Ed Barnard

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Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Mar.2015)
PHP Extensions
From a technical standpoint I give the talk five stars. But more importantly Elizabeth expressed the sense of community and camaraderie which is, or can be part of, PHP Extension support and development. I'm intending to take on the challenge this summer, even though I don't have any new extension in mind to write.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Mar.2015)
The Only Girl in the Room
I've known it's real for decades but never really understood from the woman's perspective. The final question/answer is what I've least understood: That ongoing inner dialogue. Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Mar.2015)
What's in Your Project Root?
It is SO refreshing to hear the voice of real-world experience. One can advise "do such and such" all day long. Nobody listens. But when Jeremy can stand there and explain, "When you don't, THIS is how badly you get screwed, within seconds, because the wolves scrape the RSS feed," well, that's the voice of experience I can appreciate. The talk was rock solid, proper level of coverage, but it's Jeremy's real-world experience which shined through.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Mar.2015)
Navigating Your Git Repository
For me, this was serendipity. I didn't know that this was what I needed to know. Gemma spoke at the right level with a great perspective.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Mar.2015)
Breaking the Stereotype
This was a great session which sparked useful conversation. Thank you!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Mar.2015)
Getting off the Freelance Roller-Coaster
It's almost too bad the title included "freelance" because I'm not currently such. This talk was sound business advice, and indeed sound advice for getting through a productive life. Thank you! To be sure, the focus was on Freelance work. I'm not complaining about the title; the speaker delivered precisely as advertised. Well Done.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Mar.2015)
Give it Back - Getting Involved in Open Source
I appreciated both the passion and the perspective. I really appreciated the story on taking a year to build the trust. That can be a hard message to hear, but it INCREASES my respect for the PHP community. It's this talk which has inspired the most after-conference discussions, and indeed the most direct calls to take action. Shaming us into doing something? I don't see it that way at all. Elizabeth has clearly earned the right to express these things. Not everyone is going to contribute to Open Source. Nevertheless this was the right time and right place for the message to be heard. Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Mar.2016)
ELK: Ruminating on logs
I found this talk extremely useful. I wasn't aware of what tools are out there. I liked the voice of experience explaining where the pain points are likely to be. I found the slides at http://www.slideshare.net/aepod/elk-ruminating-on-logs?qid=6b516199-bb6c-4e4c-8b0e-495d983d0062
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Machine Learning with PHP
I've run across many references to "machine learning" and I wanted to know what it's about, and whether or not it's something I/we should explore further. It is. This talk is a great introduction with a concrete example and showing that tuning is important. This was exactly the level I needed.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
The Beginner's Guide to Alternative Authentication
Bearing in mind this was a short talk, I appreciated the survey/introduction to the alternatives out there.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Unit Testing by Example
Anna's perspective is one I've not seen before. She explained how to do unit testing first, long before considering moving to TDD. That makes sense. I particularly appreciate hearing from "the voice of experience" on ANY topic. I was listening "between the lines" so to speak regarding legacy code and long-term TDD. Useful.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Writing Better Code with the New PHP 7
Run-time performance would appear to be PHP 7's main selling point and reason for enthusiasm. That's a good thing, and this talk gave us good information. However, the TITLE of this talk is what got me thinking: Writing better code with newer versions of PHP. My production environment is PHP 5.3. It's the small unexpected takeaways that make a talk, or a whole conference, great.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Beware Mutants: Testing Your Tests
PHP Tek had quite a number of amazing, smooth, accomplished and practiced speakers. Ian is clearly a subject matter expert with an interesting message. I'll take the subject matter expert over the amazing speaker every time. I'd never heard of mutation testing as presented here. It's an interesting idea. I have a new perspective on off-by-one errors as well. This session gets five thumbs-up from me.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
The New Revolution
I think we're lucky Samantha does code. We'd never get to see her speak otherwise. I do know an item or two about our history of computing. I've never seen "where we come from" derived from this perspective. Delightful!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Domain-driven Design Deconstructed
This talk was the exactly-correct balance for me. The relatively long intro of books and what DDD isn't, is what was of most use to me. I've read a bit of Evans and Vaughan (Old and New Testaments in the talk) and stopped. They're relatively old. Are the books a waste of time or not? So now, thanks to Andrew, I know where and how things fit together, and that YES the modern DDD approaches are worth exploring.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Data Protection: US vs EU (PHP Tek 2016)
I didn't know the story of the rise and fall of Safe Harbour, etc., only that US perspective is different. This was quite useful to me.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Profiling Your PHP Application
This talk was a voice of experience with concrete examples and sensible use cases. Everything a talk should be. I now know of new tools to explore. Talks like this are the reason to come to PHP Tek.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Effective Redis for PHP Developers
This was useful to me. I needed to know the how, when, why, of the more advanced Redis usage. Matthew's talk showed how things fit together. I asked Matthew about pub/sub before the talk started, and he said it was outside the talk, so I was not disappointed. I'm fine with "out of scope" topics! After the talk, he referred me to a subject matter expert at the vendor table. Can't say fairer than that!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Breaking the Enigma
With the possible exception of Samantha's keynote on the same topic (history of computing), this was the most fascinating talk of the week. I'm sad that Chris only got a short-talk time slot for this one. Rather than merely talk about what mathematicians did in Europe in the 1930s and 1940s, Chris explored the theory with PHP. Epic.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
M-M-M-Monads!
