Onno Marsman

@onnomarsman

Talks

No talks so far

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Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
97 Things Every Programmer Should Know
Very interesting talk.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Designing for Reusability
Hard to maintain focus on the talk, but I could follow everything and it gave me a few new insights.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Technical Debt
Both confronting and entertaining. Very well done!
Rating: 1 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
The Art of Scalability
This was a talk for a CTO or manager who doesn't understand his job and wouldn't come to a conference like this anyway. I'm not a manager at all and everything was obvious to me. I expected this to be more about techniques than about for example the fact that people get hired and fired (I think everybody knows a thing like that). The fact that it wasn't a very dull presentation doesn't make up for the fact that the contents weren't useful at all for, I think, anybody.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Database version control without pain
Nice presentation and I had a great talk with Harrie afterwards. Although I don't know about anything that wasn't covered, I do have some doubts on whether Harrie covered everything (relevant) there is to know about the subject. I still have the feeling something is missing.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Testing untestable code
Great presentation. At the end of the conference I understood this was his first presentation at a conference (or was it the first at DPC?). That would explain the fact that he seemed a bit nervous. Nevertheless it was a very well put together presentation with insightful content. I also appreciate the fact that the presenter wasn't afraid to show some solutions that are so ugly they should get some sort of an award.
Rating: 1 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Agile PHP Software Development
Poor presentation. The interesting stuff were the answers to some of the questions, and these answers or insights did not come from the speaker but from other attendees. I think the speaker knows some things about the subject, but it did not get across. I was confused: Are Chrystal, XP and SCRUM part of Agile or are they alternatives to it? What parts were part of Agile and what parts were just an example of a way to do Agile? Probably an introduction to the layout of the presentation would have helped. When the main part of the presentation started, in which I think Agile was actually explained, it only showed empty slides. I have to say they had nice photos in the background, but it might have helped if the slides supported the presentation by putting in a few lines of text. Also the speaker was so nervous I almost felt sorry. Reading the other comment about the "PHP code is always dirty" remark. This was so weird I dismissed it immediately. What was that all about?
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Security-Centered Design: Exploring the Impact of Human Behavior
Great and entertaining presentation which my coworkers should have seen. Nice to let the audience participate. The only minor downside for me personally was I already knew the Amazing Color Changing Card trick and had already thought about this clip during the presentation before it was mentioned. Always a pleasure to see it again though.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Real World Dependency Injection
Heard about DI, wanted to know what it is. Now I know. Speaker seemed a bit nervous, but that did not bother me at all.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
In Search Of... Integrating Site Search
Exactly what I was hoping to find and learn and a lot more. It missed an overall comparison on what the pros and cons of the different solutions are.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Embracing Constraints with CouchDB
Great speaker. Very fast but still very easy to follow, which is very difficult. Made clear the concept of document oriented databases, but it did not convince me. It did make me want to learn more about it so I went to th presentation of Mathew who was able to convince me. Maybe the speaker was a bit too focussed on the possibilities of the http interface and I am not convinced this would make it better than mongodb. Constraints? It was made clear at the start that we wouldn't hear a lot on this subject, but I didn't hear anything about this. I'm still curious on whether there is actually a solution to this when it comes to relations.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Domain NoSQL: Next Generation Models
Made curious by the presentation of David Zuelke on CouchDB decided to follow this one. The questions that rose from Davids presentation were answered for me here. I did miss an example of a relation between two different entities or types of documents and the way it should be maintained. Until I find out how this should be done I will not use a document oriented database, but I sure will try to!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Jun.2010)
Panel: The Future of PHP
Fun and informative. I would have liked them disagreeing with each other. Maybe they did disagree on some points but they just didn't show it because it would look bad? And maybe that had something to do with the way questions were asked. I guess I hoped on something that would have looked more like a debate.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.May.2011)
Making the new everyday things
A very very entertaining and inspiring talk. I guess the reason that some of your jokes didn't come across, because you sometimes maybe talked a bit to fast for a for the most part non native english speaking public. But don't change the pase of the talk, because it was spot on.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(20.May.2011)
TDD and getting paid
