Lucia Velasco

Comments

(Show Details)
(Hide Details)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Apr.2017)
Secure your web application with 2FA
It was pitched perfectly for me. The combination of technical concepts with straightforward language was really helpful, I came away feeling that I'd learnt a lot about one subject, including actionable information and an understanding of some of the technical language (acronyms) in this area. It was very useful that concise yet complete tidbits of whats and hows were peppered throughout without being code heavy (what should I use, how should I use it), as a result 2FA feels very doable without the need to re-research it. I benefitted from the frequent reminders that users are inherently lazy, as well as the questions afterwards which probed the feasibility of this becoming mainstream.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jul.2017)
Graphs are Everywhere
I love this topic!! Loved the visual diagrams and stepping through the explanations! Sometimes took me a minute to get the humour, but all really entertaining and well delivered!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jul.2017)
Living With Legacy
I really enjoyed this talk, it was really insightful and raised points that people can be in denial about when upgrading legacy (I liked the reference to when "agile" == waterfall + sprints)! The bare bones slide deck really worked with your delivery, I'd like to see the slides grouped into subjects, each introduced with a coloured title slide. Super flattered by the references to my talk :D Thank you, great talk!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(18.Oct.2017)
Lets Hack a Website
I really enjoyed this! Absolutely a one stop shop for the beginner developer - everyone has committed these crimes earlier in their career! A lot of content for the amount of time (not that that's a bad thing!) - I would have enjoyed some section titles and at least one mandatory cat picture for a brain break! Thank you.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(18.Oct.2017)
Content Security Policies: Let's Break Stuff
Wonderful charisma, powerful examples, useful content and practical advice. Thank you for trekking to the SW for us!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Jan.2018)
Command and (e)mission Control
This was a really enjoyable talk. I loved all the jokes and the audience interaction. I would have preferred smaller examples because I wasn't always sure where to look for the key point (eg methods not whole classes) and longer on the definition and diagram slides. It was really interesting learning about how WorldFirst does stuff, I'd be interested in a talk on that stuff in the future, too. Great stage presence, good topic, thank you!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Apr.2018)
Static Site Generators, PHP, and The Cuban Revolution
I loved the comedy and that the dialogue enriched the presentation so effectively. I appreciated that a variety of options were presented at the end, which might be suitable for a range of people. I'm so sorry, I can't think of anything to improve, except more Cuban Revolution?!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Apr.2018)
How to not be a cool developer
Personable, excellent premise. The naming in the examples was really clear and helped me understand what was going on. Loved it! I liked that you referred to the previous talk (maybe JavaScript is just medium speed?!). I recommend you stand closer to the slides, my periphery didn't notice the changes in some of the slides! I would have liked a recap on the why at the end.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Apr.2018)
Speedy Seeding for Load Testing
I loved that the problem and solution were clearly (and frustratingly) demonstrated! Good length and quantity of content for a lightning talk. I would recommend getting a laser pointer or a really long ruler so you don't have to enter the Matrix! The tone felt less upbeat than the previous speakers.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Apr.2018)
Using a framework or not
I love that you outlined a perspective that few people can or even try to coin (why a student would choose to learn a language in a framework). Some of the points were excellent but they were not delivered succinctly. I liked the summary!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Apr.2018)
Not using the Git Command Line
I loved this talk, it was thoughtful and thought provoking. I think the visibility point is really important. You gave me a better understanding of git GUIs, too! I liked that you walked to the other side of the presentation instead of walking in front to point. For a lightning talk it might have been beneficial to condense some of the points!
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Apr.2018)
Devkit. By the People, For the People.