Katie McLaughlin's comments say it best. I've been buried before trying to understand the Liskov Substitution Principle, given that it's the "L" in the SOLID principles that Michael Feathers and Uncle Bob want us to follow. Explanations generally refer to the concept of an Abstract Data Type without ever helping me understand what they're talking about. Thanks to Chris, I now "get" Abstract Data Type and its meaning to my life.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Deploying IPv6
This talk was even more useful than I expected. Marcus reminded us of where IPv6 fits in to the OSI stack, and touched a breadth of subjects (with details) on getting servers talking to each other. He based his talk on his own experiences with migrating to IPv6. It's always pleasant to hear from a subject matter expert.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
I'm Just Here for the ElePHPants
This was a good lighthearted keynote about community, and that message was clear. I've been writing code as long as most, but PHP community is new to me. Thus a lot of the photos and insider references were lost on me. I'd love to have been able to more completely follow along.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.May.2016)
Uncle Cal's Career Advice
Great talk, of course. This talk was particularly useful (given that it's all about ME) to senior developers. This was good career advice at that level.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(30.Sep.2016)
Application Security Nuts to Bolts
Excellent talk from an obviously knowledgeable speaker. Was able to answer questions clearly and coherently. Glad I attended. Thank you!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
Stepping Outside your Comfort Zone: Learning to Teach
Heather's material is of direct, immediate use to me. I can make code walk-through's and other presentations more effective at work by better understanding how to induce the learning in my audience. As a conference presenter my potential audience is unknown. Heather gave great insight on how to best reach the expected range of learning styles. The presentation itself embodied the material being taught. She went fast, but had carefully (and successfully) set our expectation that she would.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
Stronger Than Fear: Crisis in the Developer Community
"If not you, who?" Full props to Ed for stepping out and making a tangible difference about mental health. The talk itself was useful to me personally. My wife and I will be looking for a Mental Health First Aid class in Minnesota, per Ed's recommendation. I'll be getting the OSMI materials into my work place. Ed's availablility at the vendor table for additional discussion greatly added to the value of his presence. I appreciated the chance to chat one-on-one.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
A Look Behind Recent Website Security Breaches
I'm beset with a milder form of the Yahoo syndrome. As a company we'd prefer to not risk losing members over additional security. Nor is site security a direct-revenue-producing activity. Thus I find Bill's "survey of the territory" politically useful. I can explain things to decision makers in terms of reputation and what's been in the news. Our management is actually more open to security concepts than many, so Bill's talk comes at a good time. Thank you!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2016)
Nom Nom: Consuming REST APIs
This talk was described as being about the basics. It was. Tessa was completely accurate on all points, and that's no small feat when describing the melding of HTTP and REST protocols. (I do use HTTP code 418 regularly, by the way. It's a favorite.) She correctly noted that SOAP was prominent up to ten years ago. For me, the highlight of the talk was the "sales pitch" that wasn't. It's an intriguing product and API. To be sure, Tessa's talk did not have advanced examples, but it was described as being about the basics. It was, and Tessa's presentation was well done.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Oct.2016)
How PHP Got Its Semicolons
Samantha nailed it. Sam herself exemplifies what a principal software engineer *is* whilst drawing all of us into a greater awareness of our own heritage. For example I'd forgotten why C came easily to me. I'd already written a lot of code in ALGOL-60. Semicolons. BNF (at least the Backus part). I was unaware of what Ada Lovelace's contributions truly were, only that a failed/mandated (same thing) language was named in her honor. The tragedy of Alan Turing who gave us so much. Sam stated she loves talking about computing history, but this talk was very much a part of helping build our community, in the sense of showing us our compass.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Oct.2016)
Extreme Team Building: Surviving an Ocean Crossing
What an unexpected surprise! Stephanie's adventure was compelling and interesting. We knew it ended well enough because she was here to tell the tale. But her tale brought all-encompassing credibility to her teachings on teamwork. I'll be picking up the referenced book to see if I can learn (and apply) more. Thank you!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.May.2017)
Delivering the Most Valuable Features
Emily's workshop met her stated objectives, which is always a good thing. I didn't really expect the hands-on part to be of much value to me personally, but it was. I've not dealt with user stories in several years. It's a different (to me) way of looking at things; as such, the content was of value to me. Emily's elaborating of her own experience working in a University environment showed how her group applied these concepts, including the difficulties.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.May.2017)
