Christopher Pitt

@assertchris

Talks

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Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
It was like that when I got here: Steps towrds Modernizing A Legacy of Codebase
Really interesting and relevant to everyone I spoke with.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
Should I use a CMS or a Framework
This talk should definitely been marketed harder to PM's looking to attend the event. I agree; it would have benefitted more from example.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
The Debugging Checklist
Great talk; but 30 minutes is not enough time to do the topic justice. Would love to see the talk distilled into several tutorial/blog posts.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
My Sql De-Normalisation
There were some good ideas in this talk, but I did get the sense that some of the approaches were not met with supportive responses during Q&A.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
Securing your Web Apps Now
Great talk. 30 minutes was not enough time though. Needs to be the subject of a workshop and/or a series of tutorial/blog posts. I would print those posts out and stick them on the faces of some developers I know.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
Dependency Injection in Legacy Projects
Great topic but I think Paul's talk beat you to some of the magic here. I would definitely like to hear more from you though. :)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
MongoDB: Dealing with the Unexpected
I think some of the MongoDB-specific aspects of this talk were too advanced for the forum. Still, you did a great job in the take-away which was to be prepared.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
Spotting the weak points in your PHP projects. Are your dependencies the chink in your armor?
Had mixed feelings leading into it; but they were gone after slide 1. Well presented, and compelling data!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
Real-Time Data Aggregation with MongoDB
Very interesting look at what can be done with MongoDB, but possibly not enough about how it looks/works in PHP.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
10 Signs your project is going to fail
Good tips for developers, though again felt more targeted at PM's. I think it might have benefitted from a closer look at the kinds of applications developers can use to assist in the fight against failing projects.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Oct.2013)
Solving the N+1 Problem; or A Stitch in Time Saves Nine
Great talk, filled with useful insights. Needs to be on YouTube.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
Puppet, phing, composer... done...
You did a great job, especially considering it's not your primary language. Might want to slow it down a little - the is a massive amount of detail in the talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
Writing Testable Applications
Excellent talk. You covered a nice mix of content at a nice pace.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
Releasing your open source project
Excellent talk. I love hearing your talks - you are always spot on.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
High-Speed Modern Web Apps with PHP & AMF
Seldom do speakers present topics both interesting and almost completely unheard of. Would dig to see you continue with this tech to the point where someone takes it on a their baby. Definitely potential in this format.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
PHP-FIG: History and Future
It was interesting to learn of some of the drama and processes.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
API Pain Points
Excellent talk, full of practical stuff.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
Beyond PHP:It is not (just) about the code
I enjoyed the practical examples - things that actually happened in production. Good job.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
Perfect your workflow with Vagrant
Dude. You were so nervous. You did a great job, though I would recommend you recommending resources for learning this stuff - there was a ton of detail (especially with the vagrantfile and provisioners) that people will not remember after the talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
Building & Deploying PHP Apps with Phing
Phing seems great, and you presented much useful information regarding how it is used. Would have loved to hear more about why you would recommend this over other build processes and tools. Well presented.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
Realtime apps - lessons learned while working towards deploy
This talk felt a lot shorter than it actually was. It was great to hear from someone who has worked extensively with the Google platforms, as this isn't a popular topic outside of Google-run conferences.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2014)
Scaling PHP in the Real World
Best delivery of the conference.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Jun.2014)
KEYNOTE: A startup story: Sending a billion text messages
Very inspiring talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Jun.2014)
Recursive Descent Parsing
Nice introduction to parsing. Not too technical and definitely not boring, though I would have loved to see richer versions of the print_r parser...