thinking about implementing TDD in our company and you sure told me what I needed to know. What the caveats are and what should be realized before fully switching to TDD, this was the most interesting sheet to me. A good and useful talk, not outstanding. But the "not outstanding" part might be due to the preceding keynote that nobody can compete with.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(20.May.2011)
Pursuing Practices of Domain - Driven Design in PHP
Poor english pronunciation made it hard to follow. Creating a drawing during a talk should never be done with a room this large and a professional conference like this. Doctrine did not come across, I think it maybe should have been mentioned but the doctrine example was not clear without a code example next to it. I did however learn some stuff from this talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(20.May.2011)
Geolocation and Maps with PHP
How wrong was I, thinking Google maps/Earth was the only serious player. I knew geonames, but openstreetmaps is completely new to me. What a surprise for a cartographic enthousiast like me who has plotted out every trip made in Google Earth! Nice talk as always from Derick. I did miss something. Because the description said it would also be about storing and querying geodata I hoped to have heard techniques in doing that. Stored functions and procedures I can think of myself, but what if I need to store thousands of points myself and want to be able to quickly query them for the ones that are closest, order them by distance, query them by a polygon, stuff like that. Will be mailing about this.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(20.May.2011)
Clean PHP
Expected a lot more from this speaker and subject. Sebastian seemed to be a bit bored having to do this talk, which - in my humble opinion as a non speaker - could have been made more enjoyable very easy. It can be made a lot of fun to confront people with mistakes they're making on a regular basis. It came across as Sebastian was thinking "I'm just giving this talk because a lot of people asked me this question. Why do I even need to tell you guys these things that you all already should know anyway?" Also just mentioning the topics in your sheet without any content and just nice pictures makes the talk even more boring. If you so clearly read from your laptop, at least allow us to read with you. Complex, but - I assume as I did not follow - beautiful and meaningful, phrases came from there, but I think they would have come across better when also put on screen. Also, at the very least, a differentiation should have been made in widely accepted best practices and opinions, which I think for example was the remark about not needing comments inside methods. Though it did start me thinking. So subject and contents probably ok, but the presentation was boring.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(20.May.2011)
Advanced OO patterns
Good pase and more than enough content and fun. Some minor negative points: - The beer jokes became boring after a while and no surprise that some did not participate in the hand rasing anymore after a while. It's a good technique to keep people awake, but I think it was used to much, and when you add phrases and questions like "because I need to keep you awake" and "are you guys still awake?" this also gets boring real quick. - The DIC example of a framework, you're friend worked on, but nobody seemed to know (I could be wrong about this) was a bit strange. The code example did not add anything here and only raised questions "why a closure?". Yes I asked that question and I know a method would have served just as well. Of course this could be the design of the framework, which - if this really is the case - is a flawed design. So stick to proven methods and don't show these experiments. Closures are a nice addition to PHP and can be used for lots of things, but not for this. You should have left that out and not have mentioned it. Nevertheless a very entertaining and insightful talk.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(20.May.2011)
Simplify your external dependency management
Not at all what I expected from the description. I expected a management like overview: when to update, procedures to keep track of updates, how to reserve time for this, stuff like that. I did not expect to find myself in the middle of all these complex tools. The fact that the code base wouldn't be complete while coding was a bit underestimated to me: What about a designer that also needs to checkout, change, test and commit a project? No doubt the contents of the talk are useful to some and the talk wasn't bad. Just not what I came for.
Rating: 1 of 5 
(21.May.2011)
First Class APIs
The idea - there really only was one idea in the talk - was completely new to me. It was clear after 15 minutes into the talk, where the slide came of the API between the database and the MVC and it was very very clear. You can support that with examples, but really, after 5 more minutes everybody got the message and it should have stopped there. We're an intelligent audience so don't repeat yourself 20 times. It's a new idea, but it's not that complex. The skills to give a decent talk are clearly present. Pronunciation, intonation and pace are all pleasant to listen to. The way you stood and moved around on stage however were not that pleasant, you need to work on that. The message was a nice one to deliver, but it was repeated to much. Even in the conclusion you still felt the need to give an example and the example was twitter, again, which already was mentioned I don't know how many times. Skills are there, message was ok, but I have to give you the worst rating because it was the most boring talk of the conference because of the repetition. I had a hard time staying awake and I didn't even attended the social.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(21.May.2011)
Profiling PHP Applications
