Ian Littman

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Rating: 4 of 5 
(06.Feb.2014)
Continuous Integration in PHP
Might be useful next time to have an "installation FAQ" to avoid spending quite as much time in dependency hell. Though I did get stuff (mostly) working to the point that I saw the benefit to using Jenkins based CI.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Workshop: Improving QA and PHP Development Projects
As others have said, a more hands-on/code-oriented section would be nice. Otherwise, good presentation.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Journey to the Enterprise
As others have said, the speaker was interesting but the subject more or less wasn't. Not such an amazing fit for the conference.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Development, By The Numbers
Great talk! Looking forward to the blog post with newer numbers.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Building Testable PHP Applications
Well done talk. Had a question or two on the more advanced side (i.e. mocking DB interactions at the query level...it can be done!) that I had to ask later but Chris covered the main points in an engaging fashion.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
PHP
Great technical scoops on both 5.6 and atomic deployments, and inspiring applications of code to improving lives. Well done!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
MySQL HA, Recovery and Load Balancing
Was great to hear about Davey's testing to avoid retracing those same steps on my own, including "the new hawtness" Percona Cluster.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Browser Eyeballing != Javascript Testing
Great information, and well-laid-out. Bonus points for being opinionated and having reasons behind that opinion.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Clean Code: Refactoring
Good talk. There were a few controversial refactoring techniques (NullObjects, perhaps splitting code upp into too many small chunks) but Jeff underlined that good refactoring is situational rather than statistical, while at the same time showing concrete examples.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Modern PHP
As others have said, the talk repeated a fair amount of information mentioned in the keynote(s). The historical tack was nice and presentation quality was good, but the high amount of duplicate content meant that I didn't feel my time was as well spent.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Open Source, PHP, and PIE
Well-done presentation on interesting, applicable topics with a clear call to action. In short, an excellent keynote.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Building better developers
Great takeaways, and the presenter was a performing artist, with a good amount of audience engagement. Nicely done.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
APIs: Dead Reckoning
See Jame's comment. The "API problems" part of the talk was good though.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Scaling Applications with RabbitMQ
Well-done presentation, though you probably want to shift the comparison with other queue software up to the beginning of the presentation rather than at the Q&A.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Redis Everywhere
I've had contact with Redis before but the presentation offered some good tips and tricks about good places to implement the service. Examples interspersed through the presentation might have been more useful though. It was nice to get a concrete performance comparison between predis and php-redis though.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Redis Everywhere
[duplicate comment, whoops!]
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Feb.2014)
Going Pro
Great way to round out my first PHP conference. Good takeaways, great presentation and very engaging despite the fact that everyone in the room had been going all day.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Apr.2014)
12 Reasons your API Sucks
Solid points, and enough dogma to be applicable to real-life rather than theory.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Apr.2014)
Performance Testing Crash Course
Great, informative listing of various performance introspection and external testing systems, including real-world examples using both open-source and for-pay options.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Apr.2014)
The Zen of Tech Leading
I may disagree with some of the things stated (maybe my coder bias), but the talk was both informative and engaging.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(23.Jan.2015)
Database Schema Migrations with Doctrine
Good content, but spent a fair amount of time talking about why schema migrations are good, vs. going into more detail about interesting stuff Doctrine's migrations offers, IMO.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Jan.2015)
Defensive Programming
Well-done. Good quick overview.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Jan.2015)
/Regex makes me want to (weep|give up|(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻).?/i
Technical difficulties aside, in-depth, informative talk. All in an approachable manner for regex relative neophytes.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Feb.2015)
Dependency Injection, Dependency Inversion, and You
Well-done. Learned a bit about various DI modes that I hadn't come across before, either in other literature or other such talks. Might be useful to mention how to wrap dependencies to lazy-load them when injected, via the factory pattern or such, for instances where for whatever reason constructing a service is a heavy operation. More advanced stuff, but useful when you're refactoring an app that doesn't have this sort of architecture.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Jul.2015)
Fear Not the Machine of State!