Rating: 3 of 5 
(27.Jun.2014)
Refactoring with Design Patterns
Dry but informative. :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Jun.2014)
Abstract Machines
Great talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jun.2014)
Practical Event Sourcing
Superb talk, and actually a nice introduction to some of the concepts of DDD. I wish I could have attended the workshops too.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jun.2014)
Nginx: The need for speed
Useful content, well presented.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(30.Jun.2014)
KEYNOTE: Getting artistic with code
Lots of fun.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Dec.2014)
Use Varnish to Avoid API Rate Limits
Neat trick! I'll remember this the next time I am working on an API.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(23.Jan.2015)
Database Schema Migrations with Doctrine
Missed a bit of the talk, but what I saw was interesting.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Mar.2015)
Keynote
Nice summary of upcoming features and discussion about the differences between HHVM and PHP7.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Mar.2015)
E-Commerce IoT(Internet of Things) integration with PHP platforms
Love anything IoT and this talk didn't disappoint. Lovely demo and an interested bit of Braintree API stuff.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Jun.2015)
Hexagonal architecture - message-oriented software design
Interesting overview of the concerns with traditional framework architectures and the kinds of abstractions that can be applied to solve them. Would have loved to see more code examples, but still a good talk. Well done.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(27.Jun.2015)
Datastructures in PHP: Beyond SPL - Tries and QuadTrees
These are some interesting concepts, but far too little code for my tastes.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Jun.2015)
Ada Lovelace; The First Programmer
Absolutely love that you did a talk about an influential computer scientist, who happens to be a woman. It's the first I've heard. And there was code. Good job.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(21.Oct.2015)
Asynchronous PHP
You's are so right - I ended way early. I did start 15 minutes early, but I really need to learn to slow down more!
Rating: 0 of 5 
(22.Oct.2015)
Asynchronous PHP
Thanks for your patience! I have updated this page with a link to the slides: https://speakerdeck.com/chrispitt/async-php-1
Rating: 3 of 5 
(22.Oct.2015)
Building Custom Applications using Joomla! & Fabrik
This was the first time I've seen you present. It was interesting to learn about how to use fabrik. As I mentioned to you, the length and similar appearance of the videos make things a little confusing and appeared to restrict you from pointing out the thing you thought were important. I would definitely recommend this talk to friends who need to scaffold applications rapidly, in Joomla.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.Oct.2015)
Going Pro - The Joint
This was the first time I've heard you present, and I'm kicking myself for not doing so sooner. You are a talented presenter. The photo with zeev was a bit random, but overall the talk was great. I definitely look forward to hearing more from you.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.Oct.2015)
Test-Driven Laravel
First time I heard you speak, and it was a treat. I found your talk full of practical knowledge and easy to follow along. I expected it to be better attended - those who missed it missed out. I didn't agree 100% with the process, but my approach is just 1 of many. You presented your approach well. :) I would definitely recommend this to all junior developers, not just in terms of Laravel but as a solid introduction to TDD in any modern framework.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.Oct.2015)
Sharing Laravel
First time I've heard you talk. It was great. The subject matter was interesting and you were well prepared to present it. Nothing negative to say, sry :/
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.Oct.2015)
Queued Jobs: Simplified
Thanks for the talk. As someone who uses laravel a lot, I wasn't really the target audience. Still I learned a few interesting things I hadn't known about before. Would definitely recommend all laravel peeps hear this talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.Oct.2015)
Solving the N+1 Problem; or, A Stitch In Time Saves Nine
Even better than the first time I heard it. I thing it might have been useful to continue showing the performance differences through single-query/stitching.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
Navigating Your Git Repository
Generally great, but introduced more questions than it answered (in terms of what to do when things really go wrong).
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
TBA
Excellent presentation despite obvious nerves! :)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
Step Into Debugging
Found this talk very helpful, and I enjoy Gary's presentation style. Even if he is a bit of a jerk... /jk
Rating: 3 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
Together We Do More
I liked the talk overall, but I did find the narrative arc difficult to follow at times (in terms of how you moved from one topic to the next).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
Extreme Team Building: Surviving an Ocean Crossing
My favourite talk of the conference. I can't think of anything that you could do to improve it. 10/10, would hear again.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
Exploiting the Brain for Fun & Profit
I like your presentation style. The exercises were fun, but one or two of them were a bit disruptive (which might actually have been the point)...On a side-note, the room was very dark, and the desks restricted movement quite a bit.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
From Idea to Prototype in 50 Minutes with Laravel
I enjoyed your talk. It was a bit fast, at times, but otherwise quite enjoyable. Also, next time definitely do the TDD thing over pseudo-code.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Feb.2016)
Groupies, Roadies, Rockstars
