Bram Van der Sype

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Rating: 3 of 5 
(13.Sep.2013)
Migrating Fork CMS to Symfony
Subject I was very interested in, however Dieter sometimes seemed to be a bit out of his comfort zone (insisted on doing his talk in English while he could've done it in Dutch). Dieter could've spoken a bit louder as it was sometimes hard to understand him from the back row. He clearly knew the subject and had answers for every question. As a (new) Symfony dev, I would have loved to hear more about possible problems they encountered, how they fixed or approached certain things (bundles, keeping controllers clean, services...).
Rating: 4 of 5 
(13.Sep.2013)
PhpStorm productivity tips
Very entertaining and interesting talk, as a PHPStorm user. But, as with the webinars: it's such an information overload. Maarten demonstrates so many things it's impossible to keep up or take it all in. If a keymap of Mac OS X shortcuts would've been provided, it'd been easier to follow along.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.Jan.2014)
Continuous Integration in PHP
Great workshop to get to know CI and Jenkins. Covered all the basics and then some. We lost some time with installing plugins etc (Keith immediately updated slides though). For a future workshop, it might be interesting to have a more automated flow of installing Jenkins for everyone, smth like a vagrant script maybe? ;)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.Jan.2014)
Keynote: Mentoring Developers
Perfect keynote for an event like this. Very inspiring and moving. Elizabeth has a great way of speaking and capturing the audience. Not even technical glitches throw her off.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(24.Jan.2014)
Let’s Learn Testing
Tobias was clear at the beginning of the talk that this would be a beginner level talk and he was right. I feel like the talk is intended for people who have not touched PHPUnit before. It was a great introduction to PHPUnit and the live coding went really well and really demonstrated the power of testing. However, I can't help but feel it was a little too basic.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(24.Jan.2014)
The NoSQL Store everyone ignores: PostgreSQL
I felt like the talk was too technical. Simply showing us all the different datatypes, how they look in a query and what raw result they return does not convince me of using Postgres. As asked at the end of talk: it was also not clear what the difference was between the different datatypes was. It would be more interesting to see usage examples that demonstrate their power (maybe compared to MySQL?). Stephan should also try and look more at the crowd and less at the slide projection behind him. There was at least one instance where someone from the crowd tried to ask a question but it was not noticed.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Jan.2014)
Refactoring to Design Patterns
Really interesting topic and brought very clearly. Live coding is a great idea while doing this talk and I loved the preparation of the "bad" example, however, it might have been too much. There wasn't enough time in the talk to completely refactor the example, there was also so much going on, it sometimes became difficult to follow.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Jan.2014)
PHP Performance: Under The Hood
Very interesting talk and great to know what goes on under the bonnet. Brought very lively by Davey.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Jan.2014)
Models and Service Layers; Hemoglobin and Hobgoblins
Superb talk. Brought by an incredibly smooth and energetic Ross (even for the hour). Funny at the right times, always informative.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Jan.2014)
Moving Away from Legacy code with BDD
The talk was more about "BDD" than "Moving Away From Legacy Code With", which I personally didn't mind. The introduction to BDD was very good. Clear overview of all the benefits, how you would implement it... A very interesting talk for devs who complain about managers and their features, in my opinion.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Jan.2014)
Clean Code (Uncon)
Expected some more practical examples we could use straight away, instead focussed a bit more on why clean code is important. None the less, very interesting talk. Really love the quote "code is mostly written once, but read many times".
Rating: 3 of 5 
(25.Jan.2014)
Application monitoring with Heka and statsd
As said by others, it was sometimes hard to follow. Was also not really convinced to start using Heka, as it does not really seem that "ready for production" yet.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Jan.2014)
Extract Till You Drop
Very, very cool talk. As a "new to PHPUnit" guy, I got my kicks and also learned some really neat tricks.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.Jan.2014)
Decoupling the Model from the Framework
Really interesting talk. It was a bit overwhelming for me and I felt slightly stupid at times, but otherwise, really interesting. It would be interesting to see some of the diagrams on slides, instead of the whiteboard (legibility etc).