Phenomenal talk. Showed multiple implementations of the FSM pattern...and yes, that meant actual code...to assist in the illustration, which added a fair amount of value on top of the solid background presented.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(18.Sep.2016)
Zend Expressive Middleware Microframework Workshop
Solid introductory talk for Expressive; I attended the workshop to understand what differentiates Expressive from Slim 3, which does something pretty similar, and got what I came for. There were quite a few technical issues, in part due to an attempt at enforcing environment commonality via a VM that included a GUI. The GUI made things heavy and generally precluded folks from easily using the editor of their choice that was already installed. Personally, for that tutorial, requiring folks to have PHP installed *somewhere *optionally on a VM and using php -S for serving the project would probably be more consistent/quicker to set up. That's actually what I ended up dong during the workshop. Also looks like httpie will get used next time rather than Postman as the test HTTP client. While I love Postman to death, this sounds like a great idea :) I think that, with cleaned-up technical prerequisites, the next iteration of this talk will be a solid choice for anyone wanting to get a read on what Expressive is all about...provided it's updated with the pragm...er...programmatic way of handling middlewares, which appears to be the way things are going in the framework anyway.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
PHP Extensions
A mix of straightforward code samples, solid explanation, general demystification of the world of PHP extensions and a healthy dose of levity made this workshop an absolute treat (despite the fact that I had to detour to fix a client issue in the middle, so I have some catching up to do). I've thought a few times about venturing into extension-land for fun and profit and, while this workshop didn't assuage my concerns about extension code being pretty ugly (though with PHP 7 it's a bit better than it used to be), it may have pushed me over the edge into jumping into C-land to help out there. The workshop was also long enough to cover a lot of ground, from basic boilerplate to tweaking object behavior in ways that you can't do in "userland" (or in HHVM, for that matter), but included warnings on pitfalls of trying to reinvent the language without understanding how parsing/lexing/etc. works. There was a ton of information to take in during the workshop to be sure, but it was presented in a reasonably digestible away, and that's downright awesome.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Opening Remarks
10/10 won't stop PHPin'
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
The Accidental Professional
What Eli said; solid talk, but a bit different focus than I expected. Would've fit better as the keynote to a multi-track conference maybe, but you couldn't really tell keynotes and "normal" talks apart at PNWPHP so the standards were a little different.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Here Be Dragons! What It's Really Like to Slay a Monolith
Concisely delivered problem and solution description, including concrete examples of which tools were used. I may not have used quite the same tools/methodologies (I've battled a monolith or three as well), but I can appreciate Graham's perspective, and the principles behind the talk were solid. As one nitpick, I was kind of expecting a refactoring talk, but that wasn't the approach that Graham took in real life so I'm okay with what I got.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
My Journey to the Center of PHP
As someone who was in the Uncon room at Sunshine 2015 when ircmaxell sold Sammy "you should build this CSPRNG thing", it was extremely interesting to see behind the curtain to what happened between that point and when my beloved random_bytes/int functions made it into PHP 7. The presentation was informative, entertaining and encouraging...and had all teh dank memez (or something). Big win in my book.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Taming the Resource Tiger
Rapid-fire talk by a passionate, extremely well-informed speaker on optimizing for not-assuming-the-laws-of-server-physics-don't-exist, which happens to be one of my favorite topics. Explained several cases of what's slow/memory-inefficient, why it's slow/memory-inefficient, and what you can do about it, plus a call to action at the end of making your software maintainable/less of a headache for the next person to interact with it. Great all around.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Embedded PHP For IOT
Panel was solid, particularly given that it was put together impromptu. It's great to have that many bright people in the room, particularly when they have strong, well-formed opinions :)
Rating: 3 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Building Simple Microservices Using Slim 3.0
Content of the presentation was fine, judged by a person who has implemented and helped orchestrate several microservices in Slim. However a few points needed a little more clarity/correction (JWT resource servers only need the pubic key of whatever generated the JWT, withJson() is in Slim\Http but not the PSR-7 ResponseInterface) and the presentation felt a foot deep and a mile wide (I've been guilty of this myself...see some of my own talk feedback on here :( ). Talk may have been better as a focused deep dive into what makes Slim in particular tick. Also, lose the .0 in the title; Slim's pretty much SemVer-compliant and we're on 3.4.x now :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Failing at Scale
Practical, memorable, entertaining, knowledgeable, with a call to action of "you've gotta start somewhere and here' a logical progression to do so." I may have taken a different devops path on my projects, but I appreciate Chris's take and think that it's a solid way to iterate toward an application infrastructure that doesn't wake you in the middle of the night.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Give Me A REST!
