Dave Liddament

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Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.Oct.2016)
Deploying PHP 7
Great talk, very interesting.
Rating: 2 of 5 
(31.Oct.2016)
The Secret Life of APIs
Delivery wasn't great, possibly hindered by microphone. I'm not sure if the mic wasn't working or whether the speaker was too far from it. Either way it has hard to hear from the back. Next time maybe quick mic check and then stay close to it. Perhaps, as others have commented, focus on a few areas rather than trying to approach all areas of API development.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.Oct.2016)
Beyond Testing
Great talk. Lots of useful bits of information that I'll certainly be taking into my work.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.Oct.2016)
The Road to Continuous Deployment
Great talk. Very useful advice for database migrations - when I've seen other talks on CD they've glossed over or hidden from this topic.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(31.Oct.2016)
The API Toolbox
So many useful tools and tips. Thanks for a good talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.Oct.2016)
CQRS & EventSourcing in the Wild
Very interesting talk. It provided a far more balanced view of benefits and pain points using CQRS than other talks I've seen on the subject. Also a big thanks for the mini tutorial and examples at the bar afterwards!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.Oct.2016)
Conscious Coupling
Excellent talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2017)
Beyond PSR-7: Design Your Own Middleware Using The Instruction Bus
Great talk. I'll definitely move a pipeline implemented using Symfony events to an instruction bus - much simpler. Thanks for answering all my questions after the talk too.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2017)
What's in a name?
Great talk. Every developer should see it. Lot of good advice.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2017)
Protect your API with OAuth2
A clear introduction to OAuth 2. Well worth watching for those who want a good introduction to the topic.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Apr.2017)
Flipping Out with Feature Flags and Toggles
Good introduction to the topic and nice to see some Symfony examples to show how easy it would be to implement.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(09.Apr.2017)
Expect the un-expected: How to handle errors gracefully
Lots of useful information. Good to see tools that will help with monitoring and logging.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(09.Apr.2017)
“Writing code that lasts” … or writing code you won’t hate tomorrow.
Great talk. Lots of good take away points that I can apply immediately. Really good illustration of how to remove else statements to make code more readable. Maybe next time spend less to on the why and more time on the how.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
Closing speech & prize draw
I did win an elephant, so 5 stars from me!
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
Introduction to functional programming with Phunkie
A good talk. I didn't quite grasp the grid game example at first. Maybe a little more time explaining that would have helped?
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
Static Optimization of PHP Bytecode
A great talk. It's really interesting to learn a bit more about what goes on under the hood and the kinds of testing and research that goes on. Every conference should have some kind of internals talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
Managing dependencies is more than running "composer update"
Good to mention the risks and how to manage them. Some developers are all too keen to require a package without checking how actively it's developed, what license (if any it has), etc.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
What's New in Xdebug?
Good talk, nice to see new features.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
Don’t believe everything you learn
Entertaining, a great lightning talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
My Favourite PhpStorm Surprises
Great talk. I'm sure you could dedicate an entire conference track to PHPStorm, and it'd be so useful. Some nice tips. I didn't take enough notes so hoping the video will be on youtube soon.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
5 Features of a Good API
Great talk. Lots of useful take aways, I might have to tweak a few APIs when I'm back in the office.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
How to handle ?
Great talk. Entertaining and useful.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Jun.2017)
RegEx Is Your Friend
Good talk. Despite using regex for a while I still picked up a few useful tips.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(13.Jul.2017)
Graphs are Everywhere
Great talk. Well paced. Well delivered. Informative and interesting. It helped my a few concepts I'd not really grasped before. My only minor suggestion for improvement would be to drop most of the text from the slides.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(13.Jul.2017)
Living With Legacy
Good talk with some useful points and reminders: - Developers generally always want revolution, but often evolution is better and safer (but also less fun!). - Also good to remind everyone that it's not just about the tech. The business case, and critically money, has to be there. I think slides were good too. Nice to see minimal text on slides. Perhaps to improve add a bit more structure. E.g. at the start a high level overview of that talk and at the end a summary with, say 3, of the main take aways? Also move the bit about decoupling from framework to main talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(01.Oct.2017)
PHP in 2017
Great talk. Really interested to learn about the early days and how PHP came about. Interesting to learn about PHP7.2 and beyond, especially the optimisations. Also definitely going to look at phan.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(02.Oct.2017)
Storing Non-Scalar Data
I've not ventured too far into the world of noSQL data stores, so it was interesting to get an overview of them and to get an idea of where they might be useful. The only thing I would suggest changing is the abstract. I think the amount of material, the pace of the talk and depth was right for the length of talk. I don't see how any more could have successfully been added. However judging by some of the feedback you received, people seem to expect more. Perhaps add something like "high level overview of various noSQL solutions" or words to that effect. Just to make sure attendees' expectations are aligned with what's possible in a 45min talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2017)
Nuclear powered software security
Interesting to learn about nuclear meltdowns how the how analysis to mitigate the risks and reduce the impact of such disasters can be applied to software. I'm also impressed that despite requiring a full computer reboot the talk went on smoothly.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(02.Oct.2017)
Async requests and reactive responses with php-fpm
Interesting talk. I'll definitely have a look at the library.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(02.Oct.2017)
Symfony Flex 101
Nice intro to symfony flex. Entertaining speaker. Suggestions for improvements: - Take the risk out of the live demos by recording screencasts of the demo and just playing back the video. - Pull out the commands of interest and show them bigger on a slide. Sometimes it was hard to read the text on the screen.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2017)
The GDPR is coming, are you ready?
