Riley Major

@RileyMajor

Talks

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Rating: 3 of 5 
(16.Nov.2013)
Eliminate Workflow Friction with Git
The talk was a bit advanced for the foundations track, as it assumed significant source control system knowledge (merging and branching). The rebase and cherry picking was particularly challenging to follow. The visualizations helped, but so would real world examples (of code which might break other code, and how the git merge process would deal with that), especially in the beginning when discussing the strategy of different branches. It would help justify the extra process required.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(16.Nov.2013)
Secure and Streamlined Database Access with PDO
You flipped around the slides pretty quickly. You also tended to bounce around back and forth without warning. The slides are somewhat dense with code, and the font is way too small. It would be nice to use a pointer or zoom-it to highlight what you are talking about. The slides also often had content at the bottom which couldn't be seen in the back. You used "self::$table" in your bindParam example code, introducing an unnecessary distraction when trying to explain something else, as you hand't explained how that would work and why it wouldn't just be the string literal table name. Quite a monotonous and halting vocal tone. More enthusiasm would help engage your audience. Maybe pick a bad practice to rail against (always with examples and explanations, not just bitterness) to get your juices flowing. Thanks for presenting!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(16.Nov.2013)
PHP Framework Showcase
It was refreshing to have minimalist slides and a lot of discussion. It was great to get audience feedback. It would have been nice, since it's the foundations track, to have a bit more review of what a framework is. What roles specifically does it fill? How do they help? Why bother with them? What is it like to work with one? More background on Composer would have been nice as well. Thanks for presenting!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.May.2014)
How to Hack Conversations
Practical advice engagingly delivered. I appreciated your self-deprecating groundwork, succinct slides, video example, pithy observations, and audience exercises. Thanks!
Rating: 2 of 5 
(21.May.2014)
Introduction to Zend Framework 2
Unfortunately I felt lost most of the time. Your slides were dense with text but you tore through them. You seemed to bounce among the various concepts so it was hard to follow. It seemed that too much detail was provided and the example seemed more complex than necessary. Admittedly I have little experience with the MVC pattern and almost none with Zend, but the talk was marked as beginning so I had hoped it would be more accessible.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2014)
PHP 5.6 and beyond: because incrementing major versions is for suckers
The talk started a bit dryly, with a litany of support dates and release plans for the various versions of PHP which would probably be better suited to a written resource. The information about 5.5 was a bit rushed, but understandable due to the 5.6 focus of the talk. The coverage of the 5.6 features and deprecation list was at a better speed. The best part of the presentation in my opinion was the insight into the PHP planning process, the future of PHP, and how major version changes have been handled with other languages. Thanks for presenting!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.May.2014)
Why You Can't Test
Entertaining and persuasive. Useful and cheeky plain language explanations for fancy phrases (e.g. Dependency Injection is just passing stuff around as parameters). A bit aggressive and dismissive at times. Might help to have a few more examples (e.g. a mock and something inappropriately tightly coupled).
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2014)
JavaScript's Difficult Concepts
Maybe it's just me, but "this" is far more confusing than the variable scope, so I would have allocated less time to discussing scope. Also, you rely on an understanding of objects in order to discuss "this", but don't officially explain them until later in the talk. You could order it as: (1) scope (but much shorter), (2) object literals (quick mention), (3) the concept of a function as something which can be assigned (another quick mention), (4) context, as you had it, and then (5) prototyping (slightly shorter than you had it due to reorganization). That might provide better scaffolding. But given (1) that you deride prototyping and (2) the time it takes to explain it, perhaps find a way to quickly convey its very basic concept and complexity, dismiss it, and replace that content with a description of the module pattern which you laud.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.May.2014)
How to Get There
Quotable and motivational. Practical advice. The beginning of the talk was entertaining but it took a long time to communicate a simple idea (getting to be something you didn't plan to be) multiple ways (audience participation, story about apartment, and seemingly separate story about degrees, topped off with Alice in Wonderland reference). This short-changed your long list of aphorisms later. A few examples, especially personal, would have driven home the points under experience (e.g. examples when you failed quickly and/or gracefully and grew from it). Thanks for presenting!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(22.May.2014)
Modern PHP