Pretty solid REST talk. For the sake of time a few pieces were hand-waved over (e.g. OAuth/JWT), pacing was a bit off at times (or maybe it was me becoming distracted about material I already know about :) ), and I'd call HAL/Siren/JSON-API and vnd.error/http-problem close enough to a spec for hypermedia for horseshoes and hand grenades (forgot to mention this as feedback on this talk at Sunshine this year...oops), but on the whole a worthwhile presentation.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Why Your Mobile Website Matters
Solid talk, backed by stats from one of the kings of mobile. I knew about a fair number of concepts in the talk (e.g. testing for low connectivity, AMP, interstitials being de-ranked and mobile optimized/first sites being buffed in mobile search rankings), but there were a huge number of nuggets of information about those topics and others mixed in, on top of a solid Q&A section, that meant that I got a ton of information out of the talk. Heck, that talk inspired me to throw an AMP plugin onto my personal blog shortly thereafter. Pretty strong action item :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Laravel: Design and Philosophy
This talk ended up being a lot about history and the "why" behind Laravel rather than the "what"...and that's fine! Laravel and its stable of products are documented well enough to understand, and there are plenty of resources out there, but as a bit of a laravel skeptic the heavy focus on the why's of decisions made, whether Homestead, Valet, the framework in general (including not-actually-SemVer), or other ancillary products was quite informative. None of the above makes me a Laravel acolyte, but the added context was definitely appreciated. As one nitpick, the response to the Great Middleware Signature Debate question felt a bit edgy, particularly given the poop-flinging that's happened in the FIG over that signature.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Exploiting the Brain for Fun and Profit
...and now for something completely different! I attended this talk back at Lone Star PHP 2016, had fun with it then, and this time around it was a bit more polished, and had the same clear calls to action for self-improvement...and that's not just the priming words at the beginning of the presentation talking :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
HTTP/2 and Async APIs
I've seen an HTTP/2 talk or two that focused a little more on the spec of the thing, but this one was very applied, with plenty of examples...including code samples...and a ton of energy. Fitting, given that Davey was one of the folks pushing for H2 CURLOPT support within PHP. Included in the examples were pieces of info thatsimplified HTTP/2 implementation enough for me that I think I might actually go out and do it...particularly now that Amazon has a load balancer product (Application Load Balancer) that's up for the job!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Graph Databases Will Change Your Freaking Life
Great topic, solid delivery. No ivory tower pretense. Just examples of how you'd use graph databases, with Neo4J as the example (I mean, he works at a hosted Neo4J provider, so that makes sense) to solve problems that are a real pain in an RDBMS. I think his talk was accessible enough that there'll be plenty of folks using Neo4J for the first time as a result of that talk, and that's great.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Hitting the Turbo Button: Upgrading to PHP7 at Etsy
Loved the gasp across the room when Will showed the before-and-after RAM/CPU graphs for Etsy pre- and post-PHP 7. As someone who has pushed for PHP 7 upgrades for a few different clients (with a fair amount of success), it's great to hear a detailed case study on how a big, complex, heavily PHP-dependent company made the switch. Particularly great given that they were able to compare against HHVM at times, weighing the pros and cons of both new architectures (something I've done myself...and settled on PHP 7 as well).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
If You Build It, They Won't Come
Solid talk detailing experiences of what and what not to do when building communities. Not a position I'm in at the moment...maybe I'll get to work on some fun platform project at a later point...but still quite interesting, war stories included.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Curing the Common Loop (With Collection Pipelines)
Solid presentation, solid live coding. Didn't capture my attention too much as I've done some of the Refactoring To Collections tutorials before as part of a previous local meetup, but sounds like things were eye-opening for many attendees, and it's good that folks now have a tool for more fluent, maintainable code going forward. As an aside, while the closure-and-collection method of dealing with stuff *is* slower than for loops everywhere, for data sets that aren't in the thousands (or hundreds of thousands, depending on complexity), you're not gonna care. This is by someone who should be in Micro-Optimizers Anonymous :p
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
The State of the PHP Community
Solid talk, with a clear call to action. Though I think that the fraction of folks who aren't currently in the community is waaaay higher than he estimated during the presentation. But hey, that makes the call to action all the more urgent.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Sep.2016)
