John Kary

@johnkary

Talks

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Rating: 4 of 5 
(10.Mar.2010)
PHP 5.3 == Awesome!
Solid talk with heavy emphasis on use of namespaces. Improvements with the most probable impact on your development are discussed first are nice. Wish there was a bit more talk on improvements with MySQLnd since MySQL is the most widely-used database with PHP.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Mar.2010)
Symfony Components: What's in for you?
Demo on Console was nice and in-depth. Lots of very helpful code examples too.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Mar.2010)
The Foundations of an Application Platform
A little jargon-heavy, even after asking who all had used OAuth before (very few.) Very code heavy with implementing features, but kind of useless when breezing through it and the audience doesn't know the API. At the end of the presentation, I got the impression I would be stepping into a world of pain if one of my clients asked for these social features.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Mar.2010)
PHP in the Enterprise
Good overview of touching on tools used to solve or troubleshoot certain problems encountered in enterprise development. Good balance between overview of concepts and their technical implementations.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Mar.2010)
Habits of Highly Scalable Web Applications
Great examples of how to scale in different areas and how exactly to do it. Well structured and easy to follow. Gives me a very good sense of where to start with scaling a site and how to build sites the first time with scaling in mind.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Mar.2010)
HTML5: Where Are We Now?
Very entertaining and well structured. Hit the highlights of HTML5 of what we can start using today.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(11.Mar.2010)
Caching with Memcached and APC
This talk lacked much of the underlying technical details of memcached and APC and failed to give much more than absolute beginner surface level examples of how to implement them, which even then you weren't sure on. Way too many "I think" and "I'm not sure" moments. Giving the "speed up" config options then not really being able to back them up with an adequate explanation of what exactly they do was kind of strange.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Mar.2010)
Streaming XML
As one of the noted who previously relied on SimpleXML, the examples given were great use cases for using XMLReader and XMLWriter. I'll reach for those tools the next time I'm dealing with large XML documents. The in-depth XML details were a bit much since I don't swim in XML all day, but could be beneficial for those who do.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Mar.2010)
Dependency Injection in PHP 5.2 and 5.3
Well structured as an intro to DI and why to use it, but the people who are not already using DI might not see the benefits of the DI container or be able to follow the code used to create it, which might turn them off to DI in general. When you asked if anyone had questions midway through the talk and no one raised their hand, I had the feeling nobody wanted to admit to not being able to follow it. A lot of people seemed to be stirring about, uncomfortable. You went through it a bit fast given the amount of code and complexity, and some of the code colors were hard to see. I had read the documentation and seen the slides before so I was able to follow, but I know the first time I saw this design pattern and the DI container it threw me for a loop.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Mar.2010)
Doctrine 2: Enterprise Persistence Layer for PHP
Great examples of how Doctrine 2 is the evolution of Doctrine 1 and how things have changed and why that's a good thing.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(12.Mar.2010)
Getting Started with PHPUnit
I was disappointed this talk didn't go deeper with how to test more complex examples. Maybe more complex examples on how to take hard to test code and make it testable since I bet that's how a lot of people would come into testing.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Mar.2010)
AntiPHPatterns
This talk alone was worth the price of admission.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2010)
Open Source Your Career
Lorna breaks down most of the reasons you might try to talk yourself out of getting involved in an open-source project. This is a very inspiring talk for anyone looking to push their personal boundaries, especially outside of your day job.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Nov.2010)
So You Want to be an Architect
Excellent talk by a seasoned speaker. So many great quotes. Does an amazing job of covering the history, theory and pragmatic steps of being a software architect. I will be referencing this talk again, and can't wait to get a recording of it to re-watch and take in some things I missed. There is so much info here, it's hard to digest in the first listen. EVERY career developer should hear this talk, if only to give you an idea of what this role does and one option for your career path.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(06.Nov.2010)
Technical Writing