Great talk. Every conference from now till May 2018 (and probably beyond!) needs a talk like this. Speaker was confident and made what could be a dull topic entertaining. He also handled the Q&A session at the end well, especially from those who seemed to want to shoot the messenger.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2017)
12 tried and tested top tips for better testing
Good talk. Amo did a great job of engaging the audience, no mean feat after Saturday night's entertainment. I liked the fact that there were takeways that could be applied immediately. I learned a few more PHPStorm tips (always good) and also liked the HTML report for tests. Some good Q&A at the end too.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2017)
Microservices vs The Distributed Monolith
Nice introduction to the topic. Plenty to think about and take away.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(02.Oct.2017)
The Creative Developer
Well delivered. Interesting points. I'll certainly change how I frame conversations about time taken for certain tasks.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(04.Nov.2017)
Rise of the Machines
A good talk, this lots of interesting bits. It felt like it was just warming up towards the end. To improve: I'd have rather had fewer anecdotes and a quicker introduction and spend more time on the content towards the end.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(28.Jan.2018)
Beyond REST maturity levels: Insights from building a real life, high-load REST API
There were some really useful bits of information. Although at times it was a bit hard to follow. To improve I'd recommend adding a bit more structure and clearer learning goals.... E.g. In this section we're going to solve problem X. Here is solution to problem X.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jan.2018)
Learning Machine Learning
Great talk. Nice introduction the the topics. Delivered in an engaging manner with a lots of humour.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jan.2018)
Aiming for Autonomous Services
I've been wanting to see Matthias talk for many years. So I was really excited to get the opportunity. Content was good and well delivered. Slides were excellent. Unfortunately the prepared content only filled half the slot. If it has stretched to 40mins+ I'd have rated this 5 stars. However the slides finished after the 30min mark. Whilst audience input is interesting I'd far listen to prepared material from the expert.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(28.Jan.2018)
How PHP ticks
Very interesting talk. It's great to learn more about what happens behind the scenes.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(28.Jan.2018)
Technically DDD
Really excellent talk. Good content. Good slides. Excellent delivery. Nice take aways that people can start using right away. However it was too short. Approx half of the allotted time. Another 15mins of material and this would be a 5 star talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Apr.2018)
Good or bad? - telling the difference is hard.
Great talk. Lots of interesting points about who we don't think about cost very well (e.g. £100 expense claim vs 8 people in a 1 hour meeting). To improve: I'd work on a stronger ending. Really push through the take-aways that we can apply to the next day in work.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Apr.2018)
Crafting Quality PHP Applications: an overview
A great talk about all areas of code quality. Lots of useful bits. To improve: I'd like to see references to stats that give the business case for doing things like testing / code review that you can take to non developers / managers. As developers we shouldn't spend days improving performance of code without first getting a baseline to use as a reference to see if we've actually improved things. It is a reasonable question for a manager to ask what the cost benefit analysis of activities like code review and testing are.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Apr.2018)
Static Site Generators, PHP, and The Cuban Revolution
Great talk. Entertaining and well delivered. I liked the analysis of the pros and then a few slides later how they were cons. Also loved the link back to how this is what happened in the 90s. I'd love to see a full length version of this talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Apr.2018)
How to not be a cool developer
Great talk. Clear slides. I loved the premise. To help with explaining the code bits you could have a slides that but a border around the section of code you're talking about (or highlight it in some other way).