nice content but the demos were poorly prepared. You shouldn't update all the software on your laptop including the software you want to demo right before the conference. For a demo it's important to test everything, make everything work, and after that: change nothing. Demos are a critical part of a talk can easily go wrong and it's a high risk to bring one into your talk. If you make the decision to do so, you should treat it more carefully. A lot of useful content came across, and as a user of xDebug I want to thank you for giving us a wonderful tool like that. You have lots of interesting stuff to tell us and you know how to, but because of the not working demos and apologies for it I only can give you 3 out of 5.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(21.May.2011)
Writing documentation the easy way
Also expected more about technical code documentation. The speaker was obviously nervous but not to the point where it became a problem. The speed of the content was too fast. The sheets, I think, were ok, but some sheets came and went without all the contents being handled. If you have sheets with bulleted lists make sure you mention and explain them. Not that unpleasant to attend to, but I felt like a missed 80% of what you wanted to tell me.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2011)
Agility and Quality
A lot better then yesterdays talk from the same speaker, but still a bit boring. A lot of interesting techniques and methods came by that are worth examining.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2011)
Practical Git
A big WOW for the presentation software used and how it was used. I didn't even know such things were possible. Nice to watch and listen to. You explained some very interesting things about git to me. Still puzzled by the complexity of git that designers will never be able to use, so not convinced to switch from bzr (also a DVCS) to git, but that was clearly not the intention.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.May.2011)
Closing Keynote: Open Teams
Good and very entertaining talk. Although I am a developer and a team lead I do not agree with everything. Although I can't put my finger on why, it was not nearly as good as the opening keynote from the day before, so 4 out of 5.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Jun.2012)
The Agile Toolbox 2012 - Practices
A very complete workshop in both the theoretical and the practical way. Everybody was motivated to participate from the start which was very successful. I liked very much that it was a small but diverse group of people. Oh... and I got to play with lego!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(08.Jun.2012)
How not to design a toad
Started slow but had some interesting bits. Expected more about user interfaces. Try to use more lists in your sheets instead of lots of sheets with only a few words.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(08.Jun.2012)
Programming Style and Your Brain
I was already a great believer in coding styles, but this talk gave some nice new insights. Not boring at all.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(08.Jun.2012)
Designing Beautiful Software
Good, but I expected a bit more in depth insights, like for example about design patterns and when to use which.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
Continuous data processing and PHP
Ok speaker but the subject was the complete project, not just data processing. I expected more strategies and tools (besides the message queue in a cloud) instead of tweaks. Sticking to MySQL because it's familiar is a decision I could easily make too and I came to this talk to hear other alternatives and why to choose a particular one. This probably should have been a topic of research in the project, but of course I don't know all the factors involved. To talk about decisions made that were completely unrelated to the subject was an obvious mistake. These are things an attendee probably already knows and if they don't it is covered too briefly. Not a boring talk and kind of interesting, but while I think I didn't know a lot about dealing with big data I didn't learn a lot. I still feel I don't know enough to choose a direction when I will be dealing with big data.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
Event and Signal Programming
Natural speaker, but though the walking around worked, it was a bit too much. The theoretical part was very interesting though maybe a bit too fast. The practical part was not very structured. Maybe it's a good idea to not completely split the theoretical and practical parts but show some practices after a pattern.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
Rasmus Lerdorf will do the Saturday opening keynote!
Very nice to see what the developers of php have to deal with and to see a point of view from that side. The very start looked like a bit of a mid life crisis or something. Understandable and it's ok to let people ask themselves how their work matters but not really useful or motivating to let everybody know you really seem to be having second thoughts.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
Puppet for dummies
I really got interested in puppet and definately am going to see if I can use it in some way. When the situation at the company I work for was described almost spot on at the beginning of the talk it really got my attention. I missed some practical issues about dealing with hosting companies and tools they use for maintaining their servers, even when they are dedicated. So telling people there really is no reason to not use something like puppet is simply not true. The slide about the advantage of just having to say: "we need a webserver" instead of "apt-get install..." or any other variant is bogus. This advantage didn't seem to be one because later on it showed you still need the package name and a distinction between different types of OS. The adavantage really is to centrally manage multiple servers and being able to version it. These advantages could have been on this slide. Excellent speaking style.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
Travis CI - Distributed CI for the masses!