Charismatic as ever, Mr Evans. I wasn't able to give this talk my full attention (due to a work thing that was blowing up at the time), but the parts I did hear were lovely. You spin a good yarn.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.Apr.2016)
What To Expect From PHP7
Lorna is such a talented speaker! A good recap, made better with good pace, clear elocution, and minimalist slides.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(22.Apr.2016)
HTTP, PSR-7 and Middleware
Nice overview of Middlewares :D Would be interested in hearing how PSR-7 is dealt with in frameworks like React, Icicle, and AMPHP.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
The New Revolution
I love learning about the history of computation, and this talk did not disappoint. Full of colourful stories and a vista of possibilities. You are a talented speaker and a wonderful person to know. 11/10 would hear again
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
JavaScript is Awe-ful
I really enjoyed hearing about some of the quirks of JavaScript and how it's not along in its quirkiness. I think this is the first technical talk I've heard from you, and I am keen to hear more!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Uncle Cal's Career Advice
Always a pleasure to hear your talks, uncle Cal.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(03.Jul.2017)
Voodoo PHP
This was an unexpectedly fun talk. Unexpected because it's not the kind of topic keynotes usually cover, but I thought it was well-presented and entertaining. A potential point of improvement would be to write the slides a bit further in advance, so you can have time to find the "slides in react" kinks and iron them out before the presentation.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(03.Jul.2017)
Keynote: Beyond Code
I only caught half of the presentation (had to go set up for a talk directly after), but what I did get to hear seemed a little hard to follow. There are other comments here, about slides and the level of engagement, which sum up how I feel about those. It's entirely possible that nerves sapped energy, which I think slides would have helped to re-balance.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(03.Jul.2017)
Climbing the Abstract Syntax Tree
I really enjoy this topic, and speak about it every now and then. I went in thinking it might be a little boring because of that (given the abstract), but I was pleasantly surprised. I'd definitely sit through this talk about, but in case you're looking for something to improve before then... I found the Polish Notation section _very_ dry. I understand why you needed to explain it, since the grammar you defined was easier to execute when polish notation was used, but I think there are other avenues you could try, which would remove the need to explain Polish Notation at all. To contrast, Christopher Hoult also spoke about Polish Notation (in his graphs talk) and it was far more digestible. Perhaps it was because he was approaching it via an introduction to graph traversal. Perhaps it was because his visual aids were better. In any case, I much preferred his description of Polish Notation. If you explained your parser via state machines and then lightly touched on prefix/postfix, I think you'd avoid needing to demonstrate Polish Notation at all. You'd also have more time to expand on the grammar (for things like parenthetical associativity).
Rating: 3 of 5 
(03.Jul.2017)
Ethical Engineering
I enjoyed this talk. The topic is highly-underrated and you are a great presenter. I sat in both your talks, and I feel as though this one was by far the better talk. I think there were a few things which didn't go over as well as they could (like the avo toast reference), but it was generally satisfying. I also think that you could expand the talk in the direction of the moral implications of doing a professional job. I sent you a link for the presentation Uncle Bob did a couple weeks before, and he focussed entirely on that aspect (ignoring the aspect you spoke about almost entirely). I think the talk would be tons better by combining the two aspects...
Rating: 2 of 5 
(03.Jul.2017)
Long running PHP Processes
I love the topic, but I didn't enjoy this talk. I think the biggest problem I had with it was that it felt more like a collection of smaller talks (with topics more interestingly expressed than the theme of the talk) than one cohesive talk. If, for example, the talk had _only_ been about PCNTL – where you build a non-trivial script with it, and use signals – then it would have been fantastic. Or...if you had approached each section of the talk (how to use PCNTL, things to watch out for etc) by building one large project throughout; then I think it would also have been better. We all have good days and bad days. I don't think this presentation was one of the good days, but I completely understand how nerves can play a role in determining this. I'm sure it will be better next time!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(03.Jul.2017)
Pushing the limits of PHP with React PHP - why React PHP is awesome and why you should care
I really enjoy this topic, and I was thrilled to be able to see a talk by someone so deeply embedded in the project. I think there were aspects of it thought could be improved, though. For example, I enjoyed the live audience participation, but feel it suffered because of the intermittent internet failure. It seems like a contradiction to say that getting people to take part over the internet is good, but depending on the internet at all is bad. It's a difficult problem to solve, but I think having a local server (Raspi) or pre-configured, pre-started set of examples somewhere on the internet would go a long way to helping. That way, others could use mobile internet to connect – they wouldn't have to go through the conference internet to get to your machine. Or they could connect directly to a Raspi wifi hotspot and interact there. I also feel as though the were perhaps too many small topics (this is how you use component x) instead of one larger, cohesive topic (this is what you can do with React). There is a huge deficit of documentation on how to build a wholistic application, which is what people need to see before they decide to build a whole application...