A lot of time was spent on personal history and the history of the language. It's interesting but not that helpful. That focus robbed time from a better explanation of the modern techniques. It was quite rushed at the end, where you had the opportunity to make the most difference. Waxing nostalgic about the past also risks making folks wistful rather than exciting them to embrace the change, especially when you don't point out many big flaws or problems with how things were done. Also, while you did lay out the changes from one version to another and assert how certain changes led to others, you didn't really explain how. Without that background, is there any insight really gained from the journey? Just scrap it all and extoll the virtues of-- and better explain-- the modern tools and approaches. My perspective is that of a relative newcomer (to PHP), so perhaps this was aimed as a walk down memory lane for more seasoned PHP professionals.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.May.2014)
Obtaining Closure with Anonymous Functions
It was a lot to cover in a short time period. It was hard for me to follow as more of a novice and although I understood that there were many situations where you could use these new tools, it was too fast-paced for me to fully grasp why they would be the superior choice over named functions. The main advantages I was able to understand were to decrease resource use (because the functions are transitory), increasing code cohesion (because the capabilities are defined close to where they are used), and decreased namespace pollution. Those didn't seem like compelling reasons for what seems less natural to my less experienced mind.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.May.2014)
How To Be A Great Developer
Eminently quotable. An actionable list of checks against some of the damaging human impulses exacerbated by our profession. This talk also fit well with the theme of continuing education from the keynote and appreciating users' perspective from Eryn O's user interface talk. The pacing was a bit uneven. The encouraged audience participation during the empathy section dragged a bit and robbed from more natural discussion which arose during the humility section, and the extra time spent put pressure on the final section on bettering your community. Overall enjoyable and thought provoking.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.May.2014)
No Modes – The Future of all Web Applications
You seemed a little nervous at the beginning but then you hit your stride. The historical perspective was interesting. There were a few times where the videos showing the editing were a few seconds longer than necessary to demonstrate the concept. But it was nice to show things animated and safer than trying to live demo each situation. The real world examples (pop up while driving) might have been contrived but were entertaining and made the point. At the end, you walk through improving the app through changes involving modals and popovers, yet those are not your suggested method and are not necessary steps in the conversion. Walking through that evolution during your background was useful, but including them during your actual improvement example is probably unnecessary. You could have used that time to dive into actual code modifications with a little more detail. I would have been interested in even more evidence that modes are actually bad. Are there counterarguments? Perhaps modes make mistakes less likely? Are there more modern luminaries who support them in the web world? Are there several popular example sites which embrace the concept? Are there modern sites sticking with modes? Thanks for the presentation!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(22.May.2014)
Stop Multiplying by 4: Practical software estimation
The talk felt quite rushed. The slides were too terse for me to follow the flow. I would have benefitted from more examples and explanation of the techniques.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(23.May.2014)
Exploiting New MySQL Features
There was a lot of information that was delivered quickly without much flair. It might have been more interesting and persuasive to demonstrate more visually the impact of your changes. For the performance numbers, have some graphs. Also, more personal stories or anecdotes detailing frustrations which are fixed with 5.6 or 5.7 might help better engage the audience. The baby dolphin picture was cute, but maybe sprinkle in more context-sensitive cute or funny pictures along the way to spice things up. Several dozen dense text slides can tire (or worse, bore) the audience. Maybe ask the audience what the biggest complaints are with MySQL (I missed first 5 mins so sorry if I missed that)-- you might get some valuable new ideas or you can wow everyone with the solution coming in 5.6/5.7.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(23.May.2014)
Git and Github: Working Effectively on a Team
I have little experience with git, especially using the command line, so the git command examples were hard for me to follow. That said, I'm not sure if there's a better way to explain it visually or less cryptically, and it might have robbed time from other aspects of the talk. Similarly, the rebasing concept was hard for me to grasp. However, the information was overall valuable. I understand git and branch handling better than I did before the talk. It was also nice to see good audience participation during the Q&A. Thanks for presenting!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Nov.2014)
Designing your RESTful API with RAML
I appreciated nuggets such as the concept of the API as a contract with the consuming developers, the perils of maintaining multiple versions, and the admonition against being fancy and building more than is necessary. It was hard to understand whether or not you were recommending a RESTful architecture. You seemed to caution against using it merely because it's the trend but then extol the virtues of RAML. The talk ended up feeling a bit rushed toward the end, and it was hard to appreciate the power of tools being demonstrated.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Nov.2014)