The Future of Open Sourceā€¦And YOU
This is the sort of talk whose value will prove out over time. This was the right kickoff to php[tek]. Danese spoke as if her whole audience are personally contributors to major OSS projects, which is not the case. However, her message to each of us as PHP community professionals was spot on.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.May.2017)
CouchDB: Scalable NoSQL for Modern Applications
Lorna's talk was solid. We had a quick intro to what NoSQL is (and is not), followed later by actual demos and examples. She used a sample dataset which we can download. What she did NOT say, but simply emitted, was as valuable. I'll be checking on iTerm2 and the other command-line goodies she called out. I've been looking at NoSQL for a year or two. I came to the talk hoping to find out where CouchDB fits in the ecosystem, and I did. Take aways: (1) Designed for reliability on unreliable commodity hardware; (2) sync-later when connectivity becomes available; (3) on the other end of the sizing continuum, large-scale is coming together.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.May.2017)
It's All About the Goto
This is why we have php[tek]. Other than reading @nikic, it's been a very long time since I've seen an Abstract Syntax Tree discussed. I'm glad that Derick continues to pass on this sort of information. This talk was clear (but advanced subject matter) and flowed well.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.May.2017)
Hacklang at Slack
This talk was useful to me in seeing where hack fits into the PHP ecosystem. We had good concrete examples showing the concepts. This might have been less clear for people who aren't familiar with "struct" concepts for other languages, but it was easy enough to see from the examples.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.May.2017)
Software, Security, and the Public Good
This talk was understated in its significance, in my view. "The public good" needs to become more of a consideration in our PHP world, lest it become forced on us by engineering disasters. Samantha did a great job of conveying the need for this message.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.May.2017)
Composer at Scale, Release and Dependency Management
Joe's talk was useful to me personally. His work team is the same size as the developer team that I'm on, though his company is the opposite end of the size spectrum. Joe explained how they've worked through their process and deployment, which are things we're taking a fresh look at, at work. Waterfalls are beautiful, just not at work.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.May.2017)
What is this Sorcery? PucaTrade and the Gift of Magic
Good perspective on an anxious and successful project. I saw it as a view into the Silicon Valley mindset, which in itself was enlightening.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.May.2017)
How PHP got its Semicolons
I've seen this presentation before. This time it was better. We evoked more than history. We showed how it is important to what we do today. We saw the more important part, and in fact why this was correctly scheduled as the climactic keynote: Ourselves as a community. Samantha reminded us what we have been, what we are, and what we can be. Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.May.2017)
Learn About Machine Learning
Joel provided a good well-balanced overview on the topic, precisely as advertised. This was useful for me.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.May.2017)
Hiking and Hacking: Two Sides of the Same Coin
This was a fantastic approach to telling a story to make a technical point. He told of specific experiences, interventions, and observations along the Appalachian Trail. He continuously brought these observations into technical perspective. Brilliant.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.May.2017)
Learn to Succeed
This was the right topic, the right presentation, to round off the week. Leave us with skills, tools, and motivation to make use of what we gained here. Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jun.2017)
Lightning Talks
I'm giving this five stars because this time slot was useful and well done. Consider this a thank you to each of our Lightning Talk speakers.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jun.2017)
Keynote - 3.4 and the Path to 4.0.0
Useful and well structured. We're planning to continue using CakePHP for years to come, so this is important for us to know.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jun.2017)
Testing for people who hate testing
This was a great approach that connects the TDD process to more than just writing unit tests. Thank you. I particularly want to thank you for the gift from you and your girl friend. I have lived overseas myself, and understand how difficult (and thoughtful) an action you took. Your gesture of sincerity was touching. Her gift in support of you, coming halfway around the planet to share with us, was amazing. It is difficult to reach across cultures and make a connection. You succeeded.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jun.2017)
Building for a Million Transactions Per Hour
It was enjoyable to hear such a success story. What an amazing feat accomplished! Femi clearly explained to us a successful implementation of Murphy's Law (if something can possibly go wrong, assume that it will, and plan accordingly). The internet went dark and monitoring via text message... wow. We use microservices though not on this level. Femi gave us an excellent list of things to do, things to watch out for, things to monitor, and so on. I'm proud for all of us to hear of Femi & Sunday's success.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jun.2017)