Rating: 3 of 5 
(03.Jul.2017)
Zero Knowledge; Meeting the Growing Demand for Security and Privacy in a National Security World
Only got to hear half of this talk, but that which I heard was wonderfully thought-provoking. I am beginning to try to plan out applications like the one that was described, so there was a lot to take a way after, including from a conversation with you later in the day. I feel as though you gave the talk a month too early, though. There were so many awesome things you proposed and described, but seemed just out of time enough not to have had a chance to implement them before the talk. I also feel like Laravel was less incidental than you explained to me before. The built-in auth (which I think is uniquely fully-featured in the category of frameworks) is a huge benefit for people starting to make this project. I'd concentrate more on building the JS aspects closer to the native JS of Laravel, explaining the custom and repurposed async bcrypt/pgp JS (these were an interesting story not told), and demonstrating more of the processing concept in real code. I'd definitely like to listen to the full talk, with a more developed proof of concept!
Rating: 2 of 5 
(03.Jul.2017)
Graphs are Everywhere
I didn't really enjoy this talk, which sucks to say because I really enjoy talking to you and enjoyed your other talk immensely. Let me tell you why I didn't enjoy this... I think you were either too nervous or unprepared to present on the topic. It felt as though you were describing something on demand, not because you enjoy the topic. It also felt as though the meaningful introduction to graphs could have been done in half the time. I feel as though you could entirely drop the Polish Notation section, and show a lot more code about how to create and use graph storage. It doesn't have to be an introduction to a specific graph storage engine, but it could be something like "if you had a graph engine, this is how you would pull some of that data out, and why this would be better than that relational/object engine you're using". I found the "menu" section to be the best part of the talk, because it's the only thing that got close to code. But it happened quickly, right at the end.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(03.Jul.2017)
Uncon: Docker from Scratch: How does this even work?
This was my favorite talk of the conference. I'm just starting to use Docker, and Niklas was super helpful about it even before he signed up to give the talk. I fell honoured that he did the talk to help me, and turns out I learned loads and the examples were comprehensive and digestible. I would love to see this after he actually had time to prepare for it.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Sep.2017)
Let's Build a Chatbot!
This was loads of fun. I'm excited to try and create a chat bot, and thanks to the examples and references to tools I can use, I know where to start. I don't have any meaningful criticisms of the workshop, but I do have a comment about the venue. It seems like the head-count wasn't matched to the number of chairs in the room; so a few people had to wait for quite a while to get seats and table-tops to work on. I get that there can be a certain number of people one assumes will give the workshops a miss, and that having to bring new chairs in isn't the end of the world; but the venue took so long to do it that they were making distracting table set-up noises 40 minutes into the talk. That's distracting for the speaker (who did a great job of concentrating nonetheless) and attendees trying to join in and/or concentrate on the workshop. I believe it's the first time the conference is at this venue, so it's natural to have some first-time issues; and I want to stress that I don't think the conference or speaker could have done any better here. Purely a venue-related thing. [I'll cross-post this to the general conference comments, but I wanted to say it here for context]
Rating: 3 of 5 
(27.Sep.2017)
Advanced Composer - A Lot More Than Just ‘Install’ and ‘Update’
Before I get into things; I was clearly not the target audience for this talk. I could tell that from reading the abstract, and it's no fault of yours that I chose to attend this workshop; so please take this feedback in the context that presents. I felt that this talk was extremely dry. I battled to pay attention, and the lack of interactive demos (even pre-recorded demos would have been fine) made this difficult. Audience participation helped offset this a little, but after an hour without typing, the audience seemed not to want to participate that much anymore (and by participate I mean put hands up). It's not that workshops need live demos. It's that this one had nothing for attendees to do. There were no instructions for people following along (like "ok, let's install this bit of software so we can see how it works..."). It was just an extremely long talk about Composer command-line parameters and configuration variables. For folks having only ever run install or update commands: this talk may be difficult but informative. It could be improved by involving attendees in some sort of example project. For folks who use composer every day: this talk may be difficult and not entirely beneficial. It doesn't feel like the topic is exactly right for a workshop, in its current form. It could be improved by showing how to do things like create composer plugins or studying how different large projects arrange their dependencies or architecture (as relates to composer, like "how do Laravel and ZF arrange their dependencies and when does each strategy pay off..."). A smaller point: you seemed super nervous (understandable) and it carried through to your speech. Particularly in the use of "um" and "ah". It didn't distract too much from the content, but it could possibly be improved by _even more_ rehearsal or recording and listening to the post-first-hour content (when the effect became exaggerated).