The talk is as advertised, but felt a bit elementary. If the audience has taken a college-level writing class, they might not hear too much new information. I would have liked it more if each bullet point was given with more emphasis on how it can be applied specifically to technical writing, not just writing in general. The talk is titled "Technical Writing," which seems a bit vague. Something more explicit and descriptive might be "English 101 For Technical Writers." The "cubing" strategy was great, and was new to me. It would make an excellent pragmatic example to list the steps in the concept, then take a mock idea for a blog post and talk about how to break it down using this technique.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(07.Nov.2010)
Rocking Your Resume
Excellent, no-nonsense talk about the reality of hiring technical people. Great examples of what to use and what NOT to use in your resume. Eye-opening look into the world of high-volume resume processing.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(24.May.2011)
Mobile for PHP Developers
Great overview of a lot of resources a developer should be concerned with when targeting mobile. 75% of this talk could have been given to a developer that doesn't know PHP and it would have still been worthwhile. I did feel you spent too much time on the "Signed URLs" portion. A shared secret is a pretty basic security concept that many people have probably seen before if they know how to prevent CSRF. I would suggest removing the advocating for adding a timestamp to the secret because it is very common for server/client to have out of sync clocks. Not to mention added latency for unreliable cell networks. Yes, like you said, you could compensate for drifting clocks, but I don't think the logic to compare them adds equal benefit.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(24.May.2011)
NoSQL: Why, How and When
It's obvious you know a lot about CouchDB and have hacked with it a lot, but I don't think you were able to communicate that in a way that was accessible to most of the audience. At the start of the talk you asked if anyone was using a variation of NoSQL databases in their apps. Of the 30-some people in the room, only a few raised their hands. The latter part of the talk was you showing us stuff with Futon2, which seemed cool, but I don't think many of us know exactly what was going on half the time. Maybe it was just me, but it was hard to follow. The code samples you displayed about using PHP to insert and get images was useful, and I would have liked to have seen more examples of code usage, or additional use cases for when CouchDB is a good choice. Overall, the first part of the talk about the history of NoSQL and the differences between all the different types of NoSQL databases had good structure. But once we got to the second half of installing CouchDB, resty and Sag, it turned into more steam of consciousness and a demo of Futon2, which didn't really involve the audience doing anything with what we just installed.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.May.2011)
First Class APIs
This is a talk and concept every modern dev needs to hear. The graphs are great to show people how they are doing it wrong and how to do it "right"
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.May.2011)
PHP Development in the Cloud
For those looking for an introduction to cloud computing it's great. The pictures showing what parts were included in the IaaS and PaaS are great visualizations. The only thing I would suggest, as others have before me, is how to mitigate downtime of the cloud.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(25.May.2011)
Test Driven Development Live!
I don't feel this talk serves the modern developer well other than a quick introduction to what Unit Testing and Test Driven Development are. The library used to demonstrate writing tests is SimpleTest, which is often considered legacy compared to PHPUnit. It might be more useful to demonstrate with PHPUnit, although both libraries at the basic level are very similar. Jason did add a disclaimer that he has contributed to SimpleTest. Writing tests can seem tedious, but I don't think live-coding the examples, and not being able to code them quickly, kills any type of rhythm to the talk. Code could be prepared before the talk and still communicate the same ideas. Use the time saved to advocate best practices of how to best do TDD as testing strategies are shown.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(25.May.2011)
Securing Your API
Lots of info to get through in 45 minutes, so kudos for that. You gave a lot of good info on tips and caveats about each security implementation. Given the time slot and the different technologies to cover, I think this is a great talk. If you had more time, it would be cool to see PHP code wrappers for some of those security implementations, just to show how difficult or simple they could be.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.May.2011)
PHP go VROOM
Tons of info to cover in the time slot. Good order for info going from low hanging fruit that everyone can tune, all the way to the high-level infrastructure. Great!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.May.2011)
Frontend Caching — The New Frontier
Lots of info to get through in 1 hour, and this would be a great intro to frontend optimization. Lots of places to start looking if you're not already. Thanks!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.May.2011)
Think Like an Ant, Distribute the Workload.
