Mark Dain

@ancarda

Talks

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Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
5 Features of a Good API
A great talk that was easy to follow and taught me a lot of things about HTTP and API design. Thank you for a fantastic talk!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
How to handle ?
Brilliant talk, thank you! My only suggestion would be perhaps mentioning some of the problems counting glyphs, e.g. mb_strlen("??") will result in 2 (at-least as of PHP 7). In Swift 4, however, this should result in 1 as I think it uses Unicode 9 rules. What's a good tactic for accurately counting characters when emojis are involved?
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
Connecting people - Identity in your platform
Brilliant talk, thank you - it was great! To expand on some other people's points about it feeling too Google orientated, I'd suggest pointing out more that navigator.credentials is a W3C standard - so mentioning Firefox & Edge more might help. Much of the magic happens through Chrome password syncing, but assuming Safari supported the standard, iCloud Keychain would play an important role; explaining that and helping people separate the two concepts (e.g. Firefox Sync also helps this to work) might be good too.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
Static Optimization of PHP Bytecode
Fantastic talk that gave a really good insight into the struggles of the PHP devs to optimize a complex language. I thought the pacing was good and the content was great. 5/5
Rating: 2 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
Ethical Engineering
The majority of the content was good but I have some real concerns over the message it gives towards the end. The first part of the talk covered ethical frameworks like absolute, relative, individualistic, etc... - this was fine, it's theoretical stuff taught in schools. The next part covered applying these frameworks on a classic ethical scenario; a runaway train that can go down track A or track B. One will kill a family of 3 and one will crash the train. This was great because it showed how neither framework is neatly applicable and *each problem must be tackled on a case-by-case basis*. Where the talk started to turn bad was towards the end, Christopher started trying to explore how technology could be used to solve social problems, such as putting microchips in guns. Technical solutions to social problems don't work because they aren't technology problems; they're social problems that require social solutions like improved handling of mental health, teaching conflict resolution skills in schools, and educating people on the value of life. I really think this example has to be worked on. My concern with smart guns is what happens when they're hacked? If something can be hacked, it will be hacked as we've seen with entertainment systems in cars. What if we could disarm police officers? What if the army also had smart guns and an invading force had regular guns? If that example was trying to highlight the growing issues with the recent IoT-all-the-things trend then I absolutely wish that were made much more clear.

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