really on the money. We've been going through the same motions (implementing the process without really grasping the 'framework for making decisions' part), but I really agree with the conclusions. The slides where good, the delivery was good... Justin nailed it!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
Giving up Control: Inversion of Control for Beginners
Good introduction to IOC, using a real-world example. Also: good job of forcing the Dutch to raise their hands and answer questions ;-)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Jun.2014)
KEYNOTE: Getting artistic with code
This woke everyone up after an exhausting two (three?) days, with an amazingly funny talk. And while it's about programming, it's so far removed from my dayjob that it widens my perspective about what can be done with code. I'd say this is *exactly* what a closing keynote should be about. Oh yeah, and he stuck in some advice as well, bonus points!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Jul.2014)
The Big why Equal doesn't Equal Quiz
The rating does not need a lot of explaining. This quiz is challenging, enlightening but most of all: *fun* There are some WTF's included, but it's not just a series of exposures of PHP weirdness. There is real value in understanding the "why".
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Jul.2014)
The Template Is Not The View: A Brief Introduction to Action-Domain-Responder
I was quite preoccupied with my own talk to follow yours, but I still picked up most of what you where saying. Well explained.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(25.Jul.2014)
Ansible Project Deploy
The slides are available on slidethare - but as this is a longer talk originally, here's the link with the additional slides: http://www.slideshare.net/ramondelafuente/ansible-projectdeploy PS: thanks for the feedback.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Jul.2014)
Beyond Design Patterns
As always, Anthony cuts to the core of what we are trying to do day after day. He disects the current body of knowledge, rearranges it, and through that movement - like an artist - makes something new without changing the actual pieces. I'm not sure if this talk can be absorbed in a single session, but it most certainly inspires and invites to play around more with the concepts he introduces. 5 out of 5.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(30.Jul.2014)
Principles of PHP Package Design
Matthias takes you on a trip explaning the principles of package design, which is to a degree still uncharted territory in PHP land. The talk is quit abstract, which is reflected in the artwork used - I could not always infer the meaning of an image just by looking at it, although I feel it was designed to be clear. Also, being a practical guy, I could do with just a few more examples with existing packages... But putting aside those minor points of improvement, the material that Matthias brings is (as always) food for thought with huge implications. I'm very glad I finally got to see this talk :-)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.Aug.2014)
Team The Avengers
I was thoroughly impressed with the way this team went through every motion. From the project choice, to the progress made, to having the time to prepare for their presentation. From the confidence displayed to the force of having a shared vision. Also: the coach ;-) If this team could have done better, I didn't see it. Excellent job!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(31.Aug.2014)
Team PlusPlus
I really liked the idea this team had - I could see it work in production and I'm sure they where on the right track in releasing the simple tool they had and waiting for the community to start building wacky things with it. They seem to have built a pretty complete product with a pretty good presentation.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.Aug.2014)
Pragmatist Survival Game
This was a very interesting exercise, because we did not do it with the teams picked for the week. Suddenly, after two days, we where building stuff with - and competeing against - different people. There was additional value in that and it **should** be part of WeCamp in my opinion!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(31.Aug.2014)
Enrise BBQ
A BBQ is always nice, but I didn't feel it was a required part of the whole experience. I might be biased as I was stil busy coding and not so much into the BBQ mood...