A man after my own heart (efficiency is my raison d'etre)! This brought up some sensible points I hadn't considered, such as that it should be easier to push code to these than your prod env. I enjoyed when the points on the slides were paraphrased rather than read out, before being built upon. I'd love to see more of this! Also, I think a more upbeat tone throughout would have kept me more engaged, the mellow tone was lovely but not as effective at this time of night.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Apr.2018)
Development Dinosaurs
Speaker always hilarious, love the attitude, works fantastically as an end of the night speaker. Content appears effective, great idea, may implement it in my office.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Apr.2018)
Effective Code Review
Refreshing intro! Loved use of props!!! Needs more visibility - maybe a thick, bright ribbon, higher up if possible? V good analogy. I love life-or-death analogies for code because sometimes it really is. It would be good to give examples of why bugs cost us and increase in cost, briefly. The arrow on the graph was really powerful. Text on your personal info slide was too close to the edge, and a bit lightweight for the amount of text on the slide (did that make sense?). I'd prefer more paraphrasing of the slides or examples of the bullet points in the slides. I love that you went into the benefits of code review outside of bug catching. I'm going to use those evolvability stats in a spike next week - useful!! My big fear when receiving very shallow reviews are evolvability bugs slipping under the radar. I think it would be powerful to gesture to the green line at the beginning, when it's higher than the blue line, to acknowledge the upfront cost. I live and breathe for the security review side!! I love the 'How many tests do we need', they make me feel clever and they make a very good point. I love that you talked about bad (or sometimes just unreadable/wizard magic) code, that's so important to me. Cost of writing code slide was cool and well presented, I like fat graphics. Reviewing naming! Yaaaasss! Slash documentation? Are your code review standards/guidelines public? If so, please share it! Talking about leveraging your IDE is really good, but a lot of it sounds like benefits after the fact of code review rather than IN code review? Please mention the benefit of a no blame culture - which comes from the shared responsibility of the codebase. It is especially valuable because people are more likely to own/admit less than perfect things. Do you review commit messages? Those Cisco tips were REALLY valuable. Will bear that in mind. I would add the receiving review tip of actioning feedback to the same standard as the rest of your code - I find a lot of people rush it or hack it because they want to their PR thru asap, but it just slows the follow up review. Would potentially recommend putting a cross and a tick into the good/bad commit head circles for people who are red/green colour blind. Really appreciated the summary slide, it was very good. The conversation on reviewing juniors was really helpful and validating for me, thank you for answering my questions. General delivery was really good, would have enjoyed a bit more humour to break it up, but overall it was informative, smart, comprehensive and useful. Thank you!!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Apr.2018)
Progressive Web Apps
Slightly too much code for me to digest and the speed of talking was really fast. I really enjoyed the summary and the conversations throughout - I think they enriched it. Well done! For more feedback see email
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jun.2018)
Build your own Neural Network, with PHP!
Really accessible intro - thank you for encouraging us to ask questions at any point! It was really helpful that you recommended some resources and that you interspersed the technical stuff with comedy. I struggled to visualise what figure each step might produce - perhaps do an example annotating each line with an example value at that point? I really enjoyed it and I have a much better understanding of ML, thank you!!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jun.2018)
Time Zones and Calendars are a PITA
I live for this subject! I loved audience participation. I've enjoyed learning both what I can do and what I should do. Excellent delivery! Can't think of any improvements... would have liked a gif? Thank you!!!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Jul.2018)
Get out of jail "free" cards - tips and quick fixes to get you out of sticky situations with servers, websites and APIs
I loved the pet/cattle/panda analogy, it was really accessible. And you talked about almost all my favourite git commands (you missed cherry-pick, though)! I would have enjoyed more conversation between the two of you. Where can I find the slides? Thank you both for coming to talk for us!!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Jul.2018)
Performance optimisation: how do I go about it?
I found this really valuable. This talk made optimisation and benchmarking really clear, straightforward and accessible for me. I think I didn't need as long on micro optimisation, but it was great that you raised it. I'm glad you mentioned having a massive loop in your code as a start, I think it makes it easier to go from nought to ten to sixty than just "learn how to use this tool!!!". The examples you gave for installing extensions were, again, really simple and reassuring. The takeaways were also things I consider very important to highlight, so that was wonderful. Basically flawless. Thank you!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Sep.2018)
The Devil in Our Data
I enjoyed this, it's a subject I'm fascinated by I loved how clear the slides are and the pop culture references, they were great for reinforcing your points. I would recommend projecting your voice more and paraphrasing the slides a bit more. Thank you! I'd love to see you give this talk to a wider audience, perhaps at Bath Digital Festival!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Sep.2018)
Squash Bugs with Static Analysis
Good topic, I enjoyed pinning down "what is a bug", you had some very instructive examples. I would have liked to unpack the statement "a static analysis tool should understand your vendor directory". I found that this was a great talk for PHP, coming from a TypeScript background some of the discussion around generics, packages and typehinting was a bit exhaustive. I liked the interactive/audience participation prompts! It was interesting learning how SARB works - I love learning about behind-the-scenes of handy features! You're good at paraphrasing from the slide, which keeps me engaged.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Oct.2018)
Email
Great subject!! Strong start. I love that you have examples of exactly how "solutions" could go wrong, and that you suggested good solutions, explained them thoroughly and flagged things to look out for. I can't think of improvements... Maybe pause for effect a bit more?