Excellent talk with tons of info about workload distribution and scaling an architecture. Well delivered and structured!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(26.May.2011)
Designing Beautiful Software
Your example on refactoring the simple act of sending mail to an extensible and testable implementation is spot on. Sending mail is probably something every PHP dev has done in their career. And if not, it's still easily accessible. The talk structure is well done, but needs a call to action at the end. You could benefit your listeners by suggesting some resources on how they can start to recognize these structures in their own code and start applying these principles. Recommend some books and concepts people can check out to learn more on their own. This is a talk I would love to see at every conference, and we need more like this!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.May.2011)
In the Shadow of the Ninja: Biding Your Time While You Plot Your Coup
Very insightful information to pass on to junior and mid-level developers. Getting better with delivery comes with experience. Remember that when you look up, instead of down, your voice will project easier and you will be able to be heard. Speak from the chest, not the throat. It was hard to figure out when you were switching gears to the next question. If you add inflection, or a quick pause between topics, it allows the audience to switch gears. A new slide at that time is also a good idea. Great job for your first time speaking at a big conference!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.May.2011)
Teaching Your Machine to Find Fraudsters
This is a very rich talk with a lot of potential. Give a definition of Fraud up front, and the different types of fraud you're attempting to mitigate during your talk. Right now this is in the middle of your talk. Move all the fraud types to the front, then the progress through that list and show how to mitigate each one. This will give the audience a roadmap for what you're going to talk about, and if they're not familiar with the problem domain, it can help bring them in. The click fraud stuff is awesome, and you could probably do a talk on that alone, but it's very dense with code and math. The code itself is hard to follow as you're talking about it. Some of this was due to code formatting and variable naming, but I understand you're trying to condense it to fit on the slide. This might be better abstracted across several slides as simple math equations, instead of code, and displayed in the same order as your code uses. Some of my feedback may be due to my own unfamiliarity with the problem domain, so keep that in mind too :) Great delivery!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.May.2011)
Teach A Man To Fish: Coaching Development Teams
Great structure of how to improve team development and well delivered!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Feb.2012)
Training: Diving into Symfony2 Advanced Features
Hugo is a boss! He did an amazing job delivering a very insightful and in-depth overview of some of Symfony2's more advanced features. His pacing is perfect for those following along, and he had an answer for all questions from the attendees. He live-coded most of the code we trained on, which is hard to do accurately in any setting--let alone over 2 days using a complex codebase like Symfony. If Hugo is giving a training in your area, do not hesitate to sign up!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Feb.2012)
Building Your Software Development A-Team
Great enthusiastic talk with accurate analogies!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Feb.2012)
TDD and Getting Paid
Only caught the tail-end of the talk, but I especially liked the "Be prepared to fail" aspect, and giving points on how to cut your losses when things do go wrong. You're right to turn people to the Ruby community for how to grow software with TDD.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Feb.2012)
Realtime Web Apps with WebSockets
Nice job showing some actually working examples. It felt like the whole room finally "got it" once you showed the blog example. It was interesting when you started a tangent about not writing web apps in node.js. The whole room kind of held their breath hinging on your next few words to see what you'd say. Many PHP devs I've talked to feel threatened by the resurgence of JavaScript because it feels so different to what they're used to with PHP. That tangent might make a nice permanent addition to your talk when tailoring it for PHP developers.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Mar.2012)
Symfony2 by code
Good mix of high-level and low-level concepts for Symfony2.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Mar.2012)
Living with Legacy Code
Great delivery and strategies. More devs need to know how to work this way.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Mar.2012)
HTML5 as a game console
3D Mariooooooo!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Mar.2012)
Make your project SOLID!