Rating: 4 of 5 
(31.Aug.2014)
Game Night
Offline games are a good idea, but perhaps there should be some kind of preference poll beforehand so people don't carry around 11 kg pokersets for nothing ;-) Still a must-have though.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(31.Aug.2014)
Team Off-By-One
I think the team picked a very large target, and as such didn't have the wow-effect in their presentation. But I also got the feeling they went with unknown technology on purpose to learn from it - and so perhaps internally they got a lot more that we could see from the outside. I do hope they continue their project, a good meetup alternative would be n-i-c-e!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(08.Sep.2014)
Team Undefined Release Date
**I'm posting this a a team-member for this team so the rating is different from what I have the others. I'd put us at four stars if I look at it from the outside. I very mucht enjoyed being dropped in a team of four, with three nationalities between us. It took all of 30 minutes to become a team, choose a name and decide on a project - I've seen people take longer to decide what to have for lunch! You guys where great to work with :-) Our coach, Mike van Riel, did an excellent job of "nudging" us whenever we veered off course, and showing us some great best-practices with regards to set-up and execution of a project. I learned a lot. Plus I also very much enjoyed his in-depth insights when it came to code. So a special thanks to Mike.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(18.Oct.2014)
Refactoring using Codeception
Jeroen gave a really insightful talk on some of the less obvious ways of using codeception. I'd say this talk requires a bit of codeception knowlegde to grasp exactly *how* it's done, but I think even without you get a good idea on *what* is being done and how that could benefit you. I really love the talk title and the actual contents - but I would change the description a little bit, especially the opening sentence is a little bit denglish.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(24.Jan.2015)
Abstract Filesystems, with Flysystems
Good talk - I really got a good impression of the amount of work it would save to use the library. Also, a good speaker - pretty relaxed, but I do have one tiny tip: You frequently check your (back) pocket with your right hand during speaking. Don't know if you're aware of that :-)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Jan.2015)
Opening & Keynote; Talmudic Maxims to Maximize Your Growth as a Software Developer
Being the 34th person to comment on this, I've scanned the list as I was thinking about what to write. I allow myself to do that when I've already decided on a rating - and this was a no-brainer 5-thumbs-up** Never have I seen such a long list of exclusively 5-thumbs-up. Never before was it so deserved imo. This talk goes to the very core of being a human and bringing out the best in yourself, on a practical level. I always try to add a single tip or improvement to the talk ratings, even when I like them. But in this case, there is simply no need to change anything... ** in fact, I'm contemplating doing a pull-request on joind.in to add another thumbs up *just* for this keynote
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Jan.2015)
Small Uncontrolled Experiments
I'm such a huge fan of Mathias, I always think the next presentation *must* be the one where he slips, and doesn't manage to hit that high expectation. And yet, once again: 5 thumbs up. In content as well as presentation. If there is anything to improve this talk, I'd say that the technical debt bit should include a little bit more of the background (like the uncon talk at DPC14). But hey, that's just a teeny tiny bit of personal preference...
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Jan.2015)
Social Event
I had an absolute blast, and I especially liked how the social and the sponsor area kind of blended together for a choice of activities and a super ambiance.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(25.Jan.2015)
Microservices: Packs small, plays BIG!
Good overview talk of the Microservices concept, although I would have liked a bit more examples of how (and where in the architecture) the services are tied together. As a tip, Stephan (if you don't mind getting one from a noob), I'd say that you could cut down on the terms "and what-not", "whatever" and "or something". You really know your sh*t, but those words hide that fact a bit. [4-out-of-5. Filing a but report with joind.in that ratings dissapear when you edit a comment.]