Machine Learning: one step closer to J-Day
This talk ran out of time, but we'd been having technical difficulties all day. This talk was more than a basic introduction to machine learning; that made the talk more interesting to me. Thank you!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jun.2017)
Stepping Outside your Comfort Zone: Learning to Teach
This was the third time I've seen this talk, and I was able to pull a lot more out of the talk this time through. That's because I've had time to apply some of her suggestions myself. It's a difficult topic.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jun.2017)
Guest Speaker - Cal Evans
Cal's performance of this talk was useful to me personally. "Community" is a difficult concept for many of us introverts. It's great to have Cal show us ways we can fit in (contribute), and do it in ways that work for ourselves.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(09.Sep.2017)
Microservices: The Strangler Pattern
This talk did not meet expectations. My approach entirely missed the mark. Thank you for the detailed feedback; I do want to teach what I can in a way that's useful. I'll be rebuilding this talk from scratch in a way that's hopefully far more useful. Thank you! How did I miss the mark? The title begins "Microservices," but my topic was using microservices as a specific implementation (of the Strangler pattern) rather than on microservices in general. In retrospect, if I'd titled the talk "producer/consumer programming" that would have done a better job of telling people what to expect. Another issue was my approach. I aimed at the design stage rather than coding stage but wasn't able to make it truly interactive. I tried an approach that simply didn't work. Next time we'll do code right away.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(25.Sep.2017)
PHP Prepared Statements and MySQL Table Design
Thanks everyone for the useful suggestions. I considered dropping the benchmark code walk-through to save time, but feedback shows it was useful. Instead I'll focus on getting the questions we asked/answered during the talk into the presentation. That should clarify the focus and help me not run out of time!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Sep.2017)
Engineering a Successful Career Through Failure!
An extremely relatable talk. Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Sep.2017)
Getting More Out Of Git
This talk was exactly as described. That's a good thing! This was about basic usage hitting the real world. I did NOT know, for example, why merging and rebasing do not mix. I thought this played quite well as a workshop/tutorial. Jordan: Consider accepting PRs for your sample code so that you have a mix of contributors. Then you won't need to pop over to a second repo for the more complex examples. I found EVERY example you showed to be enlightening. Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Sep.2017)
The Road to PHP 7.1
This talk is of direct value to my company as we plan to migrate from PHP 5.x to 7.x. The cloud of "challenges" presented looked familiar from our own code base. It's hugely valuable to hear the experiences of someone who has recently accomplished what we're setting out to do. Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Sep.2017)
10 Things You Didn't Know You Could Do With Composer
This talk did indeed cover a number of things I didn't know about Composer, and can use. Patrick, I did misinform with one of my comments. There is a repo type of "Path." I've never used it. Meanwhile, in the repo type of "VCS," you can specify "path" rather than "URL." I'm sorry to have confused the two in my comment during your presentation!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Sep.2017)
Thank You PHP Community, I Owe You so Much
Personal and well presented. I can name a next generation of people that I would put on that wall of community influencers. People are becoming part of the community and paying it forward. Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.Oct.2017)
Zend PHP Certification Boot Camp - Part I
This talk was both authoritative and useful. Great explanation of test-taking strategies for the certification test. Good overview of the PHP language in general, as expected, focused on the level of information needed for the certification exam. I found it particularly useful that Christian highlighed what is specific to PHP 7.1.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.Oct.2017)
Zend PHP Certification Boot Camp - Part II
See my comments for the morning session. I attended the full day. The material was useful to me personally. Christian's manner of presenting was both comfortable and polished.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.Oct.2017)
The New Revolution
Samantha, please keep doing what you do. It's important to our profession. Your ability to reach the audience on an emotional level is amazing. By the by, your talk is improved as compared to TEK. More poignant yet with clear teaching and hard facts.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Oct.2017)
Playing with the New Toys in PHP 7.0, 7.1, and 7.2
Cal provided clean, clear, simple examples of using the new features. This talk provided me what I need to know to use the new features as intended.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Oct.2017)
Building Robots with PHP
This was the most delightful session so far this week. I wouldn't change a thing about the talk or how it was delivered, except perhaps adding the explicit goal "find common ground".