Great examples! Felt the pacing was perfect given the allocated time. Based on other feedback here, some may be expecting to feel further along than they are. You might consider adding a more high-level disclaimer about learning and coding using SOLID principles can take a lot of time to figure out so those seeing the concepts for the first time won't feel bad if they don't click right away.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Mar.2012)
Virtualize your Development
Sorry, claiming my comment above :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(03.Mar.2012)
Varnish, the easy way to speed up your websites
One of the most useful talks I heard during the whole conference. Covered all the major points with the right amount of depth. Absolutely love the diagrams on how HTTP requests leave and return to the browser (my second time seeing this part of the presentation). It's probably the best visual representation I've seen on the subject matter. This was my first real look at the internals of Varnish, so the subroutine control flow diagrams were a huge help. It really helped me understand pass and miss. Every developer should hear this presentation!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Sep.2012)
Keynote
I really like how you tied in your early experience with a computer to the modern complexity of software development. The segway into introducing SensioLabs Desktop was perfect.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(27.Sep.2012)
What mom never told you about Bundle configurations
Very good info about config validation. The end of your talk goes into how to properly decouple your services from the container. Some developers may be doing this, some already decouple their services, while others may not know what you're talking about. I think your talk would benefit from showing an example of a tightly coupled service to the container, then how you progress through refactoring it out. It might take 10 minutes to walk through it, and why it's bad, but could really round out the talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Sep.2012)
Symfony2 meets Drupal 8
Cool to see what Drupal contributions have been pushed back. Thanks, Larry, for all the hard work you're putting into making this collaboration happen!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(27.Sep.2012)
Leveraging the Serializer Component
Good speed and overview of intro to this powerful component. Not the sexiest functionality on the surface, but super powerful.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Sep.2012)
Designing HTTP Interfaces and RESTful Web Services
Second time seeing this talk (first was Confoo) and it's even better the second time. True mastery of the material. Please continue submitting this talk to conference CFP's.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Sep.2012)
JEOPARDY
This was a total blast. The audience loved it and it looked like the participants did too.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Sep.2012)
Coktail party
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Sep.2012)
Silex: From Micro to Full Stack
You went pretty fast, but I think that's OK because there is so much to cover. You did a great job of showing many of the ways Silex can be extended to do almost anything, even a simple Backbone.js app. Nice caveats for when to reevaluate using Silex and maybe jump to a full-stack framework.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Sep.2012)
Being a Good OSS Contributor
Very insightful, refreshing and motivational. Really solid for being your first time giving the talk. I like that you touched on a ton of different ways people can contribute to open-source code, which aren't always the obvious ones like writing code. Everyone should feel like they can contribute something to their favorite project after listening to this. Also good insights into some of the development/contribution culture surrounding Symfony2. The clone pictures of Lukas, Stof, Ryan and Fabien were hilarious!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Sep.2012)
Symfony2 Form Tricks
The Model -> Normalized -> View diagram was beyond helpful. If that's not already in the docs it might help many others. Thank you so much for this.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(29.Sep.2012)
The Wonderful World of the Symfony Components and Composer
I really liked your enthusiasm! Everyone here is already convinced to use Symfony components, but take this talk on the conference circuit and you will win hearts and minds. Preach it, brother!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Feb.2013)
PHP Jeopardy (Happy Hour)
Jeopardy is always hilarious. The questions always make me laugh, and the others are educational. I wonder if you open-sourced the code if the community could help fix any of the crash issues, or improve it in some way. Maybe to find a solution for the buzzer functionality... like allow people to connect to the game via a browser/app and buzz in that way. But the crowd picking the person who raised their hand first adds a bit to the fun and involvement factor.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Feb.2013)
Building OpenSky with Symfony2
Great presentation and delivery! Well paced and you did well to explain how each piece fit together. Not as many people are willing to talk about their architecture like this, so props to you and OpenSky for being willing to share. Like some others have said, the code examples could benefit from changing to use a light background and dark text. Dark color scheme seems to work OK when showing only a few lines, but the larger examples are harder to see.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Feb.2013)
Introducing Tests in Legacy PHP Applications
Great info for a topic all developers will encounter in their career. I liked that you cited a book to give people a place to reference beyond your presentation. Like some questions that came up at the end, perhaps explain more about the technologies under Behat and other options for doing end-to-end tests. While Behat is a great tool and you use it at your company, it's probably not likely that devs attending the talk will have used it, and maybe not even heard of it or the concept of BDD, Gherkin, etc. Maybe find a tool that's more accessible for devs so they could feel more confident in tackling the daunting task of starting to test their applications without having to build up all their knowledge with everything surrounding Behat.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Feb.2013)
!Normal===Awesome!
