Jelrik van Hal

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Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.Dec.2012)
Javascript Best Practices & BackboneJS for the PHP Developer
I still don't like Javascript, but I like your try. I think you got the right tips isolated, and I think you have found the right way to get these points across to PHP devs by mapping JS code to "what would this look like in PHP". Unfortunately, in my view, there was too much information in too little time. I couldn't follow everything like I would've wanted to.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(21.Dec.2012)
Cryptography For The Average Developer
Very, very clear talk on a topic which for me always has been a bit fuzzy. Got a lot of new information and you put a lot of the loose bits of information in my head in their respective places in the Big Picture®©™. Well paced, clearly meant for accessibility (as the title implied). You succeeded in meeting the expectations and even went beyond.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.Dec.2012)
From POX to HATEOAS, A Real Company’s Journey Building a RESTful API
As I'm working on quite a large API now, this was the talk I got the most out of in this PHP Masters volume. I liked hearing your thoughts on specific problems (the full resource body vs. 204 on creation, for example) to get my thought train running on our own work. For me, I had hoped for some extra depth and more detail, but a conference is no place for that, of course. Thanks!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(25.Jan.2013)
Git and GitHub: Level Up
Good introductory talk. I learned a thing or two, but I hoped for a bit more in-depth stuff. Ben did a very good job. He has found the right pace and, although he keeps telling us he's a bit scattered this morning and although he does some live bash'ing, his talk is well-structured and easy to follow.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(25.Jan.2013)
Silex Anatomy
The talk was missing the structure I hoped for. Kudo's for the live coding/configuring, but I didn't get the overview I would have liked.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.Jan.2013)
Algorithm, Review, Sorting
I didn't think anyone could get me to gain a basic understanding of sorting algorithms. Rowan did. Good voice, good pacing. In contrast with what he told us, he seems to have a very complete grasp of how his stuff works.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Mar.2013)
API Driven Development: Eating Your Own Dog Food
Actually, I was hoping for a bit more technical tips and tricks, but I can see why Alex' message needs to be told: eat your own dog food. You had a rich array of real life examples to convince the audience and you kept the right pace during your whole talk. Good job. Four star rating because I hoped for a different level.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(21.Mar.2013)
Post-conference social sponsored by Visualsoft at The Hood Street Club
Simple, but more than effective social. Four thumbs because of the loud music that, at times, made conversation difficult.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.Jul.2013)
Practical Software Estimation Techniques, or “How Late?”
Although estimating will never be just "Estimate excellently", I liked your cherry-pick way of finding the best things from all different parts of the development world to get the best way for you to estimate your projects. The whole set of tools you offered will help me be more strict about estimating (we all let down our guard one in a while, don't we?). Thanks for sharing.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(26.Jul.2013)
Source Code Management and Version Control
Good introductory talk on Git, but when I first saw the title, I hoped for a little more background and comparison on different VCS's. The talk itself was thorough, though. Four stars: the talk was excellent for what it was, but the the title and abstract didn't quite cover the content. By the way, I like your hat.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(26.Jul.2013)
How to Make Good Documentation a Regular Part of Your Day
I liked the minimalistic slides, it kept you focused on what Thursday was saying. What this talk could do with was a bit less surfacing goodness on how important it is to write documentation and a little bit more examples of different kinds of documentation and what inter-human purpose they serve, as well as documentation (text writing) styles that work and don't work for programmers.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Oct.2013)
0x0F Ways to be a Better Developer
As inspiring as keynotes come. Good kickoff, and kudos for the venue's tech staff for the split rooms.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Sep.2014)
Metrics and an application log: your new best friends
Very comprehensible and funny. Michael kicked in some open doors that need to be kicked in every now and then. I kind of hoped that you would be diving deeper in, but I can see that your target audience was a little bit different than the audience I expected!
Rating: 2 of 5 
(05.Sep.2014)
Decentralizing identity on the web by mixing OAuth and Bitcoin protocols
I had hoped this talk would dive into new and exciting authentication techniques, but unfortunately far more than half of the talk was dedicated to pointing out problems in current systems. Maybe you can try and incorporate some more solutions and remove some of the problems in your talk. The slides were a bit cluttered. The speaker did have a vast knowledge of the subject, though!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(06.Sep.2014)
Service Oriented Architecture for robust and scalable systems
I like your presentation style. Sure, you're all over the place and (over?)enthusiastic, but your slides keep us focused. I imagine they keep you focused as well. The contents of your talk gave a clear overview of the path you and your colleagues took and what you've learned.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Feb.2016)
How to effectively grow a development team
You presented us with some very, very comprehensive insights in building and facilitating your teams. Some of the information was already known to me, some of it was not. The absolute number one value of this presentation was the way you brought the pieces of information, the quotations from others, and your personal experience together in one flowing story. Furthermore, I liked your storytelling setup, for example your search for the meaning of "culture". You told us what path you took, what didn't work, and finally what you eventually ended up with. This helps me accept that I'm not the only one that doesn't have a clue what he's doing :D. I would like to point you to a few focus points for a possible next time. Firstly, you might want to cut down a bit in apologies for the stuff you tell being based on your own experience. Make it clear in the beginning that you're talking from experience, but do not apologise. Your experience is precisely what makes this talk useful. Secondly, you mentioned "kill all the meetings" and had to kind of chicken out of that later. Maybe you can try and figure out a statement on or definition for "meeting" that will make clear which meetings are valuable and which are not. I realise this can be a talk in it's own right, but it was a bit unclear to me what you meant. And thirdly, I would have appreciated a quick roundup of all the topics you covered. There were a LOT of them. Maybe you can mention all the "chapters" you will be going through at the beginning of the presentation and make the "cuts" between them during your presentation a bit more clear. A last small thing to work on: try and look your audience in the "eyes" more. Choose three or four people evenly scattered among the audience and look at them (or their foreheads; it makes me more comfortable not to actually look them in the eyes) from one to the other to give everyone the feeling of them being looked at. And to use the sandwich tactic, closing here with some positive feedback again: I think you had the right amount of jokes, and rightly timed as well. More in the beginning, to get people to "like" you and your delivery, and when it needs to be just a little less fun and games, you focus more on the actual content. I'd say: you did a very good job.

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