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.Sep.2017)
Nom Nom: Consuming REST APIs
This talk was a neat introduction to consuming REST APIs. Your workshop kinda spoiled me for hearing about the Spark API. The only bit of feedback I have is that it seemed a little short.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.Sep.2017)
Gamify Your Growth as a Developer?
I enjoyed the different approaches you spoke about, but I feel like the talk is missing a conclusion where multiple aspects are combined into an app or system that allows one to keep track of them. I’m reminded of the SilverStripe ecosystem (http://addons.silverstripe.org/add-ons/silverstripe/sqlite3 for example) that offers a score for each module. The score is composed of different metrics, like code quality (tests, conformance to a recommended standard, included docs) so that high-quality modules surface more easily. It would be great if something similar existed, to be able to see how well I am doing in a particular project or all my open source projects. That’s not a failure of this talk, but I do feel that the talk needs to resolve in some ways of drawing all these individual strands together. The talk doesn’t otherwise sell the benefits enough for my tastes.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.Sep.2017)
Taking back ownership of the word 'freelance developer'
This was a refreshingly different topic than those that I’m used to. I’m not currently a freelancer, and certainly not looking to ramp up freelance commitments; but I still found much of the talk useful. Lots of things I wish I’d know years ago, when I did more freelance work. The talk was super, super short. It’s interesting that the session still ended up running a little over (no problem!) because of about 30 minutes of questions and answers. I think there’s potential for a topic that is: “I’ll give you a 15 minute introduction, and ask me as many questions as you want”. That’s a more honest abstract of what happened. Perhaps the questions (shame the talks and questions weren’t recorded) would also be good additions; to increase the duration of the talk. Glad I came!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(29.Sep.2017)
Your API Is Bad And You Should Feel Bad
Talk was really quiet.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.Sep.2017)
Dip Your Toes in the Sea of Security
Great talk. No prevarication or magic. The only reason this isn’t a 5/5 is due to the bad advice; “don’t use exec/eval”. Amateur!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(24.Oct.2017)
The Possibility of PHP – The Weird and Wonderful Stories of the Web and Where We’re Headed
Was a good look into some of the stories behind PHP, over the years. I found the presentation/projector issues a bit distracting though.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(24.Oct.2017)
How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Regular Expressions
You are quite convincing, in your plea for me not to fear regular expressions. But, I still do fear them. I think I always will. Thanks for the talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Oct.2017)
The Middleware Express
Cool talk. I enjoyed the history behind the middleware standards we're about to all start using. Don't really have anything constructive to suggest for improvement; but the subject matter isn't super exciting or inspiring for me personally. Still, you kept my interest with the talk. Would recommend others hear the talk!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Oct.2017)
The New Revolution
Second time I've heard it, and was delighted still.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Oct.2017)
HTTP/2 and Asynchronous APIs
Unfortunately, I was distracted by a problem at work, so I didn't give this talk my full attention. Still, the bits I did hear were interesting. You clearly enjoy the topic. :)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Oct.2017)
Big Iron: PHP Lessons from Cold War Supercomputing
I enjoyed the history behind this, even if the binary logic was difficult for someone inexperienced like me. Something you may look to improve, about the presentation, is that the slides are very busy. In the small room, the font-size and density were a little difficult to follow (and I was only half-way back in the room). In a bigger room, that might make the talk difficult to follow. I also enjoyed seeing you again, and the conversations we had around the conference were delightful.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(27.Oct.2017)
Closing Keynote
I didn't enjoy this talk, and I think it's because it had little content that I personally found interesting. For example, one of the few themes was licensing; which is in the same ballpark (for me) as prematurely optimizing for immense scaling demands. It's not that it doesn't matter. It's just that there are _many_ other things I'd rather hear about, in such a short space of time. And, it was a super short space of time. I think I was just having a bad day, and it's less of a reflection on you than it is on me.

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