This is a great talk and is very inspiring! The stories you tell of prominent members of the community rising to become giants in their niche are very relatable. When talking about those people I'd love you to show pictures of them on their respective slides. I'm sure some in the room recognize these people by name, but seeing their photo may trigger, "Oh, I've seen them before!" type of moment. I heard a few attendees afterward asking around for contact info for some of the people you talked about. Perhaps you could also add their public contact info (Twitter, IRC handle, etc) with their consent.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Feb.2013)
Dream, Experiment, Create, and Share
The "Turkey Proof" concept was new to me and was especially insightful. A great reminder that consequences of our work can go far beyond 1's and 0's.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Feb.2013)
Twig Tips and Tricks
Great content, even if some of the advice is abusing Twig and doing too much work in the View layer. I'm glad you prefaced those sections with CAUTION statements. As others said, pacing was a bit fast for how advanced the talk was, but will be easy to review with slides.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Feb.2013)
DOs and DON’Ts of MongoDB
I'm only slightly familiar with MongoDB, but I took away some advice great for relational databases too. The ideas on denormalization are great and worth noting for many normalized-obsesssed developers. I was able to take some good notes and bookmark some ideas for if/when I use MongoDB in the future. Your delivery style is great and continually engaging. I was never bored.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Feb.2013)
How Kris Writes Symfony Apps
Thanks so much for taking the time to put together this presentation. It affirmed many architecture decisions I've made in past applications but also taught me a few things. I picked up a few tips on Assetic like whitelisting scanned bundles and that Twig's path() can accept a directory. I love the idea and visuals for the layering concepts. More devs need to hear about that concept. I think the talk's content could be split into two separate presentations. First the Symfony architecture side of things (mostly the first part of your talk with various tips and some of the Event stuff) and second doing a talk specifically geared towards modeling domain code, the layers concepts, how to leverage various Doctrine listeners for specific purposes and expand on all of that with more code examples. And total bonus points for giving away shirts! :)
Rating: 5 of 5 
(20.Dec.2013)
Guiding Object-Oriented Design with Tests
I really liked this talk, not only for its content but because your delivery felt very polished and informed. You weren't at the edge of your knowledge and grasping at how to explain the concepts you were advocating. My only suggestion is to either embrace or cut the SOLID principles in this talk. The rest of my current team, while familiar with some of the concepts around testing, hadn't heard of SOLID before. (I'm still building up their base knowledge rather than throw more rules at them.) So your slide with just "SOLID" on it and you reciting the acronym principles felt a bit overwhelming for them. Especially having it early in the talk and then the rest of the talk didn't really mention them. It felt like you flexing a bit of muscle to acronym-drop that you were "in the know" wink wink nudge nudge to anyone else already on the TDD train. Yes, the principles are important, but I'm not convinced they're any benefit other than a passing mention, "If you've heard of the SOLID principles some of what we'll talk about will be familiar. If not, no problem, just pay attention to how our code examples evolve." You can certainly advocate for them more at the end by referring to a book that outlines them well for those interesting in learning to think about writing well factored code. I loved the code examples, they were perfectly succinct yet complex enough to be grasped on slides. Your evolution of the code and showing the TDD cycle was perfectly paced and well explained. For a topic that can easily come across as dry and boring you nailed it.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.Jan.2015)
Build Promotion with Jenkins
CI can often feel like the boring plumbing that keeps your team going, but Kevin's personal experience building up CI for his team really shown through. His anecdotes were personal and engaging, which can be easy to gloss over in an infrastructure talk. I love that he was able to show during the presentation how a new commit flowed through the build stages and made it to production. Kevin also fielded questions with ease and was able to answer every question asked.