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Oct.2018)
Docker Container Disasters
Clear, readable slides, I liked the ones with big text and not just reading from them! Could have used bigger non-title text. Lol, perfect shirt for the occasion! Hugely informative! Good to have a heads up on some of the issues I could face. Some of the concepts I'm not very familiar with, so I really liked the topics you simplified.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Oct.2018)
The Horror of a Hash Complexity Attack
I don't know if the text was big enough for people at the back. Interesting subject, one I haven't really considered before! I liked your use of tone, body language and pace as you spoke, and that you engaged the audience with eye contact and questions. Live demo at a lightning talk?! Very daring!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Oct.2018)
Code, coffee and the bleedin obvious
Image game is strong! I loved the "Hello" into the phone - phone is a good use of props. Love the strong, relatable narrative. I liked the summary at the end, it was really effective as What Did Dev Learn. I think your talking flow will improve as you practice, it was very good, but I think it'll improve!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Oct.2018)
Night of the Legacy Code
Love the title. I like having an agenda, as it were, for the talk on the first slide. I like that you developed a subtle, intuitive shorthand to communicate with your Glamorous Assistant. This was full of really valuable information, and actionable advice, for external APIs as well as internal legacy code! I think you used concise, effective vice examples, which really reinforced what you were saying. The frequent summaries helped me keep track. There are some good apps to combine speaker notes and slide switching, shame about the mic. Really impressed overall!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Oct.2018)
Turning Coding Nightmares Into Coding Dreams
I love the fresh approach to the brief, especially given a professional interest in the other side of the fence, as it were. I admired the compassionate perspective that came across. The baby gif is effective but a bit distracting when you're talking, it might be good to have a slide after to wait on after presenting the gif. I was curious how the one true goal interacts with Agile, do you iterate on what success looks like with the client? I liked that you mentioned mental health day!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(10.Oct.2018)
Recruitment horror stories
Another fresh approach to the brief, I love it. Hilarious, relatable start! I think you really played to your audience. Ehem, next time take a screenshot of the search box, photos of screens don't come out well :) You spoke at a good volume! I like your use of narrative. You're a good public speaker. Also, as a recruiter at a code meetup talking about how much recruiters can suck... Ballsy. I like it. Thank you for being so nice about developers at the end, too.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(14.Nov.2018)
Progressive Web Apps: Reasons, Architectures, Strategies and Tools
"Google have Android" add an asterisk because of the new legislation... I enjoyed that you didn't just read from the slides, and that you supplemented the information on the slides when you did. Very engaging delivery. I LOVED learning about the history, the WHY of PWA. What's 'bounce rate'? Not everyone could see the logos, perhaps point out some prominent stats from your stats slides and then read out some of the brand's instead of reading almost all of one and none of the other. What's a PWA? A loooong list. Difference between strategies and architectures?? Where's the list from, your own analysis or sources? (Later: I get it, it's your plan. Please say "This is the breakdown I will go thru today" or something - it didn't feel like a title slide). Not everyone knows what a service worker is, thanks for explaining :) At capabilities I needed a pause to digest, or a cat picture. Perhaps introduce the slide before moving onto it. Umming and ahhing, not humming :) You mention web manifest in capabilities. All me about that. I need some images, between all the bullet points. I like the technical concepts you talk about during the architecture bit. Feels useful and helps cement the role of the architecture in my PWA. Would like to see an example of integrating the tools, or be told where it fits into my code. I feel like the tools bit could have been multiple slides. You keep using the word'progressive' and I'm not sure which definition you're using because I'm not sure whether you defined it initially explicitly word for word in the context of PWA. Interesting thoughts on so stores! Font in "from website to PWA" flow chart is unclear. Big it, bold it. Pause for effect on this slide. Move this slide to the end, move avoid slide one back.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.Nov.2018)
The Web API
In case my battery dies I thought I'd better tell you it was excellent.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(14.Nov.2018)
The Web API
Please change colours for browser support, it's v confusing. I think you spent over long on whether this talk is about Web API or security. Good pace of speaking, though, I think!! Please be more optimistic, I believed in your demos, you should, too :D I ducking loved the demo, really fun. I would kind of have liked to have seen the battery one, but you know... This all felt really interactive and I love that! Esp the penultimate demo.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Jan.2019)
Test to Break Principle