SPOIL Your Users with Great Helper Libraries
Good organization and flow. Quotable. I like the suggestion to reach out to others for expertise on creating helper libraries in the language's natural style.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Nov.2014)
Scaling API Design
A little too abstract, especially at the beginning. It would be helpful to have examples to demonstrate the difference between the capabilities versus functional areas.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(07.Nov.2014)
The Future of APIs
This talk belabored the points that (1) APIs are important and will become more so and (2) mobile is huge and will be ubiquitous. I don't think that this crowd needed much convincing on either point.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Nov.2014)
Why Developers Hate Your API
Well organized. Great examples. Good flow.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.May.2015)
The PHP 7 Story
Thanks for the personal anecdotes. Great handling of audience interjections. I've seen a few presentations about php 7 but no one made the performance gains so clear.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(20.May.2015)
OOP is More Than Cars and Dogs
Good presentation. Thanks for your time. I thought the most helpful part was going through real world code and critiquing the design choices. It might have been even better if you devoted more time to this and showed more specifically how you would refactor. You could even frame the whole talk about that, showing the value of the various concepts you are teaching without first naming and defining them. Justify the changes; show their merits; and then explain how it is a named pattern and provide its details. You didn't really sell interfaces much. Sure, you can implement multiple interfaces as opposed to inheriting from just one parent class, but given that you have to write the implementation code in each child class (which is mitigated with Traits), what is the advantage of defining the interfaces? The trait advantage was made clear-- to reduce code duplication. But you didn't explain (to my understanding) the benefits to bothering with the interfaces. You ended abruptly, without demonstrating and walking through the code which ties together all of the new concepts with your original "dog with wheels" conundrum.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(20.May.2015)
Polyglot Databases
Good presentation. Thanks for putting it together. Some of the slides were a little dense with information and you moved past them quickly. Sometimes it was tough to correlate your narrative with the slides and their structure. The information had good real-world context though. It seemed like you "gave up" on the relational databases a little easily with respect to handling a variety of schema, though. Couldn't you accept incoming data in a variety of formats with different tables and then stitch the data together for reporting purposes? Also, you cite the relational database as a single point of failure for data collection, and then mitigated your MongoDB single point of failure by having the relational database receive the data while MongoDB was down. Couldn't you just have had two relational databases, and if the primary went down, have the data access layer store incoming results in temporary relational storage to be moved back to the primary when it came back up? These are minor quibbles with what was otherwise very informative and interesting. Thanks again.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.May.2015)
TDD: Team-Driven Development
Thanks for sharing. The talk was entertaining and informative. It was loaded with pithy quotes I wish I could have live tweeted, but I didn't want to miss anything. It was sometimes hard to follow the hierarchical flow of the latter half of the talk (the earlier part was more background story). A little more structure might help folks remember, though the narrative never suffered. It also seemed to be a little rushed at the end, which is where you can have the most impact by providing tools for the audience. Thanks for spreading a positive message.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(20.May.2015)
Composer Best Practices
Odd mix of content levels from the seemingly simple sem ver concept and numeric version filtration to the complex conflict of stability levels and tags. Presentation seemed defeated at times. Tried to make strong points with a mumble. Didn't seem excited. Regardless, thanks for your important contribution to this community.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2015)
PHP and Standards
The presentation provided good information in the time allowed, briefly covering each of the accepted PSRs and touching on others proposed. However, the talk lacked enthusiasm.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2015)
Ditching jQuery
Good overview and comparison of frequent front end tasks completed in plain JS and jQuery. I like that you proved up the concept by building your app both ways. The date formatting info didn't seem tightly related to the comparison, but maybe I just missed it. You mention jQuery Animate vs CSS transitions, but you didn't really walk through an example. The start of your talk lauds jQuery, even professing not to convince anyone to use plain JS, and then dives into comparisons. You should move some of the arguments in your conclusion up to your intro to motivate audience to care. Perhaps at least tease how there are now compatible, simple replacements for the most common front-end tasks. It would be great if you could find a few things that are even easier in plain JS. Thanks for all the effort you put into this.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.May.2015)