Rating: 0 of 5 
(14.Jan.2015)
The FizzBuzz kata with test-driven design
5/5 stars. I somehow submitted this without providing a rating, and editing the post doesn't let me change my rating. Eric structured this talk very well. He introduced Composer and how to use it to install PHPUnit. This alone would be insightful for anyone wanting to get deeper into modern PHP. Eric really shined during the ping-pong TDD portion of the talk. His pacing was likely slow enough for a beginner and fast enough for someone familiar with writing tests. Eric carried a very friendly and approachable demeanor throughout his talk and interacted well with the audience when asking for how the audience through to proceed. It felt personal and safe. My only suggestions would be to polish the delivery of the Composer portion. A little bit of futzing around getting autoloading setup and digging into composer.json could lose someone not familiar with it. I also would like to have heard more about the *why* behind TDD and what it affords the developer. Thinking about the various comfort levels an audience member might have, what one thing would you like each level to walk away with? How to think about something? How to do something specific?
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Apr.2015)
Modern Debugging Strategies (or, what to do when your code plays tricks on you)
Dan did a fantastic job covering the full range of day-to-day debugging options for developers. I really like how he started simple with echo/var_dump and made it to XDebug for step debugging. I even learned about a few new libraries that don't require a framework. The only thing he could have touched on was debugging PHP itself when it crashes. Seriously, everything else was covered!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(01.Aug.2015)
Three Design Patterns That Will Make You a Better Programmer
Joseph, you did a great job delivering this talk and obviously put a lot of work into it. The effort to do a custom-created slide deck was evidence of the forethought you had. I especially liked the diagrams which helped me visualize the patterns. I liked that the talk included some examples of writing testing. We can always benefit from more testing awareness! But it felt out of place. If I heard you correctly this was your first time writing tests. While that's fantastic and you should do more of that, I would suggest leaving the test code in the repository and not in slides unless the talk is specifically about testing. Not because you did it poorly but rather it likely went over the heads of your target audience. I remember how I felt looking at patterns for the first time... trying to wrap my head around objects and growing accustomed to PHP's object syntax. When I first started learning patterns it would take me several minutes to even read and understand a single page of code. By throwing testing into the mix I felt I was in cognitive overload. That said, your presentation style and desire to push yourself will continue to serve you well. I look forward to seeing you talk more about what has been interesting you at future KC PHP meetups!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2016)
How to Cope When It All Hits the Fan
So calm, cool and collected, I loved this talk. Great points about how having a checklist and a plan will save us from ourselves!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2016)
HTTP is Dead. Long Live HTTP/2!
So much great content packed into this talk! There's a lot of history behind the HTTP spec but I would've traded 5 minutes of HTTP/1 spec history for what else is new in HTTP/2.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2016)
Terrible Ideas in Git
I liked the delivery and humor in this talk. The tips for PS1 changes were great!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2016)
Exploiting the Brain for Fun & Profit
My faaaaavorite talk of the conference! There's so much great advice for improving one's lifestyle that leads to enabling them as a better programmer and human. Keeping people engaged by making them physically interact was brilliant--it worked incredibly well for me and I didn't see anyone NOT engaged. You dealt well with audience members wanting to share their own ideas! I've seen other speakers crash and burn and lose control of the room but you let them talk and moved on. Very well done!
