Trenton Bollinger

Talks

No talks so far

Comments

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Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Sep.2014)
Easing into PHP Object Oriented Programming (OOP)
This talk was really great. I've been a fan of Bill Sanders' work since I read his latest book 6 months ago, and his writings have pushed me toward utilizing OOP in all my projects. I thoroughly enjoyed his examples and felt they made it a more accessible topic. I had never really understood polymorphism until this talk. When I learned OOP after years of procedural, I felt my programming skills "level up" in a sense. This talk was a good refresher on the basics of OOP for me and I think Bill really brought it down to an easy to understand level. OOP is such an interesting and broad topic, I honestly could have stayed in that room all day.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Nov.2017)
Banishing Loops With Functional Programming
Great introduction to functional programming! Glad David covered pure functions and the use of maps and filters. This talk also covered the awesome power of Laravel collection functions and how we can leverage functional programming with them.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Nov.2017)
43 PhpStorm Tips and Tricks
Learned a lot of great new tips and tricks! The productivity guide was incredible! I'll be using this thing every day!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Nov.2017)
Throwing Laravel Into your Legacy App™
Awesome talk. Shows that you don't need to include an entire framework to start leveraging their code. Going to try to integrate lessons learned into my legacy apps!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Nov.2017)
Behat for Characterization Tests
I really enjoyed this talk-- it was good to see how to tackle a problem first by defining the surrounding behavior and it gives you safety before you start refactoring. It was also nice to see how to use these tests as a temporary measure that doesn't need to live forever, only until you can get from point A to B.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Nov.2017)
Domain-Driven Design in PHP
I really enjoyed this workshop. I learned a lot of great lessons in defining clear boundaries and creating context-driven terminology for both code and stakeholders. It was also great to see a real world example of how DDD lets you maintain readability and functionality across your entire code base by bounding context into smaller sets.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Nov.2017)
Hands-On API Design
Tim's talk really shed light on the benefits of providing a standard API design that clients can leverage for resource discovery, as well as clearly defining what a resource is. I thought the slides were really well put together and well designed. The workshop itself might have benefited from a little more direction in the way of implementation details, but I understand not wanting to enforce a specific paradigm on people. The walk-through helped. I think it could be improved by maybe setting people up with a basic Slim framework and then building up examples with the attendees. Not having worked with creating APIs from scratch before, it might be interesting to work through building out a basic API together.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Nov.2017)
PHPUnit Master Class
I thought Michelangelo's workshop was great with a lot of good code examples. I'm excited to start doing TDD and was especially excited about the "--testdox" argument and the HTML output. It's really nice to be able to see exactly what your tests are covering!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Nov.2017)
The Future is Terrifying and I Can Hardly Wait For It
Really great talk -- not at all what I'd expected from the title, but it was entertaining, witty and insightful.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Feb.2018)
Domain-Driven Data
It was really nice being able to see at a high level the benefits of using different databases. I think I will actually need a document database. Right now I'm shoehorning the data into my relational setup and it may simplify a lot of complications to just put that data off into an engine meant to parse it. Something I never would have known to look for without this talk! Thanks!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Feb.2018)
Practicing YAGNI (You Aren't Gonna Need It)
Learning YAGNI is generally a multi-year process for most developers. I think it's in the programmer's nature to want to make the most robust and feature heavy software since it's something they can be proud of. This talk really goes into the cons of doing such, and the benefits of pragmatic, simple changes that can be iterated upon to create the software that the business needs. Jason really explained the benefits of doing the minimal, effective and ultimately correct amount of work one step at a time. Great talk!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Feb.2018)
How to beat memory bloat with generators
I have been in this position a lot. Generally, we opt to just increase the memory limit on the script and add a comment about kicking the can down the road. Using generators seems like a great way to reduce the overhead of loading 4 copies of a multi-gigabyte data set into memory. I didn't really understand them at first, but after seeing them used in practice, I get it. :) The slides and font could have been larger. Sitting anywhere past the first row made things difficult to read/see. Didn't affect my rating, since I think once you work out the technical issues, the material doesn't change and is still great.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Feb.2018)
A Review of Code Reviews
I took extensive notes during this presentation. Having been on both sides of code reviews, it really does help to hear that some of the problems and frustrations I've felt are somewhat common. I think after having gone to this talk, I'm going to start looking at other code reviews on my team, and now I have some weapons for combating the issues that arise when giving/taking suggestions. Great talk!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Feb.2018)
Functional programming for the Advanced Beginner
I always like functional programming talks and I think that this was broken down into clear steps and provided a logical explanation of composition and the importance of currying in FP. I really enjoyed the use of real world examples. I think those are the kinds of things that display the benefits of FP as a paradigm instead of making it look like just an esoteric byproduct of academia. People just want to USE the stuff, and you show them how! To paraphrase Douglas Crockford, you don't need to understand category theory to use a monad, the same way you don't need to know spanish to eat a burrito. The talk was great, slides were excellent, and so was the audience engagement!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Feb.2018)
You Were Lied To About Optimization
I enjoyed this quite a bit. I like the humor incorporated into the talk. A lot of the slides being pictures does make the slides a little less meaningful outside the context. Specifically the "Premature optimization is the root of all evil" slide. I'm definitely going to have to go and look that up outside of the context. Overall, I really liked the talk, I'll definitely be talking about and trying out Xhprof at work! I'm also interested in looking up the Valgrind output for PHP. I've never even thought to try that before!

Events They'll Be At

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Events They Were At

SunshinePHP 2018 Feb 08, 2018
Northeast PHP 2014 Sep 06, 2014
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