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Apr.2018)
Speedy Seeding for Load Testing
Good talk, well delivered As an organiser I always get a bit worried when a live demo starts, however Martin's was well prepared and worked really well. To improve: Maybe a quick explanation as to how the Bulk Loader speeded things up.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Apr.2018)
Using a framework or not
Good slides. Good delivery. Good content. A few minor points for improvement: A massive con for writing your own framework was missing: security. The major frameworks will have been reviewed for security problems and vulnerabilities by many people. Rolling your own it's just you. (Admittedly mistakes still happen e.g. recent Drupal bug). Also for non trivial projects the business logic should be decoupled from the framework. Once you've decoupled code from framework the choice of framework (or not) becomes less of an issue. I feel this is not emphasised enough in the industry generally. Talks about frameworks should, IMHO, at least mention this in passing.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(12.Apr.2018)
Bad Tech Tests
Good talk. I liked the delivery. Something a little different that worked really well for a lightning talk. As others have mentioned maybe a different picture for each story. I'd have also liked a quick summary at the end too. Just a 1 liner from each story to remind everyone of the valuable take aways. Great job.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Apr.2018)
Not using the Git Command Line
Great talk. Well delivered. Lots of valid points about things I've not really thought about (e.g. what times are people making commits, are they working all night, etc). I think you might have convinced a CLI dinosaur like me to look into source tree! My only tip for improvement is to slim down the talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(12.Apr.2018)
Devkit. By the People, For the People.
Every project would benefit from the concept. Lots of good suggestions. E.g. write your tools in the same language you're working with. To improve... I think this was a full length talk. For lighting talk I would have kept to talking about the principles and left out the actual implementation as you didn't have time to do it justice. It would make a great full length talk and we'd love you to present it at PHPSW sometime!
Rating: 5 of 5 
(31.May.2018)
I Community and So Can You
Interesting and entertaining talk. Some useful take aways. A great start to the conference.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Jun.2018)
Is It Too Late to Learn How to Program? How Being a Developer Changed My Life.
Great talk. Also good to see examples of technology being used in such a way to help those in vulnerable situations.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Jun.2018)
Managing Dependencies Is More Than "Composer Update"
Lots of useful little tips; we'll be changing how we comment composer updates off the back of this talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Jun.2018)
Strategies for Transitioning Into Leadership
Entertaining and thoughtful talk. Great Q&A at the end.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(04.Jun.2018)
Machine Ethics and Emerging Technologies
Wow, what a great talk. Lots of interesting and thought provoking parts to it, especially questions like "would you buy an unethical car?" A fantastic talk to end a conference on.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Jun.2018)
Web Security - The Human Factor
A good talk. Entertaining and funny to keep the audience engaged. The reason for 4 rather than 5 is that I was a bit uncomfortable about the naming and shaming. I think for future talks you should keep the companies and individuals mentioned anonymous, unless they've explicitly given permission for you to use their names in that way. No one is perfect and we all make mistakes. Other than that great talk and I'd love to see you speak again.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(05.Jun.2018)
OWASP Top 10 for Developers
Interesting and very useful content. My tip for improvement is perhaps spend a little longer explaining how the risks are assessed. I got there eventually but was a bit confused in the first couple of examples. Other than that great talk.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(05.Jun.2018)
IBM Watson & PHP, A Practical Demonstration
I like the idea behind the talk and some of the points raised were interesting. The speaker clearly had a lot of enthusiasm for the subject. A few thoughts on making an even better talk... I would have preferred more time to see the demo in action. Even if it had worked we were low on time by the start of the demo. Unfortunately the live demo gremlins struck. I would recommend recording demos (e.g. using tools like QuickTime) ahead of time and then playback the video in the talk. This massively reduces the risk of the live demo. I've seen a number of other speakers use this technique. If demos are long then break them down into several steps so that people can ask questions between each step or you can emphasise points that are important. Another minor improvement: I thought some of the slides were a bit text heavy. Perhaps reduce some of the slides to headline bullets. I'm also not sure if the slides with PHP code really added much. Essentially you were just making an HTTP request. The fact a simple HTTP request is all that is required is interesting. The code to do it is less interesting; perhaps reference a github repo or similar for those who are unsure of how to do this. The topic is very interesting and with a bit of polishing this will be a 5 star talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(05.Jun.2018)
How Will We Test All the Things?!
A great first conference talk. Christian clearly had a passion for the topic and that showed in the delivery. My suggestion for improvement would be to shorten the introduction and spend more time on the lessons learned. Great talk and I look forward to seeing you speak at another conference soon.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Behat for characterisation on tests
A good introduction to characterisation tests. I'd love to see a version of this talk or even a workshop that goes into more detail, especially with nitty gritty, like code that makes database calls.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Testing Strategy with the Help of a Static Analyzer
A great talk. Static analysis has come along a long way with PHP 7 and the message about these tools needs to get out. Nice code ideas to show to write code in such a way to get the most out of testing and SA. I'll be making a few changes to how I code based on this talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Are you out of memory, or have plenty to spare?