I love your subtitle. I'm interested to know what got you on CNN! I like the big text over big uncluttered images. I like the analogy of someone who actually tries to break physical cars. V relatable. I like calls for a round of applause, it's good to see audience engagement. I like the recognisable format of your test cases. I'm glad you gave the example of a good fail (airbags) and a bad fail (explodey killy) because I think many people would think that crash = fail and not think into failing gracefully. I thought that going through the different "facetious" test cases was a bit slow, but then your humorous summary made it perfect. I thought the line "I've done my job, I can go home now" was hilarious! A bug I had recently that was more unexpected to me and an easy mistake to overlook, was a numerical field that accepted any valid number... Including octals, hex and binary. Test to break caught that... Thanks for teaching me about assertSame! Thank you!! I love this subject and the truth is that test to break is really fun to do!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Jan.2019)
Let's get you geared up to tackle legacy code
A bunch of references [to British culture]... *waits for Mr Bean* I love the start [this isn't an indictment on the rest]. "That was an analogy." "Does anyone know who this company is?" My kind of humour. I found the layer of abstraction of your analogies still very relatable and accessible. Well done! I was sitting next to someone nontechnical who might not know what "legacy", "var_dump or "refactoring" means, but I think your talk clarified those well (and one would expect a technical audience, right?)! Great energy. Good use of facial expressions and body language. Not many people have the balls to say "move slow", I think they're worried that it'll get pushback because startup culture is cool. I like this advice. Thanks for covering what code climate and the other one are! People are often reticent to make broken commits, especially if they are used to squashing or trending their commits... It's an important thing to say, I wonder if you convinced the doubters? I think your description of driver/navigator wasn't clear enough, since people often make mistakes on this. I would have mentioned that when you use best practice in greenfield projects you're reducing technical debt for when your project becomes legacy/older. Is VSCode not a fully fledged IDE? (Never used it) I would make "watch your users/learn your usecases" its own slide. So many people never use their application and don't know how they're used! For the record, British audiences are like rows of mannequins, the only reason I know how to smile and whoop is because I'm half Mexican. So don't take it personally if people aren't jeering enough ;D Just have confidence and provide the expected noises yourself? Interesting view on microservices!! I do agree that it's a bit overwhelming to do ALL the things at once. I'm sorry this is so long (my feedback/commentary, not your talk). Good mention of SOLID principles, I would recommend doing the whole acronym and telling people to read up on them if they don't know them, because there are some junior developers in the audience who might not be familiar with them. I would throw in another easy analogy halfway through for a bit of a brain break, and a summary slide at the end!! Thank you!!! Good topic, excellently delivered. Apart from missing out Mr Bean! I liked your answer to the third question, it was very thoughtful.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(13.Feb.2019)
The Bots Are Taking Over: Developing Conversational Agents With ChatScript and PHP
Convivial start! This is fascinating. Explain the singularity to audience just in case. Would like subtitles. Hard to write, focusing on Mark Hamill. Is there a more human sounding voice, for my brain to parse? You can say the name of the rude language lol. Love the warnings! Good to see your local server. I like light mode bg for presenting. Would have liked more structure in learning how chstscript breaks down sentences and words - maybe even one demo, then a breakdown of the composite parts in slides? Fascinating. Your speak function is nice to read. Change TTS to Text To Speech in comments for onlookers. I don't know if you needed to cover sendMessage(). Man I could have a whole talk on capturing rules! Thank you so much.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Feb.2019)
Introduction to Serverless PHP
I really appreciate your visuals! You always have a great pace and variety of tone. Nice, clear slides. Not sure about narrating all the text on one of the early slides because it's quite a lot, but you transitioned out of narration v smoothly. I appreciate the comparison of PHP vs other languages for state! I like that you verbally have examples for the Sources in your concepts slide. I like the humour about missing command line vowels! You added good clarification to the OpenWhisk architecture diagram. I like your use of layterms. My attention span wanted a stretch at the beginning of the action container lifecycle slide. I'd appreciate a jolt or a brain break - a brief change of tonal pace or an attention catching slide - just before then. The move to AWS stuff kinda does that though? Really interesting gotchas on memory! Actually really good info on gotchas the whole way round. Thank you for breaking down the steps clearly. Really interested in decoupling for serverless, and things you should and shouldn't do, come back and give that talk. Excellent talk. PS: I know you don't always like people on their phones in talks, but I like to feedback live! Soz!

Events They'll Be At

No events so far

Events They Were At

© Joind.in 2019