Andrew Carter

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Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Aug.2015)
Putting our tools into our conversations
I can see what Tom's saying about the pace of your talk, but I personally appreciated the condensed transfer of information. As I said afterwards, it's not something I currently have a use case for but you definitely got me interested. This is a new concept that I can see myself using in the right situation. No faults found, thank you!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Aug.2015)
Clean Code
Your talk was a good reminder of a lot of concepts that I was aware of, but have perhaps let slide! One piece of feedback I would have is that you mentioned that PSR-1 came first followed by PSR-2. The reality is that they were originally the same proposal but were intentionally split. PSR-1 was more serious structural guidelines that influenced interoperability and PSR-2 take it or leave it guide to help those who contributed to multiple projects. Phil Sturgeon explains this well - I've heard him mention it on a couple of podcasts and talks about the history of the FIG group. I have a personal opinion that one or two of the suggested guidelines are good practices that we should aim for - but that there are many scenarios where adhering to them isn't ideal. Having said that, I've found before that had other parts of my code been designed properly - it wouldn't have be common sense to violate such guidelines in others. I'll reserve judgement until I've done some of the background reading! I think Michael Cullum's point was also worth noting (so I'll repeat it here). If you're creating a public API you need to account for the flexibility to add features without breaking backwards compatibility. For example, if you need to add a method to an interface, you're straight away looking at a major version change - because other libraries could have built against the interface as it stands in the current version. If you give this talk again, it might be worth mentioning how certain scenarios and business demands take precedence over style and structure best practices. 5*'s anyway because with limited time and such a huge topic I thought you did very well - it would be impossible to give a thorough background on code style best practices on a lecture course, never mind a 20 minute presentation. I also thought you spoke very well and should definitely look into doing more speaking!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Sep.2015)
An Introduction to PaaS
From the perspective of someone who has never used PaaS before, I found this to be a good introduction to the topic that got me interested. The demonstration really supplemented the talk well. Your presentation style is nice and laid back - which worked well in the context of a small meetup. With a larger audience, you might find that you capture attention better with a more animated style. Well done :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(17.Sep.2015)
How we build phpBB: The Next Generation
Was very interesting to hear about the decisions made inside phpBB and the reasons behind them. It's a shame the weather hurt the attendance. My only suggestion would be that when explaining the process for maintaining the repository - you could follow one change to the project through from start to finish. This would possibly make it easier to put all the different processes (Issue Tracker, RFC's, PRs, Travis Builds, etc...) into context.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Oct.2015)
Don't code, bake. An introduction to CakePHP
Well if programming ever fails you my friend you'll make a fantastic salesperson. You conveyed what you liked about the framework, and what we should like about it, with great precision and clarity. I didn't think I'd say this before, but I'll definitely give it a go if the situation arises.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(22.Oct.2015)
How we use Kubernetes at the Home Office
You're clearly very experienced and knowledgeable about what you do. The videos in the presentation worked well for you and probably saved you some "doing it live issues"! Was interesting to see how organisations larger than the one I currently work in handle devops.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(14.Nov.2015)
Breaking Boundaries with FastCGI
@Martin The PHP implementation of the protocol (the default) is asynchronous in receiving requests (it also supports FastCGI multiplexing). The extension implementation is not. That said, it wouldn't be properly asynchronous without supporting response promises or a similar feature. At the moment, there's movement going on in the PHP-FIG group regarding PSR's on this topic - and I'm waiting to see the result of this before moving in this direction. The only other option would be to couple to React or Icicle :)
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Nov.2015)
How to write applications prepared for every cataclysm with Event Sourcing and CQRS
I thought this was a very interesting talk with some great tips that were clearly fed from past experience. I'd agree with James there was quite a lot of theory and some code examples might have helped get your message across. As I said though, a really interesting talk :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Nov.2015)
You should be an Open Source Developer
Fantastic talk - no faults found!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Nov.2015)
Discovering graph structures
Very interesting. You covered use cases and gave clear examples - no faults found.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Nov.2015)
Embracing change
Very easy to understand and follow. Your example code was so clear and on point that it was trivial to understand what you were saying.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(19.Nov.2015)
Diving into HHVM Extensions
Nice clear presentation that was easy to follow and had a nice progression. I always knew that I would find this interesting but I originally thought that you might have picked a topic which was a bit niche for others (extension development and HHVM!). Regardless, it's clear from the feedback that everyone was really interested by the insight you gave. Well done :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Dec.2015)
Symfony: Your next Microframework
Should have been Track A. I learned Symfony after I'd been using PHP without frameworks for several years and I think that this approach would have helped me a lot in the early days.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Dec.2015)
Dig in Security with Symfony
Nice well paced talk and you spoke very well. As others have said though it wasn't much new.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Dec.2015)
A Journey Down the Open Road
Interesting to hear a bit about Magento and the presentation was very good. I think making some of the take away lessons from your journey more obvious would help the direction of the talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Oct.2016)
The Framework is Dead
Unfortunately, this was the only other talk I got to see because I was busy preparing my own. Fortunately, it was this talk that I got to see. Good balance of humour and reason used to deliver an opinionated message that encouraged developers to push their architecture skills by reaching beyond the framework. My only criticism is that this talk was on the second track rather than the first (which had a less popular talk on). Sadly, there were some people who missed out and couldn't get in the room. This was beyond the speakers control however, and it can be hard to predict these things.

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