Really enjoyable talk. Concepts well explained. Good slides clear slides. My only tip for improvement... I still felt at the end a little unsure how to actually read top to work out what was going on memory wise. I would have liked a final review of the top command output, maybe explicitly highlighting parts of it, as a reminder the the important information with regard to memory usage. Great talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
Keynote : Controlling the variables
From a technical perspective I'm blown away; that was one slick presentation. Spending a few days digesting the talk I broadly agree with the take aways - you make your own luck. It felt quite a bold talk, although there is context I'm a Brit and we're a bit more reserved and generally self deprecating. I'd find it hard to go on stage and say things like I think I'm better at X than person Y so I think I should be doing X. However this is an important reminder that there are subtle cultural differences and I should be aware that being more forward about ability might be required in different parts of the world. To make it a 5 star talk I would probably make it a little shorter and focus a bit more on some of the detail. For example the speaker mentioned things like when in new situations work out the key players. Maybe a little detail on how to do that would be good.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
When testing makes no sense
I'm a strong advocate of testing, however I agree completely with the speaker that sometimes testing, or certainly automated testing, is not worth the effort. I think maybe examples or stories would have helped. E.g. in situation X I did a lot of testing and it didn't pay off because of Y. However on project Z we didn't do any testing and all these bad things happened.
Rating: 3 of 5 
(11.Jun.2018)
A self-describing API
Good to see another take on generating APIs documentation. I'm used to things like Nelmio. I think missing from at the the start was a brief overview of how other tools approach the problem and why the need for the approach you outlined. For example other API documentation tools that I have used use the annotations to get this information. If the annotations are also used to generate the routes then it is likely that the documentation generated will be correct. The approach of returning an array with this information can leave the actual and documentation out of sync with each other. I spent a lot of the first half of the talk wondering why annotations were not being used. A little bit at the start explaining what is missing from existing solutions would probably have helped me, As an aside: I see benefits for the method of API documentation generation you mention in fact I wonder if a hybrid approach would work best. Getting as much routing, parameters and return type information from annotations or router information, code reflection, etc and add the ability to override or add additional information via code (as your tool does)? Interesting to see different ways of working. Thanks for the talk.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(14.Jun.2018)
Build your own Neural Network, with PHP!
A great talk. The topic was interesting. The slides were superb, some of the best I've seen. You spoke really well, it was clear and the right pace through out. To improve... I wonder if you could still tell the same story but remove some of the maths. The maths could still exist, but maybe be in a blog post or markdown doc in the git repo which is referenced in your talk. It was pretty complicated so to really grasp it probably requires time sitting down reading. Also maybe provide further reading slide at the end. My final suggestion would be to submit this to a conference! A great first full length talk.
Rating: 5 of 5 
(14.Jun.2018)
Time Zones and Calendars are a PITA
Really enjoyable talk. You made what could have been a dry topic very entertaining. Loved the quiz at the start. My only minor suggestion for improvement is I thought some of the slide transitions could have been done as you were explaining the steps rather than after. I thought this was a fantastic talk and I learnt lots about time and timezones.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Sep.2018)
The Symfony Open-source Community
A good first talk. Confidently delivered. Tips to improve: - a few more rehearsals to make it all a bit smoother. - Work out what your key messages are - Make sure those points are clearly made at the appropriate points in your talk. - Make sure they are summarised at the end. - Make sure the structure of the talk supported the points you're trying to make. With a bit of polishing this should make a good keynote.
Rating: 4 of 5 
(19.Sep.2018)
Dungeons, Dragons & Developers
It's great to see a different angle things we as developer have to deal with most days. A good talk. Entertaining speaker. Clean, clear slides. Good font! I came to this talk knowing nothing of DnD. I'm sure others will be in a similar situation. I think you have 2 choices for conferences: Update abstract and/or say very near the start that this talk assumes basic knowledge of DnD. This allows those with no knowledge to go to another talk, or at least stay having been forewarned. Much in the same way speakers might say this talk assumes working knowledge of technology X. Or better still, give a DnD 101 for people like me, so we can stay and get the most out of it. I don't think it'll take long to get everyone up to speed. I didn't quite get the grid bit, but that's probably just me. I thought there were times when there wasn't a clear enough delineation between the story telling and application to real life. Perhaps whilst telling stories you could have the hat on, and then when doing the applying to real life bit remove the hat. (Or have 2 positions on the stage depending on what you're doing). Also there were spells when it sounded like you were reading which felt less engaging than when you were speaking normally. I realise, but only a few days after the event, that this might be deliberate. Again a DnD 101 at the start might help with noobs like me. I think this is a very good approach to a subject. To make it 5 star you just need to make sure everyone knows the DnD basics.

Events They'll Be At

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Events They Were At

php[tek] 2018 May 29, 2018
PHP North West 2017 Sep 28, 2017
PHP Yorkshire 2017 Apr 07, 2017
ScotlandPHP 2016 Oct 28, 2016
phpDay 2018 May 11, 2018
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