Rating: 3 of 5 
(25.Jan.2015)
Creating your own Entity/Object Manager
I like the talk subject and content, but the execution was a little troublesome. There is quite a lot of code, and the slides don't fit so you needed to scroll *during* the presentation. Even you missed the next step at some points. Plus, you're taking people along on a build where they have to keep track of the changes in their mind... hard work for tired minds ;-) But: I feel if this presentation was a tutorial, you would have rocked it 100%!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Jan.2015)
Higher Order Programming
I'm a little familiar with the concepts of functional programing so following along wasn't hard, excellent pace for a live coding session. I also really enjoyed seeing what Mathias is up to with Lambdalicious, you should try it if you're exploring functional stuff in PHP. 4 stars. Because I wanted this to last LONGER. Damned magic show.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Jan.2015)
How Not Using PHP Can Make You Better At PHP
I liked the talk contents, but it all seemed a bit unconnected at times. The delivery was also somewhat off. I'm pretty sure I would have been highly impressed minus the hangover, so it's still a 4-thumbs up for me :-) One improvement could be to use some images for concepts, because "one of those childrens puzzles where the image is all jumbled up and one square is open" works so much better like this: http://www.bestqualitytoys.com/files/images/thinkfunlarge/5853.jpg
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Jan.2015)
Profiling PHP: A dive into your application
This talk is quite complete, nicely paced and useful information on how to get started with profiling. I hope the link0/profiler library gets connected to a good (XH?) gui so we can start using it. Well done!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(23.Jun.2015)
Getting started with ReactPHP
I always find this topic very interesting, and the approach in the talk is very step-by-step. I do feel that some of the concepts (like Promises) are quite abstract, and could use a little more explanation, but as a whole the presentation + demo show how elegant but powerful the end-result can be. A tip I'd like to give the speaker is to just duplicate slides if there is a reference to some code that has already passed. Moving back-and-forth through the deck can get confusing, and I feel that adding some slides twice will keep the presentation moving forward, even when you're looping back to a previous concept to show how things tie together.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Jul.2015)
Exploring CQRS and Event Sourcing
I've seen a handful of presentations on CQRS and Eventsourcing now, and I must say I like Paul's approach a lot. He "migrates" a design from a current implementation to what it could become if event-sourced. The step-by-step explanation and exploration of the benefits, but also the anticipated problems are a nice touch. As a solitary tip, I'd say that Paul might articulate just a tiny bit more.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Nov.2015)
Building Open Source Communities
Controversial and intriguing! I was as impressed with the delivery (no slides) as the content of this keynote. Pieter Hintjens absolutely makes you think, and points out that many things we do come from a mindset that is based on nothing but assumptions (of the ego). I do have to add that the points/rules delivered as absolutes in the talk where later nuanced in a personal conversation, but that does not detract anything from the talk.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(15.Nov.2015)
New Insights From Small Data
I enjoyed the start, but found myself expecting a more in-depth view right until the end of the talk. Some examples showing the difficulty in solving a certain problem with and witout a graph database might help here. (and I also noticed the total imbalance between use of the word "left" versus "right" ;-) )
Rating: 3 of 5 
(15.Nov.2015)
Parsers All The Way Down? Exploring Combinator Parsing
Most of what I wanted to say has been said, so a short summary: - Stefanie Schirmer is a very energetic speaker which I loved (although the audio tech chould have turned the volume a little lower) - Some of the content was read from the laptop, that was distracting - I could not follow all the steps, I could have done with some more in-between steps. 3 thumbs up, but certainly a candidate for more when the talk is more polished.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Nov.2015)
Quines Upon Quines
I've never passed on an opportunity to watch Igor rock the stage and I'm glad I did so again. One of those rare speakers that makes it look so easy to be on stage, an inspiration all the way. I enjoyed the history lesson, but if I had to choose I might have liked a liiiiiitle more time on the logic gate to full adder bit because that just made a wooshing sound as it went by... which probably resulted in an idiotic question at the end. Sorry about that ;-)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Nov.2015)
Abusing Phones to Make the Internet of Things
This talk woke me up, in more ways than one. First, the speker is super-energetic, not afraid to make a fool of himself - which makes him a pleasure to watch. Second, the "internet of things" isn't just some marketing blah used as an excuse to slap electronics in everything (like a kettle, so you know when the water boils. Really??). You can actually do some really insane but cool things, if you only try. And try we will!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(31.Jan.2016)
Down The Rabbit Hole​
This was absolutely an inspiring keynote. And as a son with similar pride of his dad that part was absolutely moving. A brave thing to do in front of an audience. (I would also have loved to hear more about Red Adaire though). I rate four because the impact on me personally was a little below CodeRabbi's keynote last year, and Eamon Leonard at DPC in 2013 - but maybe I should be able to mark some "exceptional" so I can hand out five stars :-)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.Jan.2016)
“Writing code that lasts” … or writing code you won’t hate tomorrow.