Beyond MySQL
Well-delivered and informative on three different databases with three different use cases, making me rethink my MySQL monoculture just a bit (okay, I'm a big Redis fan, so no new news there :) ). Fit well with the graph database talk earlier to help break folks out of the M part of the LAMP stack, which is particularly valuable given various machinations around MySQL these days (though, hey, 5.7 is pretty cool!). One nitpick: no one uses MySQL 5.7.0 to my knowledge; I think 5.7.9 was the first real production release, and 5.7.11+ is what's common. Would love to see the next edition of this talk using a current MySQl 5.7 release up against Postgres performance wise. My guess is that MySQL wins in a few more areas, but not to the point that Postgres' quality of life improvements aren't worth pursuing for a greenfield project.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(08.Sep.2017)
Build a Bot
FYI, code for the completed workshop is/has been live at https://github.com/iansltx/build-a-bot (look at the master branch + readme). The requirement notes (http://ian.im/botpnw17) includes, among other things, a link to a cookbook for playing with the Alexa Skills Kit, which is quite the different beast.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jul.2018)
I Community and So Can You
Excellent delivery, excellent content. More polished than the same talk at Tek. Nicely done.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.Sep.2018)
Yak Free API Tip & Tricks You Can Use Right Now
Polished presentation, understandable despite going a mile per miinute, thanks to the pre-recorded presentation. I'm submitting this review mid-presentation because I'm confident that the awesomeness will only continue.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.Sep.2018)
Massively Scaled High Performance Web Services with PHP
Welcome to the speaking circuit :) Lots of specific content from real-world experience, which makes case study presentations like this extra valuable. A few nitpicks: 1. You had a few extra minutes in the slot and it felt like you could've gone into more detail on some parts of the presentation. 2. Split slides so fonts are bigger and attendees don't get lost reading through the slide. 3. For the "for the future" slide(s), include a couple words on why that next-thing is exciting. P.S. As someone who's used Phalcon for nearly 5 years, I'd be more excited about amphp than Phalcon for architecture-changing swap-outs.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(15.Sep.2018)
Twilio Sponsored After Party
Street tacos were pretty great (and better than lunch fare), churros were tasty, drink selection (alcohilic and otherwise) was solid (they ran out partway through, but replenished shortly thereafter, so not a huge deal). JeoPHPardy was a bit rough, but nothing that can't be fixed next year. I didn't participate in the games, but they looked fun :)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(15.Sep.2018)
Building to spec - the OpenAPI Spec and PHP
What Steve said. Flow could've been cleaned up to give you an extra 3-4 minutes of talk time, which would've allowed for a deeper dive on pieces of the process, or allowed time for questions.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(15.Sep.2018)
Field Guide To Open Source Project Archetypes
Good content (and good concrete examples), though you should've tightened up each archetype so you could get through the entire presentation in the allotted time, rather than skipping over the last several archetypes, then having to go back to one of the skipped items during question time. Additionally, moving text from slides to linked information + speaker notes to avoid having attendees just read your slides, then get lost as they switch contexts back to listening to you, would probably let the presentation flow better and contribute to a tighter presentation as well.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(20.Sep.2018)
Let’s Build a ChatBot!
Presenter apparently cut out slides shortly before they presented, so some information (e.g. Dialogflow IDs and contexts) were missing. Delivery was also a bit rough, with a bit too much time spent setting up the answer to "what is a bot", when that time could've been allocated to getting more in-depth on Dialogflow/Telegram/BotMan. Would've been interesting to see the meetup version of the talk, which was apparently a bit more than double the length and included live coding examples. My guess is that that version was a bit more dynamic, to the point that you could build a version with some live coding and quicker, more implementation-heavy slides, that would run about an hour.

Events They'll Be At

WavePHP 2018 Sep 19, 2018

Events They Were At

Cascadia PHP Sep 14, 2018
Southeast PHP Aug 16, 2018
SunshinePHP 2018 Feb 08, 2018
php[world] 2017 Nov 13, 2017
php[tek] 2017 May 22, 2017
Lone Star PHP 2017 Apr 20, 2017
SunshinePHP 2017 Feb 02, 2017
PNWPHP 2016 Sep 15, 2016
php[tek] 2016 May 23, 2016
Lone Star PHP 2016 Apr 07, 2016
SunshinePHP 2016 Feb 04, 2016
php[tek] 2015 May 18, 2015
Lone Star PHP 2015 Apr 16, 2015
SunshinePHP 2015 Feb 05, 2015
Lone Star PHP 2014 Apr 25, 2014
SunshinePHP 2014 Feb 06, 2014
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