Rethink Image Manipulations with Glide
Great overview of Glide-- its capabilities and how you'd use it. A lot of energy. Might want to focus more on use considerations (server load, hosting and caching options) than belaboring the various formatting options (height, rotation, etc.), though the latter does provide an excuse for pretty pictures.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2015)
A Toolbox for APIs and Integrations
Comprehensive overview of modern API development tools, delivered in a no-nonsense style. A little levity might have improved the general feeling of the talk. A little heavy-handed at times, but the recommendations seem to come from experience. Thanks for pulling all of this information together for us.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2015)
The Promise of Asynchronous PHP
Good overview of asynchronous processing at the beginning. It would have been nice to provide some warnings, maybe at the end, about how asynchronous programming can introduce challenging debugging situations, especially if any of the parallel processes interact. It would have been helpful to see a demo of how an app would speed up using asynchronous processing. You could have sequential code and parallel code and toggle back and forth to demonstrate the difference for the audience to appreciate the impact more viscerally rather than merely. (The sometimes-slow Wifi would have provided good testing fodder.) Once you transitioned into ReactPHP, it was sometimes difficult to learn both the React capabilities and syntax at the same time as the concept of promises and streams. It would have been nice to start with an example using promises without any special ReactPHP networking magic (e.g. DNS resolving). You might want to mention how there is a React JavaScript framework which is unrelated. You could also note how the concept of promises are not unique to ReactPHP. I believe they are now part of ECMA (JavaScript) 6. It might have been nice to show a specific example using callbacks and contrast it to promises. Thanks for your presentation.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2015)
Navigating Your Git Repository
You have a great presentation style with energy, enthusiasm, and levity. However, your cadence can be a bit rushed. I'm not sure it's worth adjusting that for fear of moderating the positive qualities. As a git novice, despite your clear, careful documentation and visualizations, it was still challenging for me to follow. It might have helped to explain what's happening on the file system when you check out or switch branches. When are the files on disk changing, so that when you open them in an editor you see different versions? I don't know if it matters, but I was confused when you contrasted subversion and git with respect to how they work with diffs. You said that subversion has revisions which are the diff of the current change against the previous revision. But I've always thought of git commits as diffs, since that's how they're always visualized, and I figured that for space efficiency, it wouldn't save all of the duplicate data. But perhaps it doesn't matter or is out of scope for the talk. The time probably didn't allow, but I wonder if a demo would have helped drive some of the points home. Sometimes that can be more confusing, though. You should consider doing a tutorial or training half-day or day on git and github. Thanks for putting this presentation together. I think it's a great topic for this community.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.May.2015)
HTTP is Dead. Long Live HTTP/2!
Great info well delivered. I agree with Sammy's comments.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.May.2015)
Dependency Injection, Dependency Inversion, and You
Your talk had a good progression of concepts from coupling in general through the concept of dependencies specifically, the practice of dependency injection and finally dependency inversion. I'm glad you included discussion of dependency injection containers as well. I think it would be helpful to justify use of a dependency injection container by showing the code repetition otherwise required. You talked through it but I don't think I saw it visually. It got a little complicated at the end and I didn't follow much of the discussion of Aura's DI container and how it might be misused as a service locator. If that's an important consideration I'd suggest going through it more slowly. I liked the recap and reminder how containers can help you identify the code smell of complex dependencies. Thanks for putting together this presentation.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.May.2015)
Behind the Scenes of Maintaining an Open Source Project
Excellent, quotable insights presented in an entertaining manner. Thanks for all of your work and for sticking with it despite the abuse.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
Dependency Injection for Beginners
Pacing was too fast. Sped right by the intro slide. Ended a bit early. Could have used a little more enthusiasm. Good job restating questions from the audience before answering them. Hard to remember to do that. You mentioned unit testing as the biggest advantage at the end (without a slide); perhaps you could highlight it more in your pros/cons section. Could have used a summary slide reminding folks of the advantages. Perhaps it's my level but I felt a little lost as we covered how DI would be used with each framework's toolset. Perhaps you could cover fewer frameworks but go through it in more detail. It could just be my lack of familiarity with the frameworks. Maybe for demonstration purposes you could explain how and why you might build a service container and then show how it was done for you by the frameworks. Thanks for putting this talk together and sharing your expertise with us.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