Rafael is just so easy to watch. His slides are always impeccable. I must say I like the in-depth version (Code Calisthenics) better, but not by much - and this talk does give a much wider range of area's to improve in.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(31.Jan.2016)
Five Weird Tricks to Become a Better Developer
A very good talk on how to be a better human in general, I enjoyed that it lot. If I where forced to give an area of improvement, I'd say there is room for "seven weird tricks" - to keep the pace just a little higher.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(31.Jan.2016)
Rewriting 12-Year-Old Code
A very insightful talk, delivered with ease and expertise. Gained some good insight when it comes to dealing with the old codebases flying around.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.Jan.2016)
The Lost Art of Defensive Programming
The one thing that developers keep forgetting is "time". The passage of time will erode even rocks, and codebases are a lot less SOLID (pun intended). Jeremy's talk adresses that nicely, and as usual there's always that one SUPER useful thing in his talk that you didn't know about before.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(31.Jan.2016)
How to Migrate Anything with DDD
Like the rest I was mislead by the title. Also, I didn't quite get the problem that was being solved - so my interest in Baleen wasn't peaked. When it comes to delivery, I found the presentation had too many slides with bullet points, and was a bit monotonous. Bonus points for having the guts to do a live demo though. That went reasonably smooth.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(31.Jan.2016)
Hexagonal architecture - message-oriented software design
I love the simplicity of Matthias's slides. I find the clarity with which he can explain complex subjects impressive, in his book as well as talks. And when it comes to content, this talk is no different. As for this instance of the talk: It might have something to do with the main stage and distance to the crowd, or it being the last talk of the day - but the crowd participation was less than optimal. A bit more energy might have been better in this case.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(31.Jan.2016)
Extracting wisdom from stupidity
Thanks for the positive feedback, all. I really had no idea what to expect. I added my slides, with "slight modifications" to preserve the quality of the talk. [chuckle]
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Feb.2016)
Sandwiches/Beer/Social/Fries
Hat tip to the organisation. Everything here was just so well executed.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Feb.2016)
Closing & Raffles (Beethoven Auditorium) + Post conference social
Jeopardy was the shit. A game at the end of a conference is an excellent idea, and the additional sponsor-love given by adding them in the game was a very smart move. I didn't find the whole thing boring at all, compared to other conferences. Handing out tickets just before the raffle clearly solved the problem of people winning who had already gone home (which is absolutely the most boring thing that can happen), so well done. Maybe next year we can point a camera at the audience and have some AI pick winners directly...
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.Feb.2016)
How to effectively grow a development team
This talk touches on many subjects quite briefly, and still manages to go in-depth enough so that you get inspired to think and do more with the content. I've seen a lot of the things he mentions work first hand at our company. As a speaker, Jeroen is easy to listen to and I get the feeling he could go on for hours without boring me. Certainly a refreshing subject, and absolutely _not_ only for managers. Rules and regulations can only be pushed top-down, but culture can start on any level! If I had to give a tip, it would be similar to what Matthias said. A little more chapter-based story, taking us along the timeline at Schiphol a bit more. Maybe touch on how things changed from 5 to 10 to 20 to 35?