Rating: 2 of 5 
(09.Apr.2016)
The Origin of HyperCard in the Breakdown of the Bicycle for the Mind
I love abstract talks like this but I had trouble plugging into this one. There were many great one-liners worth contemplating but the speed they were spoken made it hard to let them sink in. Could you slow down and focus your delivery on less points with more supporting details? Excellent slides/visual presentation! I hope you can refine the delivery to the caliber of the slides.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(02.Jun.2016)
Generators - not just for keeping the lights on
This was an excellent topic for user-group discussion and presentation! The code examples were really, really good to illustrate the concepts and I came away better knowing what generators are and how I might use them. Your example showing the CPU/memory usage differences really drove home for me that generators are a good solution if I have a large results set and am willing to trade memory footprint for CPU time. I liked seeing the output from the command-line and feeling the pain of waiting a long time for the 1,000,000 iteration count to process, but seeing the low memory footprint somehow felt like we won a game of code golf. If you gave this talk again to a wider audience, I would've liked a graphic at the end of that CPU/memory segment that plots the CPU and memory usage with each iteration. It would give a more visual sense how much the CPU/memory changed with each iteration. You covered a lot of ground in a short amount of time... so short of time I had trouble wrapping my head around most of the code examples before you were breezing onto the next slide with even more code. Slow waaaaaay, way down when code is on the screen. This goes especially for the entire first part of your talk, even when talking about basic concepts like a for() loop. It was hard to pay attention to what you were saying and trying to comprehend what the code was doing. Perhaps pause for 15-30 seconds when new code comes on the screen, or speak really slowly about the idea you're conveying, so the audience has time to read it. This silence can feels awkward as a speaker but you'll keep your audience in the loop. The last thing you want is people mentally checking out because they couldn't see your point or worse end up feeling inadequate in their abilities when they can't keep up. Keep in mind you the speaker are very familiar with the code example because you wrote it. (I even know you wrote most of it last night so it's really fresh for you!) Your audience will almost always be less experienced than you in reading code. They will take longer to read and comprehend it. If you think you're moving too slow, you aren't. This is an advanced topic and needs easing into it no matter the experience level. If you're looking to do more speaking I think with a bit more digging into details and slowing down you could turn this into a talk that could be accepted to some larger conferences! Thanks for all your time and effort!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Jun.2016)
Last Month in PHP
Eric always speaks enthusiastically when summarizing the important happenings in the PHP world over the last month. He comes across accessible and approachable. His calm and collected demeanor somehow hides his giddiness for the subject which is obviously a labor of love. I look forward to this presentation each month! I'm even more impressed with this month's delivery as I learned later Eric was not feeling well. I never would have guessed from his passionate delivery!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Sep.2016)
Last (2) Month(s) in PHP
Eric covered a lot of ground in a short amount of time! My favorite part was the overview of RFC's and new features coming to PHP 7.1. I don't follow new development that closely and I'm very thankful someone like Eric, whose obvious passion for covering this subject, can put together a high-level overview to share!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Sep.2016)
Using CloudFormation Templates for AWS
Joseph did a good job covering a AWS and how to configure it. The most valuable part was likely the starter code he offered on his GitHub account. I liked seeing the different options in the JSON file and that it had a visual editor and his opinions on it, however it did feel a little dry, mostly focused on exactly what each section did rather than his expertise from extensively using the service. Talking about benefits of "the cloud" to a room of developers felt too basic and I'd suggest cutting it for future versions. Thank you for your effort to talk about an otherwise complex topic!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(06.Jan.2017)
Last Month in PHP - December 2016
Eric was well prepared for this talk and enthusiastically overviewed the latest happenings in the PHP community. A core strength of this talk is how Eric keeps tabs on the latest PHP RFC's and features coming to new versions of the language. If he could improve in any way it would be to spend more time delving into the new language features, and less time on numerous patch releases from various frameworks.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(08.Jun.2017)
Building a Podcasting Platform with Grav
Andrew put in a lot of work for this talk to cover an introduction to flat-file CMS vs database CMS and where Grav has its strengths compared to other CMS's. The technology behind Grav could be a talk in itself, but Andrew took us much deeper seamlessly weaving together an actual project he launched integrating Twig template engine to output both a website and XML podcast feed. It's obvious Andrew was sharing a passion of his accompanied by deep technical knowledge making this talk accessible and entertaining to all skill levels. This talk would be right at home at any conference! Very well done.

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