The Code Manifesto: Empowering Our Community
Thank you for talking about this subject! The ending could have been a little more powerful; you seemed surprised by your closing slide. Thanks for including information on what everyone can do to help. I'm torn as to whether to recommend providing some examples of the blatant harassment. True, it's easy to spot, but it's also easy to dismiss as an anomaly. I think many would be surprised about how prevalent it is, especially on Twitter. It's great to point out how aggressive criticism can cause much more harm than good, but maybe we need to explore the tension between that and encouraging people to stand up. And maybe those who have been repeatedly hurt should be cut some slack for their strong defenses. Maybe that's too much detail for a keynote. Thanks again for all of your work in this area and I too hope that one day our profession is more welcoming to women and all minorities, visible and invisible.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
Demystifying Object-Oriented Programming
Thanks for covering this topic. As others have said and you recognized, the colors didn't work well with the projector. The bright green comments were hard to read as was the grey text on black background. Also, there was some feedback on your mic which was distracting, but there probably wasn't a lot you could do about that. You might want to repeat the audience members' questions so the audience can hear what you're responding to. I think the talk might have benefited from more explanation of why using this style is beneficial. Perhaps showing some procedural code and how it could be adapted to an object-oriented environment. I appreciated the coverage of the basics through the more advanced polymorphism concepts. Thanks again for putting this together.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
The Hidden Architecture of the Domain
The overview of the SOLID principles was brisk and without justification. If you're presuming the audience doesn't know SOLID, then rather than merely deliver the maxims, why not also explain their context and benefits, contrasting them with the alternatives. You had plenty of spare time in the talk. You also shared "The Clean Architecture" diagram without (initially) explaining why it was clean, or superior to other architectures. Toward the end you mentioned better testing and framework independence, but I think you would be more persuasive exploring those advantages before the big reveal. I wasn't a fan of the deadpan setup where you said we shouldn't be doing things a certain way, only to turn around and admit that it was mostly fine. You hadn't given us enough background to recognize the defect yet. Thanks for taking the time to present.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
Drupal 8: The Crash Course
This was a lot of content, especially for me as I have no prior Drupal experience. It was unfortunately exacerbated by the technical difficulties which compressed your talk. However, it seemed clear that you were proud of the great strides Drupal has made from 7 to 8. Thanks for your contributions to the open source community and for taking the time to introduce us to Drupal 8.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Mar.2016)
How Long Will It Take? - Estimation Methods To Answer The Impossible Question
There was a lot of great content but it was delivered at blazing speed. Presentation was energetic, entertaining, and informative.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Be a Bold Coder
You listed a lot of resources and provided good context and motivation. Your tone seemed a somewhat muted and it felt a bit like you were just dumping information on us. Your demeanor changed quite a bit once your talk was over and you were individually engaging with folks. Toward the end, with your "anxious" slide, you listed quite a few ideas which might have benefited from being listed as bullets on a slide (hackathons, small open source project contributions, panel discussions, lightning talks, etc.). This will also help folks downloading slides for your resource lists. Overall this is a great collection of information and encouragement for new developers and contains plenty of resource reminders for veterans. Thanks so much for putting this information together and presenting.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Rethinking Loops
I don't know if I agree with all of the principles espoused in this talk, but it was a great reminder of the power of array_map, array_filter, and array_reduce (and even array_fill_keys). It also encourages us to consider our code from a different perspective. The speaker's volume was a problem, especially with the packed room. The peaceful, consistent cadence didn't help. Nice use of video to show the refactoring.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Introducing the OWASP Top 10
Well-delivered overview of important security concepts. The visualizations were entertaining and helpful, driving home the real-world effects of the vulnerabilities. They underscore the point that it's not just about throwing up an alert box and giggling. Could have used a little more explanation about using CSRF tokens. Also, I was shocked I didn't see reference to the iconic Bobby Tables. https://xkcd.com/327/ Thanks for putting together this presentation.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Caching Best Practices
Interesting, valuable information presented clearly and energetically. A little long on content. Note sure it's necessary to explain each method in such detail.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Mar.2016)
Going Pro