I was bashed for not testing my code, but I guess it's a good thing this is done. Because I know I should be doing something about this and I am working on it. Good speaking style, but the subject just didn't stick. I think I missed some overviews or something.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
From the Ground Up: Hands-on coding, deploying, and scaling with AWS
Really heavy for the last round of the conference but fun to attend. Don't know if you put in the mistakes on purpose or really by accident but they were fun and enjoyable. If they were a real mistake you should keep them and maybe substitute them with something harmless. Natural speaker and I think it shouldn't be a problem in a conference to do a compelete talk at the command line though I would have liked it to have been a little slower at the critical points.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
Mobile is huge in Japan
It was so obvious this was intended for a US audience only. You just don't shock any European by saying that Asia has countries with bigger economies than that of Canada! Some statistics did say something but there were just too much. It's nice you did add something extra to your message with every statistic or else it would have been really boring. Though the keynote ended sooner than planned it really shouldn't have lasted any longer. I didn't completely agree with the message either: I don't think Mobile will completely replace the desktop market although I guess it will probably be bigger. At the end it was said that we can probably solve the problem of having 4 bilion extra internet users and contributors. I think this is a wrong statement: I think THEY will solve the problem themselves much quicker, because they don't care about all the old technologies we have to still deal with every day. Google, Apple, Facebook: In the future they will have larger Asian or even African counterparts and companies that will fill completely new gaps. Not a bad speaker though.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
Mobile Performance Considerations
Natural speaker but the talking was way too fast and unstructured. Also I had trouble figuring out what the conclusion would be. "So we have this problem and than you should do this but then again you really shouldn't because of this reason so you can do this but that has disadvantages too so maybe you can do this and now we will have the next problem which lead me to the next the subject" Uhm... so what was your conclusion of that problem? I experienced this many times. I really learnt a lot about pitfalls and possible techniques but I didn't get an overview of when to choose what technique and why.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
Fast, Not Furious
I got some advantages of xhprof over xdebug but it didn't really blow me away though I feel like it maybe should have. Fun presentation and did get to learn a few things.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Jun.2012)
PHAR, the PHP .exe format
Great and clear talk about what phar is, though I don't think I will have a use for it myself.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
A Web Of Identity
Not a great opening keynote: the ones of the next day would have been a lot better for the conference as an opening keynote. Nice and pleasant way of speaking but the message of one web was brought confusingly and with to many words. It just took too long. If you're gonna use NLP: don't tell us. If people don't know a line of a song doesn't mean they don't know the song or the artist. To make this conclusion is unfair and not funny. Ok, I laughed, and other people did too, but my laughs were ones of discomfort and politeness: not the greatest way to be "funny" though successful for some people (that I don't like). I wasn't bored or even angry or anything. I just did not get inspired or learned anything and did not see how anybody else could have.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Unbreakable Domain Models
Got some of what I came for. Not sure if it's even possible to get all ;)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Reverse caching proxies: Varnish or Nginx?
Clear, nice and interesting talk.
Rating: 1 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Fun with BIG Data with various databases
I thought there would be a prize or something if somebody would guuess how many typos there were. If you're dyslectic: let you're audience know AND let somebody see your presentation before giving it. If not: please read your own presentation. Great start with the whole powerpoint joke, but that's all the positive there is. If you're gonna take a lot of time (too much?) to let people see the differences of performances between queries on different tables, you really HAVE TO take a little time to let them see some "show create tables" to show them what causes it. But only a phrase like "you should learn and use indexes" would have made your point. You could also mention the mysql limit (and common pitfall) of 1 index per query per table and mention explain, but you didn't. It's ok to point out all the possibilities briefly (very useful even) but you've made the wrong choices of where to go in depth and where you did you did it in a wrong way. Because of this you couldn't even take the time to only point out all the topics.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Modern HTTP Architecture
Liked the talk, but didn't hear anything new or had any new insights and I don't feel like I know a lot about the subject.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
High Performance Websites with Scalable Workers
Definitely gonna check out the tools mentioned. Clear and pleasant talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Growth Hacking for Humans
Very inspiring.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Composer for busy developers
Spot on for somebody that didn't know about composer and always went through a lot of trouble to avoid pear. Definitely gonna use composer now.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Emergent Design with phpspec
A lot of knowledge in all areas came out in a very natural way. Not to convinced about full TDD and phpspec but I learned a lot of useful stuff nevertheless.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Measuring and Logging Everything in Real Time
Very useful talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Worse Is Better, for Better or for Worse
Fun, great, interesting. Got a tiny bit boring near the end. Love how some things were put in a perspective probably all of us either never have or don't have most of the time.