Rating: 4 of 5 
(15.Apr.2016)
Understanding Internationalization & Localization
I found this talk very valuable since these problems tend to always turn up _after_ you did everything wrong. There is a lot of knowledge here, and the speaker obviously knows the subject through and through. I think that the talk covers so much that some of the information is too condensed. On the other hand some parts where just getting good, but due to lack of time could not be covered in full. Perhaps splitting this talk into an easier version and an advanced version could provide the room to do both. I'm sure Camilo could rock both versions equally well. All in all I would certainly say this is a valuable talk for a huge group of developers, including me.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.May.2016)
Marijn Huizendveld: Why we failed and succeeded to apply DDD within our startup
You would be hard-pressed to find anyone in the PHP community with as much experience in doing DDD as Marijn. Hearing from him about everything that he has been through is very liberating because it's not all candy and roses. It's a real world story. This was certainly a 5-star talk for me. The one tiny tip I have for Marijn is to project his voice a bit more; I was sitting in the back and there where (a few) moments where it was a bit hard to hear what was being said.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(26.Jun.2016)
Microservices with Thrift, or why I stopped worrying about REST
I found this talk has a good level of detail while still explaining the big picture. To improve the talk, I would have liked to see a working example maybe, instead of the mention/description of an alternative library that does the same thing.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(26.Jun.2016)
A Talk About Naming Things Talk
I like the way Shawn is always working on the more abstract ideas behind the job we do. I'm pretty sure I would enjoy any topic he decides to speak about. Additional points for removing the mic mid-talk when it was bothering him, that's a gutsy move. 4 stars because I'd like to see his thoughts a bit more structured.. but that just might be his style.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(26.Jun.2016)
Integrating Bounded Contexts
I enjoyed this talk, Carlos has a good stage presence and a nice way to guide listeners through a solution. Although I do agree that the title does not match the content, and that would be a point of improvement.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(26.Jun.2016)
Deploying PHP 7
I'd never seen Rasmus speak but he is very easy to listen to and just oozes experience and knowledge. Which is good, but at the same time lost a star because some parts of the presentation are just so specific for very high load setups that it felt too niche for a 5-star rating in my opinion.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.Jun.2016)
You're just my type
I enjoyed Sara's enthusiasm so much that the "I was just born" part (she had rewritten the presentation the night before) did not bother me at all. She is clearly a very skilled programmer who knows where the bodies are buried in PHP. Highly recommended.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.Jun.2016)
Event Sourcing: the good, the bad and the complicated
I enjoyed this talk a lot. The slides where hilarious and the talk reflect honest experience with building an event-sourced application.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(26.Jun.2016)
Feature Flags are Flawed: Let's Make Them Better
I think this talk is a reasonable overview of feature toggles, and a nice explanation of how the 'problem' was solved with the Swivel library. I'm not sure I agree with the entire solution (and to be honest, "users" in "buckets" that have "behaviours" sounds like an ACL with "users" in "groups" that have "privileges" so maybe the problem didn't require a new solution at all). As for the speaker, it was presented quite well but a little bit more humour would have made it better.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.Jun.2016)
How We Talk About Tech
Ross had this super-fast pace that sometimes didn't even stop for his own audience's responses; but other than that he was a brilliant keynote speaker. He aimed for the hart and in my case: he got there. Too bad I had to murder him.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(26.Jun.2016)
Mirror, mirror on the wall: Building a new PHP reflection library
I was a bit disappointed because I expected to learn a little bit more about what is possible with reflection (but that is mainly because I did not read the abstract, just the title on my card). I was also less interested in the problems left for the library to solve - I would have preferred some usage examples... Other than that, well delivered talk by a good speaker.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(27.Jun.2016)
Architectural Anti-patterns
This was a little too shallow for my taste, and the slides don't need so much text (some where just read out loud). I do thing there is a lot of potential there, with some polishing.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
A World Without PHP
I found this talk a little disappointing as a keynote to be honest. Not for the content, because I feel the topic and approach where very promising (although I would have liked to have a little more fun with guesswork on where the world would be without PHP). It was more about the delivery - which seemed off with a lot of context switching and jokes meant for the in-crowd. I'd say on the whole it did inspire, and made me reflect on the posed statement: "where would I be if it wasn't for PHP..."
Rating: 4 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
Continously delivering
The topic is good and the content was good, refreshing to see a large focus on customer value as a driver for improving the technical pipeline. But the delivery was a little dry. Taking a static position behind the desk contributed a lot to that I think, I would suggest moving around a little as a tip to James. I'm sure this talk will be a lot better with just a few minor tweaks!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
Graylogging to the Beat! - Take control of your logs
I already use Graylog and I'm very much in love with it, so I did not expect to learn much. But I feel that there was a lot left unsaid that is exactly what makes Graylog a good solid product. I would certainly add the alerting setup to the talk itself, especially since it seemed to fall a little short in time. The demo did not add much to anyone's knowledge of the product I think, just high risk for little benefit.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
Interface segregation - The forgotten i in SOLID
Dan blew me away, due to his obvious trustworthiness (a.k.a. the full beard). He explains interface segregation really well, with a good example of how things can go horribly wrong. Good humor also which makes this a nice allround talk that's easy to listen to.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
From Doctor to Coder: A Whole New World?