Humorous, energetic delivery of inspirational material. The NASCAR pit crew discussion provided a good analogy for discussing teamwork. Thanks for your putting this talk together and for all of your work with the community.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Mar.2018)
Community
Full of energy and positive vibes, @dead_lugosi extols the benefits of communities and reminds us that they require effort to build and maintain. She provides personal anecdotes and actionable advice to form and grow your connections. She also encourages inclusivity and warns against toxicity. Having this as a keynote sets the right tone for the conference.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(09.Mar.2018)
Writing Clean Code
Good, sometimes controversial ideas which were unfortunately hampered by legibility. Projectors work better with dark text on a light background at those sizes. Make sure your full name and Twitter handle is visible early in the talk. The last concept, symmetry, was glossed over a bit quickly. Could use more of a sales pitch on primitive obsession (not just what it is and how to avoid it, but why). Good use of audience participation, even if us reserved Minnesotans barely bite.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Mar.2018)
Conquering Continuous Integration & Deployment
The beginning of the talk was a little slow with the definitions of “continuous” and “integration”. I got that they were somewhat unexpectedly related to each other and hinted at the concept of a well run website, but not sure it was worth the focus. Personal stories and examples were relatable. Well chosen Kelsey Hightower noting how every continuous integration process will be unique. Simple, practical steps to get started with continuous integration.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(09.Mar.2018)
Don’t Eat Grandma: Common Grammatical Issues in Technical Writing
The talk was clear and well paced, but seemed scripted. The joy of getting this information from a talk rather than a blog article would be in the stories and excitement of the speaker. You mention a beef with the AP on the Oxford comma but don’t explain your reasoning. I thought you could have used a more powerful demonstration of the confusion which can be caused by the omission of the Oxford comma specifically (rather than some of your other comma comics). Thank you for including information on gender bias in writing. (Sorry, I missed the first third.)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Mar.2018)
Go for PHP Developers
Entertaining presentation of basics of Go. It got complex more quickly than I expected when it got into functions returning more than one value and using and de-referencing pointers. I remain unclear on how all that works, but it will still a good overview. I especially appreciated the real world comparisons at the end and advice on when to use Go.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(09.Mar.2018)
Managing the extreme client: PM 101 for devs
I would have appreciated more real world stories and examples— lessons learned— to drive home the recommendations. Presentation could have used a little more excitement. It could have been more clear in the beginning which things were unfortunate realities vs recommendations.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Mar.2018)
Essential AWS for PHP Applications
Great overview of the various services which can be stitched together to make a scalable, highly available application using Amazon’s cloud, from compute through networking, scaling, and database access. Speaker could have used a little more excitement.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(10.Mar.2018)
Practical API Security
Speaker seemingly rushed through some general information and spent most of the time quickly walking through some code which used a particular encryption management mechanism (JOSE/JWT), but without sufficient background for me to understand its use.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Mar.2018)
Welcome to Our Product: Hospitality, Experiences, and Documentation
Good overview of important human considerations when designing and documenting an API. Might have driven points home better and provided some humor with examples of bad error messages, documentation, inconsistency.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Mar.2018)
Improving Technical Annotations and Estimates for Your Projects
Nice reminders to document more during project estimation process; memorialize what’s in *and* out of scope. Good tip to white board out interface to remove distractions and provide a framework for walking through the individual components during estimation. I would recommend approaching “ADA compliance” from a more inclusive perspective. Rather than (or perhaps in addition to) scaremongering with the threat of lawsuits, lobby for accessibility on its own merits— that it helps more people use your site more effectively.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Mar.2018)
Developing a Culture of Mentorship
Engaging personal stories. Ample actionable advice from multiple perspectives. Nice addition of sli.do interactivity. Way to put people on the spot with stand up mentor/mentee matching.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Mar.2018)
Open Source, accessibility, and you - the superhero!
Thank you for bringing attention to this important topic. Your personal stories engendered empathy, your encouragement inspired action, and your practical tips gave us the tools.

Events They'll Be At

No events so far

Events They Were At

Midwest PHP 2018 Mar 09, 2018
Midwest PHP 2016 Mar 04, 2016
php[tek] 2015 May 18, 2015
Day Camp 4 Developers Nov 07, 2014
SQL Saturday #332 Oct 25, 2014
php[tek] 2014 May 19, 2014
Madison PHP Conference Nov 16, 2013
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