Rating: 1 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Device Advice
I came here to learn about testing on mobile devices, but that was not what this talk was about. The only message was how cool it is to start an open device lab, and even that didn't come across because it seems that if you do, you still are lucky if you get a visitor once a week. The history of the internet? Why? Why I should test? Every developer knows he should test, other speakers urge yyou to test toom but that is about automated testing. This was clearly not the case here. Multiple sheets about brushing your teeth? Why!? Just mention the comparison with teeth brushing and everybody knows what you mean. I hoped to get information about automated testing on mobile devices, but this talk wasn't about testing at all. Total waste of my time.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(09.Jun.2013)
Building Mobile Apps with AngularJS and PhoneGap
Very interesting talk about angular. Lost me at the Phonegap part, because I have no knowledge at all about that subject and this seemed required.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
Hacking Foresight from Hindsight
interesting and useful, but got boring in the middle part where he was to much focused and getting into details on his own experiences. And although I agree to some extend, I also think there should be some nuance in the message that everybody in the business does everything for themselves primarily.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
Using Docker to orchestrate local PHP development
The layers seemed to be important but weren't really covered, though I did somehow get the idea, I think. The use of time could be better indeed: I really don't need to see everything to believe it works
Rating: 2 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
Artificial Neural Networks on a Tic Tac Toe console application
Symfony console is great. But it did not need to be explained for this to work. I was waiting to find out how or where the network was trained but I missed that. Where and how did the network find out what was a bad decision and a good decision? The demos were too fast. "Player X won" but you never see the last move or end state of the board.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
The quest for global design principles
Very interesting and clear, though I think this talk and the talk on Saturday could have easily been merged since the overlap is huge.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
The Three Dimensions of Testing
Nothing to add
Rating: 3 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
Asynchronous PHP
I liked the presentation but I missed clear examples of practical usages. I liked the misuse of generators, but I think I disapprove. It does not make for readable code.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
The true value of objects
Clear, interesting and useful, though I think it was a bit overdone: the part for displaying the usernames, I think, should be a template helper. It is clearly display logic which should not reside in a value object.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
Application Logging & Logstash
Got me interested, would have been nice to see more on how to manipulate and analyze the log data. I have a strong feeling a lot more could be done with the data in elasticsearch and/or Kibana. It would have been nice to see an example of more complex and/or real world log analysis.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
Hexagonal architecture - message-oriented software design
Clear talk and interesting talk. I was curious what the six sides would stand for and was a bit disappointed to find out it was only six sides because it makes for nice diagrams. I feel like the rest of the talk had a lot of overlap with Fridays talk and they could have been merged easily.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
Composer The Right Way
Great talk. Funny to see in a later talk a speaker did it "wrong". "Add this to your composer.json..." ;-) I was very tempted to make a remark.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
Software architecture in an agile age
Not what I was expecting at all (see other comments) and did not learn anything.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jun.2015)
Behind the Scenes of Maintaining an Open Source Project
Insightful and entertaining.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Keynote : The New Revolution
Certainly inspiring but longer than it needed to be. The walking back and forth was a bit annoying.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Progressive Web Apps
Very interesting. I'm sold and I learned some new things.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Building teams, what can we learn from professional sports
To much focus on the sports, but interesting nevertheless.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Advanced Laravel: Avoid unified data models to make software development easier
Great insight in how to prevent a model from exploding for different feature. I think it wouldn't be wise to store everything redundant, but there could be use cases where this might be useful.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
The Science of Code Reviews
Best talk I went to in the conference. Very interesting and great responses to the audience.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Guided by Examples - Software Driven by Requirements
Very interesting, and I liked a lot that the focus was on the process of BDD instead of just the tools, as in so many other blog posts or talks. It was a bit hard to follow because some words did not come out fluently and the speaker seemed out of breath for the duration of the talk.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Mastering message Queues
Very interesting, though I felt the title of the topic was a bit misleading. The talk was more about architectural patterns around message queues than about message queues themselves. Having CQRS or Service Bus in the title would have made more sense to me.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Machine learning and trend analysis in PHP
Talk was ok, but the general theory could have been dealt with far more quickly and I would like to have seen some real world examples because I feel like the two algorithms shown are very difficult to apply to sets with multiple types of data like log files.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Journey through "unhappy path" - Dealing with exceptional conditions
Great talk, and I left with some useful ideas. Don't stretch it to 45 mins, unless you can add some completely different insights, because I think it had the right speed.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Are you out of memory, or have plenty to spare?
I did not feel like this was an advanced talk, only basic computer knowledge was needed beforehand which can easily be expected from anyone attending. I did learn some expected stuff about the tools to read memory usage, but I also expected to learn something about what to do with this information in certain circumstances.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
IoC containers beyond constructor injection
Interesting, but presentation skills could be improved. I missed some pros and cons about certain approaches for maintaining large code bases.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Keynote : Controlling the variables
Very inspiring and I liked the energy in the talk a lot. But I do not agree with everything. Some people are not presented with the chances or do not have the ability to take the chances you are talking about. This can be influenced by a wide variety of factors. Although, in my experience, these people are not the ones complaining and you certainly have a point about that. Also, I do not like the harsh guy at all, you've shown several videos of. Although I do agree with him, it is way too harsh and could be hurtful for people who do not have the opportunities or abilities. I feel those videos add nothing to the point you are trying to make. Also, about the part where the "disaster struck": It must have been very difficult and you have my sympathies for that, but the image shown, to me suggested it was a lot worse. Also realize that everybody has their own share of disaster stories, which are impossible to compare, and from your story there is the danger of people feeling guilty to have a difficult time with disasters happening to them. I'm not saying this is what you mean to imply, but there is the danger of people interpreting it that way.

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