Aisha's first talk at a conference might as well have been her Nth, she looked really comfortable delivering it. There is always something to learn from other people's journeys, but with this talk you just feel it comes straight from the heart. Amazing stuff, and a must see. I always try to come up with some tip I feel would make a talk/speaker better, but in this case - knowing that Aisha isn't sure she wants to continue speaking - all I can say is: please keep doing more of what you did, it was magic!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
Queues with RabbitMQ
First of all: I'm very vey sorry for coming in late. I only saw part of the presentation because of this, but what I saw was entertaining, informative and well balanced. Just enough information to know what problems you can solve without information overload. Solid 5.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
Websockets and Torrents: A match made in PHP
Sitting at the front I could just about read the slides, but I can understand that without that the rating might be very negatively affected. It's a 4 because of that. There was a lot to talk about so this talk was very fast-paced, but I felt it as worth it. James got the entire picture across for what certainly must be considered a non-trivial (and yet completely legal) websockets+torrent setup. Also: James is hilarious, and I'll watch whatever he comes up with next without question. Well done!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
Using Open Source for Fun and Profit
This talk was all about Gary. And you know what? That was more than allright. Because he can tell his story well. With passion and humour. When I first saw Gary speak I was put off by the point he was making because it was more focussed on making money than delivering value, but his message today was _very_ inspirational (while not ignoring the making of the money)... It makes me question if I was hearing the wrong thing back then. Or maybe Gary has changed. Whatever the case may be: this is a 5 star keynote all the way and beyond.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
A Short Rant About The "Else" Statement
Yep. Still good. Moar calisthenics!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
7 Steps To Becoming A Mediocre Developer
Pretty good advice, and I'd sure watch the full-length version of that talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
Here Be Dragons! What It's Really Like to Slay a Monolith
I really liked this talk, because even if you take away the monolith to microservices backstory, you still have some very solid advice on how to get acceptance for a big change within an organisation and within a development team.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
The Pony Programming Language
I was a lot less impressed with the talk than I was with the Pony language. I'm afraid the content was just way to focussed on what went into building the language, and way to little on what can actually be built with it. (or maybe I'm just not smart enough to understand what was being sold) That being said, the speaker was very energetic and enthusiastic and that does make up for a lot.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
Oops! OOP's Not What I Thought
It's just a 5 star talk because of the way it was delivered. Anjana really binds the audience from beginning to end. I did not learn anything new but I can see this type of talk as very valuable because every year there are so many people introduced to programming.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
Security Bootcamp for Startups
Good solid speaker that radiates knowledge of the subject. Although the picture being painted is a bit bleak, this is a talk worth hearing (and acting on).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
How Do Kids Program in the Wild?
Felienne did not deliver a talk, she told a story - and she told it well. She could stand on any stage and rock it, bringing complex topics in a very understandable way. Best talk I saw at DomCode.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
How To Effectively Grow a Development Team
I saw this talk before - not sure how I rated it back then; but I do remember the main complaint was that it wasn't structured enough. I'm happy to report that that has improved, in my opinion this is now a full-scale five-star talk by a very entertaining speaker.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
Ethics & Human Rights in a Digital Society
I'm rating this as a keynote - and as such it should make you question yourself and inspire. I didn't feel that as much as I would have liked from -what I hope- is a future prominent figure in politics in the netherlands. More real world examples on the damage of being "the product" for regular people would be nice, and maybe a little more on what we (and you) can do about it.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2016)
Evening Social
a (board)games social is always a great idea at a tech conference. I'm just sorry I could not hang around for slideshow Karaoke. :-D

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