Rating: 0 of 5 
(26.Oct.2017)
Big Iron: PHP Lessons from Cold War Supercomputing
@namjins Marc, Hit me up on Twitter, @ewbarnard. Some are already available online, but I can do some scanning as well. Do check: http://www.computerhistory.org/revolution/supercomputers/10/7 http://bitsavers.org/pdf/cray/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cray-1 (links at bottom of page) I'm glad you enjoyed the talk, thank you!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Stop Doing It Wrong
Good information from the perspective of "been there done that", DevOps explaining the way it is to Software Engineering. Handing out stacks of books as follow-up was brilliant and appreciated (have mine next to me). ALL talks on a dark background with that particular projector were unreadable including Boyd's. In general I have trouble with low-contrast colors such as grey on black, blue on blue, etc. Fortunately the talk did NOT depend on the text on the slide. The talk was compelling on its own.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Understanding Docker for Development
Jessica's talk was precisely as advertised - that's a good thing which doesn't always happen! I don't use docker (yet) and wanted some orientation as to what I'd need to do. I got that, and some reasons why. Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Yak Free API Tip & Tricks You Can Use Right Now
Seeing tools in use was exactly what I needed. There are a number of things I've been doing the hard way that I can now simplify and streamline. In particular, the recently-upgraded PhpStorm client, and capturing responses to create Swagger definitions. I sure wish I'd come to Tim's Thursday tutorial.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Friday Afternoon Keynote
I strongly suspect we'll be seeing the need for ethics in our profession in 2018. Samantha, by being something of a computing historian, ably describes where we've come from, showing what we can become.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Succeeding as a Freelance Programmer
I appreciated having Stefany tell her own story, explain her own experience. I agree with the other comments - there is room for expansion, explaining more strategies for dealing with situations that don't go well.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Testing Your APIs with Postman
I've never used Postman and was looking for an introduction. This was a great introduction, providing examples of moving beyond the basics when that time comes.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Designing Test Architecture That Does Not Suck
This talk was useful to me personally. Michael described choices I make myself (when and what to test and not test), but Michael explains WHY one choice is better than another.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Event Sourcing a Small Library
As I use events more and more, I appreciated Emily's coherent demonstration of the whole picture. Her telling of a story was great and definitely added to enjoyment of the session.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Becoming a Polyglot: Lessons from Natural Language Learning
Rebekah's was easily the most delightful presentation I experienced this week. She came at known material from a distinctly different direction. This encourages deeper thinking about what it is we do. Her anecdotes and personal history added to the experience and made the talk more relatable.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Uncle Cal's Career Advice for Developers
I don't think Cal got to see [Amanda blushes] on the caption screen. Uncle Cal is all about encouraging us to be a community, and sure enough, that lesson snuck in as being the whole point of the talk. Well played.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(23.Apr.2018)
Extreme Team Building: Surviving an Ocean Crossing
The slides with their delightful self-deprecating humor ensure complete credibility for the message. It's a brilliant concept to begin with, using the adventure of a lifetime to introduce and teach team-building skills. I hope you keep the "Easter egg" in the slide deck. It was perfect, being in the section about accountability (i.e., mistakes) immediately after reefing and handing the sails.

Events They'll Be At

WavePHP 2018 Sep 19, 2018

Events They Were At

Midwest PHP 2018 Mar 09, 2018
php[tek] 2017 May 22, 2017
php[world] 2016 Nov 14, 2016
php[tek] 2016 May 23, 2016
Midwest PHP 2016 Mar 04, 2016
Midwest PHP 2015 Mar 14, 2015
php[world] 2017 Nov 16, 2017
ZendCon 2017 Oct 26, 2017
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