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.Jan.2014)
Symfony with Vagrant and Ansible
Really interesting introduction. Some technical hiccups during the demo, but that's what happens I guess? An interesting talking point would be the difference between ansible, chef and puppet and maybe why one would pick Ansible over the other two.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(17.Mar.2014)
Phoenix Servers
Liked the talk a lot, but maybe it should have a title that more clearly shows it's an introduction to Docker. I felt like it took a question from the audience at the end of the talk to explain how you would use Docker in the concept of a Phoenix server. Up until then, it was not clear to me that you still had to deploy Docker on the remote machine using Puppet/Chef/Ansible...
Rating: 4 of 5 
(17.Mar.2014)
The Database Access rEvolution
Even though the talk didn't bring anything new for me, it was very enjoyable! It was fun to see where we're coming from and where we're going. I liked the humor in the talk, it adds a lot. I know this was the first time the talk was given, but Jachim at times felt a little ill prepared, searching for words at moments.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2014)
Refactoring towards Dependency Injection
Interesting talk, but might want to consider the crowd. I think the talk is ideal for people starting out with Symfony2. If people have little experience with Symfony2 (or DI in general) this talk was probably a little hard to follow. People with a little more SF2 experience were probably familiar with most things. Still, some cool "did you knows" (e.g. tagging console command services). Also, congrats on the live coding. It went really well and was really well prepared. For a first time, you really pulled it off (I've seen more experienced talkers do worse).
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2014)
Bundle up your cms worries: here’s Kunstmaan Bundles!
Really interesting talk to me as I feel like I could really use these bundles. The talk was also well structured and not too much into detail so people with no knowledge of Symfony2 or no intention of using the bundles, could still follow and learn why they might be useful. Interesting to hear about the road towards the bundles as well (considering other technologies, other existing bundles...).
Rating: 3 of 5 
(27.Mar.2015)
Effectively using the Symfony components in Fork.
Interesting to see an overview of the components used in Fork. Like, Dieter, feel that maybe a little too much time was spent on some concepts. Personally, I'd love to hear more about what challenges you faced when implementing certain components. Big plus for allowing questions during talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jan.2019)
Introduction to Kubernetes for Developers
Great starter introduction to Kubernetes, sadly there was just not enough time to cover everything. Couple things I think could help save some time: - Extend the preparation instructions. Don't just tell people to install Kubernetes, but make sure they check it's actually working. - Maybe have attendees check out a basic repository with manifest files they can edit themselves/base their solutions from.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(28.Jan.2019)
25 years of PHP
Seeing the comments, I think I had incorrect expectations of the talk. I was hoping for a more general insight into the history of PHP. First half of the talk was great, funny and informing. Second part of the talk was more a "here's what's new in 7.3 and is coming in 7.4". Stuff I either already knew or was easy enough to figure out.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jan.2019)
Algorithms in Context
Very high energy talk that was very welcome after the keynote.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jan.2019)
Driving Technical Change
I really liked this talk. It was nice to have something non-technical between all the tech talks. The content wasn't just good advice on how to deal with nay-sayers in your organization, but was also really helpful for some self-reflection. It was good for example that personally, I'm probably often a "burned" type and when people suggest things, I should try and be more open about them before shooting them down.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jan.2019)
Microservices gone wrong
Great talk. Having had a similar experience (especially the "one service per entity" one) and coming to the same conclusion (make a service that encapsulates the entities that play together), it was reassuring to hear we at least learned and did some things right.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jan.2019)
A practical introduction to event sourcing
This talk was everything it needed to be, and Frank was very correct: there have been enough theoretical talks on ES, it was time for some code.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jan.2019)
Brutal refactoring, lying code, the Churn, and other emotional stories from Legacy Land
Great talk about legacy code. One personal opinion: you said so yourself, a lot of the way we think and feel about legacy code is because of psychological reasons. In my opinion, naming something influences the way we think about it. By calling legacy code "legacy" or even "monsters", it immediately paints a negative picture of it and you're feeling bad before you're actually working on it. The fact that you're working on legacy code, probably meant it kept the business afloat for however long it has existed, so it definitely has merit. I've once heard someone mention that because of just that, they had renamed the namespace of their legacy project to "Goldmine" as a bit of tongue-in-cheek humor. But still: it clearly indicates that, while yes, the code is old and probably a little scary, it still contains some great nuggets of knowledge.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jan.2019)
Building global web apps with multi-region hosting
Typical Jordi talk, very relaxed, almost non-chalant and based in real world experiences. Was hoping for a little more technical details.

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